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, ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 

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P\M^ ^JWa<. -%jUkJ2^JU^s>^ C^ 977.202 InSd J^^: 

\ A- Dunn, Jacob Piatt 

(^ OOfl 1~ ' 1855-1924. 

\..6-^^^^SLAJ<-^^^^ Greater Indianapolis 






Ronald L. Darrah 

8126 Bittern Ln 
Indianapolis, IN. 462B6-1780 




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Greater Indianapolis 



The History, the Industries, the Institutions, and 
the People of a City of Homes 



Jacob Piatt Dunn 

Secretary of the Indiana Historical Society 



VOLUME II 

ILLUSTRATED 




THE LEWIS PUBLISraNG COMPANY 
CHICAGO 



Ai!i«ffl fc*!' wm 'i<ii>m 

m Wefastc: Sif^et 

PO Box 2270 

fort Wayn^, IN 46S0i-22;/§ 



Copyright, 1910, 

by 

THE LEWIS PUBLISHING CO. 



History of Greater Indianapolis. 



• Calvin Fletcher was born in Ludlow, Ver- 
mont, on the, 4th of February, 1798. The 
town of Ludlow is in the County of Windsor, 
and is situated on the eastern slope of the 
Green Mountain range, midway between Kut- 
land and Bellows Falls. A ridge of highlands 
separates the counties of Windsor and Rutland, 
and forms the boundary between the towns of 
Ludlow and Mount Holly, the latter being in 
the County of Rutland. Mr. Fletcher was a 
descendant of Robert Fletcher, who was a na- 
tive of one of the northern counties of Eng- 
land, probably Yorkshire, and settled in Con- 
cord, Massachusetts, in 1630, where he died 
at the age of eighty-five on the 3rd of April, 
1677, leaving four sons, Francis, Luke, Will- 
iam and Samuel. Calvin's father, Jesse 
Fletcher, a son of Timothy Fletcher, of West- 
ford, Massachusetts, was bom in that town on 
the 9th of November, 1763, and was prepar- 
ing for college under his elder brother, the 
Rev. Elijah Fletcher, of Hopkinton, New 
Hampshire, when the troubles of the Revolu- 
tion arrested his progress. He joined the 
patriotic army and served in two campaigns 
of six or eight months each toward the close 
of the war. Jesse's brother Elijah was the 
pastor of the church in Hopkinton from the 
23rd of Januarv, 1773, until his death on the 
Sth of April. 1786. The second daughter of 
Rev. Elijah Fletcher was Grace, a most ac- 
complished and attractive person, who became 
the first wife of the great American states- 
man and orator, Daniel Webster. Col- 
onel Fletcher Webster (who fell at the head 
of his regiment in the second battle of Bull 
Run, August 30, 1862) received at his chris- 
tening the family name of his mother. Cal- 
vin Fletcher and his oldest son. Rev. J. C. 
Fletcher, more than once talked with Daniel 
Webster concerning this cherished first wife 
(Grace). The daughter of Grace's brother 
(Timothy Fletcher) became the wife of Dr. 
Brown-Sequard, the famous specialist of 
Paris, France. Jesse married in 1781, when 
about eighteen years old, Lucy Keyes of 



Westford, who was bom on the 15th of No- 
vember, 1765, being therefore hardly sixteen 
when she became the bride' of Jesse. The 
young couple emigrated from Westford to 
Ludlow, Vermont, about the lyear 1783, and 
were among the first settlers of the place. 
From that time until the day of his death, 
in February, 1831, Jesse Fletcher lived on the 
same farm- He was the first town clerk of 
Ludlow; was a justice of the peace, and the 
second representative to the General Court 
from Ludlow. In that town all his fifteen 
children, except the eldest, were born. His 
widow died in 1846. Calvin was the eleventh 
of these fifteen children, most of whom lived 
to maturity. Under the teachings of an ex- 
cellent father and mother of more than or- 
dinary ability, Calvin early learned those 
habits of industry and self-reliance and those 
principles of uprightness which uniformly 
characterized him in after life. Whilg per- 
forming all the duties exacted from a Boy on 
a New England farm in those early days, he 
soon manifested a strong desire for a classical 
education, which was stimulated both by his 
mother's advice and the success of his brother 
Elijah, who had, a few years before, com- 
pleted his college course at Darmouth Col- 
lege. In accordance with the prevailing cus- 
tom of the early New England families, his 
parents had selected Elijah as the one best 
fitted by natural endowments and bent of mind 
to receive a college education. Such selection 
of but one member of a large family was in- 
deed a matter of necessity in those days, when 
all were obliged to labor hard for the stem' 
necessities of life. Through his own exertions 
Calvin earned money enough to pay the ex- 
penses of a brief course of instruction at the 
academies of Randolph and Royalton in Ver- 
mont, and afterwards at the rather famous 
classical academy of Westford, Massachusetts. 
His classical studies were interrupted by pe- 
cuniary difficulties at home. His father be- 
came financially embarrassed; the older sons 
and daughters had already. gone out into the 



HISTOEY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



world, and Calvin obtained permission from 
his father to go also. His classical studies 
had proceeded as far as Virgil, and he had 
probably taken delight in reading of the wan- 
derings of the pious Eneas. He determined 
to be a sailor; and in April, 1817, in his nine- 
teenth year, he went to Boston and tried to 
obtain "a berth on board an East Indiaman. 
He failed to get an engagement as a sailor be- 
fore the mast, and thereupon turned his face 
toward tiie country west of the Alleghenies. 
He worked his way, mostly on foot, to Penn- 
sylvania, where he engaged himself for a short 
time as a laborer in a brickyard. He had left 
home in a spirit of adventure, and had by 
no means laid aside his literary tastes. While 
working as a laborer he always carried with 
him a small edition of Pope's poems, which 
he read (particularly the translations of 
Homer's Iliad and the Odyssey) at each mo- 
ment of leisure. But his brick-making came 
speedily to an end. His intelligence attracted 
the attention of a gentleman named Foote, 
by whom he was encouraged to travel further 
Avestward, to the State of Ohio. Mr. Fletcher 
has himself described this period of his life 
in a letter to Ut. John Ward Dean, corre- 
sponding secretary of the New England His- 
torical and Genealogical Society, dated March 
25, 1861, in which he says: 

"In two months I worked my way, mostly 
on foot, to the western part of Ohio, and 
stopped at Urbana, then the frontier settle- 
ment of state, and had no letters of introduc- 
tion. I obtained labor as a hired-hand for a 
short time, and then a school. In the fall of 
1817 I obtained a position in the law office of 
Hon. James Cooley, a gentleman of talents and 
fine education, one of a large class which 
graduated at Yale under Dr. Dwight. He was 
sent to Peru (as IJ. S. charge d'affairs) under 
John Quincy Adams' administration, and died 
there." 

During the interval between his school teach- 
ing and entering upon the study of law at ^Mr. 
Cooley's office, he was for a time private tutor 
in the familv of a ^[r. Gwin, whose fine library 
gave him an excellent opportunity for read- 
ing. In 1819 he went to Richmond, Virginia, 
and was licensed to practice by the supreme 
court of the Old Dominion. At one time he 
thought of settling in Virginia, but even then 
his strong love of freedom and respect for the 
right of man mn<le him renounce his intention. 
He was an anti-slavery man from principle, 
and was one when it cost something to be one. 
No person who was not living thirty or forty 
years ago in the soutliern part of Ohio or In- 
diana can realize the bitter prejudice that then 
existed against the old-time abolitionist : he 



was considered an enemy of his country, and 
was subjected to both social and political ostra- 
cism. But this did not deter llr. Fletcher, 
nor cause him to alter his course. He once 
said to one of his sons, long after he had be- 
come celebrated as a lawyer in the new cap- 
ital of the State of Indiana: "When I am in 
tbe court house, engaged in an important case, 
if the governor of the state should send in 
word that he wished to speak to me, I would 
rc]>ly that I could not go ; but if a Quaker 
should touch me on the shoulder and say 'a 
colored man is out here in distress and fear,' 
I would leave the court house in a minute to 
see the man, for I feel that I would have to 
account at that last day when He shall ask 
me if I have visited the sick and those in 
prison or bondage, and fed the poor. The 
great of this world can take care of them- 
selves, but God has made us stewards of the 
downtrodden, and we must account to Him."' 
A man of this stamp could, of course, find 
no abiding at that time in Virginia, and Mr. 
Fletcher, renouncing his intention of settling 
there, returned to Urbana, where he became 
the law partner of Mr. Cooley in 1820. Quot- 
ing again from the autobiographical sketch em- 
jjoflied in his letter to Mr. Dean, we use Mr. 
Fletcher's own words in describing this period 
of his career: 

"In the fall of 1820 I was admitted to the 
liar, and became the law partner of my worthy 
friend and patron, Mr. Cooley. In the sum- 
mer of 1821, the Delaware Indians left the 
central part of Indiana, then a total wilder- 
ness, and the new state selected and laid off 
Indianapolis as its future capital, but did not 
make it such until by removal of the state 
archives and the transfer of all state offices 
thither in November, 1824, and by the meeting 
of the legislature there on the 10th of Jan- 
uary, 182.J. I had married, and on my re- 
quest, my worthy partner permitted me to 
leave him to take up my residence at the 
place designated as the seat of government of 
Indiana. In September of that year I left 
Urbana with a wagon, entered the wilderness, 
and after traveling fourteen days and camp- 
ing out tlie same number of nights, readied 
Indianapolis, where there were a few newly 
erected cabins. No counties had been laid 
off in the newly acquired territory ; but in a 
few years civil divisions were made. I com- 
menced the practice of law, and traveled twice 
annuallv over nearly one-third of the north- 
western part of the state; at first without 
roads, bridges or ferries. In 182.") I was ap- 
pointed state's attornev for the Fifth Judicial 
Circuit, embracing some twelve or. fifteen cou-- 
ties. Tills office I held about one vear, wln-n 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



645 



1 was elected to the state senate, served seven 
years, resigned, and gave up official positions, 
as I then supposed for life. But in 1834 I 
was appointed by the legislature one of four 
to organize a state bank, and to act as sink- 
ing-fund commissioner. I held this place 
also for seven years. From 1843 to 1859 I 
acted as president of the branch of the state 
bank at Indianapolis, until the charter ex- 
pired." 

The simple and- unostentatious words in 
which Mr. Fletcher alludes to his connection 
with the state do not convey any idea of the 
struggle he had to go through in reference to 
its organization. As senator of the state of 
Indiana, he gave great offense to some of liis 
constituents by opposing the first charter 
proposed for the organization of a state bank. 
He resigned the senatorship, and the nest 
year another charter was prepared which ob- 
viated the objections. This charter passed 
through the legislature, and on the organiza- 
tion of the bank he became a director on the 
part of the state, and thenceforward gave 
banking and finance a large portion of his 
time and attention. ' Mr. Fletcher was the first 
lawyer who practiced his profession in Indian- 
apolis. His sterling honesty and strict atten- 
tion to business soon gained for him a large 
and lucrative practice. Hon. Daniel D. Pratt, 
at one time United States Senator from In- 
diana, was a student in his oflBce, and has con- 
tributed his recollections of Mr. Fletcher in 
a letter written after his old law preceptor's 
death, in which he savs: 

"In the fall of 1833 I entered his office. 
He was then about thirty-five years of age, 
possessed of a large practice, on the Circuit 
and in the Supreme Court, standing by com- 
mon consent at the head of the profession in 
central Indiana, and commanding the un- 
qualified confidence of the community. He 
fully deserved that confidence. Scrupulously 
hnneft, fair in his dealings with his clients, 
untiring in their interests, I do not think I 
have ever met a man in the legal profession 
of greater activity, energy, earnestness, and 
application to business. He forgot nothing, 
neglected nothing necessary to be done. This 
was the great secret of his professional suc- 
cess. ^Ir. Fletcher was a strong man, physi- 
cally, morally, and intellectually. In the 
early stages of his pioneer life he had to meet 
men face to face, and at times, with bodily 
force he had to resist those who attempted to 
deprive him of his rights. There were no 
courts at first in the infant settlement of In- 
diana to take cognizance of breaches of the 
pence, but each man had to be as it were 'a 
law unto himself." 



He was equal to the emergency, ana could 
defend himself. In the same spirit he stood' 
ready also to befriend those who otherwise 
might have been injured. He had when young 
felt the pressure of poverty, and had learned 
life from actual contact with its difficulties, 
and while this gave additional force and edge 
to his good sense and acquainted him with the 
details of humble life, it also aroused his dis- 
position to take the part of the poor, the help- 
less, and the oppressed. To them his services 
were often gratuitous or for meagre com- 
pensation. His sympathies were always active, 
and he had the faculty of conferring great 
benefits, not so by direct aid as by teaching 
them how to help themselves. Among those 
whom he thus befriended were many of the 
colored race, who in his early years vfeie still 
in bondage, and who' were only admitted to 
citizenship in the closing years of his life. 
Several elements contributed to Mr. Fletcher's 
eminent success as a lawyer. One of his most 
serviceable powers was his remarkable mem- 
orv, which seemed to hold all that was com- 
mitted to it. In his law office it was he who 
kept in mind all the details and who watched 
all the points of danger. He was a shrewd 
and sagacious judge of men, and had the 
faculty of inferring character from circum- 
stances generally overlooked. A local chron- 
icler says: "When introduced to a stranger, 
he would for some minutes give him his ex- 
clusive attention. He would notice every re- 
mark and movement, every expression of fea- 
ture, and even the minutiae , of dress, yet he 
did all this without giving offense. He seemed 
to be ever under some controlling influence 
which led him to study character". He viewed 
his cases dramatically, and realized them in 
actual life, then the legal aspects of the case 
were examined, authorities consulted, and the 
question involved settled after cautious delib- 
eration. He was not oratorical in addressing 
juries, but was a clear and effective speaker. 
His most prominent talent was his insight into 
the motives of parties and witnesses, and he 
was especially strong in cross-examination. 
In one case a witness who was compelled by 
him on cross-examination to disclose facts 
which contradicted his evidence in chief, faint- 
ed, and his evidence was disregarded by the 
jury. During the process of making up his 
decisions on questions of law or policy he pre- 
served entire impartiality, and was ready at 
any moment to abandon an untenable theory 
or opinion. He discouraged all unnecessary 
litigation, and had great success in adjusting 
cases bv agreement of the parties. To this 
point in his character, many well-to-do resi- 
dents of Indianapolis have feelingly testified 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



in recent years, and have said that to the good 
advice of Calvin Fletcher they owed all they 
possessed. His calm, just and effective method 
of reasoning with clients who came to him in 
the flush of heated controversy and thirsting 
for revenge for real or fancied wrongs, was 
like pouring oil on the troubled water. "Set- 
tle out of court and save costs", was a favor- 
ite maxim of his that will be remembered un- 
til all who knew him have passed away. Not- 
withstanding that his fees were moderate, his 
biisiness was so extensive and his industry 
achieved so much, that his income was large. 
His judicious investments, and his plain and 
unostentatious mode of living, led to the rapid 
accumulation of wealth. He was an example 
of temperance, avoiding the use of either liquor 
or tobacco, and never played cards, although 
that was a great pastime among the lawyers 
in his early days. The bar, judge and people 
were then thrown much together at country 
inns, and social and conversational talents 
were of great advantage to a lawyer. Here Mr. 
Fletcher was remarkably well endowed, hos- 
pitable to his friends, amiable to those in his 
office, and popular with all. Mr. Fletcher, 
during his long career as a lawyer, had sev- 
eral partners and they were friends to whom he 
was deeply attached, and the attachment was 
reciprocal ; the prosperity of one was the pros- 
perity of all. The two partners with whom 
he was the longest associated were Ovid Butler 
and Simon Yandes. Mr. Butler, after a pros- 
perous career, founded what is now known as 
"Butler University'', at Irvington, Indiana, 
which is one of the most flourishing educa- 
tional institutions of the Christian denomina- 
tion. Simon Yandes was a student with 
Messrs. Fletcher and Butler in 1837-38, after 
which ho took a course at the law school of 
Harvard University, and became the partner 
of his old instructors — the firm of Fletcher. 
Butler & Yandes continuing until the senior 
partner retired in 1843. In his autobiograph- 
ical sketch from which we have already 
quoted, :Mr. Fletcher says: "During the forty 
vears I have resided in Indiana, I have de- 
voted much of my time to agriculture and 
societies for its promotion, and served seven 
years as trustee of our city schools. I have 
been favored with a large family; nine sons 
and two daughters. Three of the former have 
taken a regular course and graduated at 
Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, 
and two a partial course at the same institu- 
tion. I have written no books, biit have as- 
sisted in compiling a law book". In 1860 he 
became a corresponding member of the New 
England Historic Genealogical Society, to the 
secretarv of which this letter was written. He 



was a great lover of nature, taking much in- 
terest in the study of ornithology, and making 
himself familiar with the habits, instincts, 
and characteristics of birds. The domestic 
animal found in him a sympathizing friend. 
The works of Audubon had a prominent place 
in his library, which included a well selected 
collection of general literature, and an accumu- 
lation of local newspapers (which he had 
neatly bound), books, and magazines of in- 
estimable value to the student of western his- 
tory, which at his death was deposited in one 
of the institutions of the City of Indianapolis. 
Simon Yandes, Esq., his former partner, in 
testifying to the character of Mr. Fletcher, 
states that what Allibone in his "Dictionary of 
Authors" says of Dr. Daniel Drake, of Cin- 
cinnati, is eminently true of Calvin Fletcher, 
viz. : "His habits were simple, temperate, ab- 
stemious; his labors rncessant". There was 
much in common between the two men. Alli- 
bone's further description of Drake is that of 
Calvin Fletcher: "A philanthropist in the 
largest sense, he devoted himself freely and 
habitually to works of benevolence and meas- 
ures for the amelioration of distress, the ex- 
tension of religion and intelligence, the good 
of his fellow creatures, the honor and prosper- 
ity of his country". The fine tribute of Sen- 
ator Pratt, from which we have already made 
a l)rief extract, concludes as follows: 

"He was a very simple man in his tastes. 
Though possessed of ample means no one 
could have inferred it from his manner of life. 
His family lived and dressed plainly. He was 
himself without a particle of ostentation; re- 
publican simplicity characterized evei^- phase 
of his life, at home and abroad, in his dress, 
furniture, table and associations. He was 
fond of the society of plain, unpretentious peo- 
l>le. The humblest man entered his house un- 
abashed. He took pleasure in the society of 
aspiring young men and in aiding them by 
his counsel. He never tired in advising them; 
in setting before them motives for diligence 
and good conduct, and examples of excellence. 
He was fond of pointing to eminent men in the 
different walks of life, of tracing their history, 
and pointing out that the secret of their suc- 
cess lav in the virtues of diligence, continuous 
application to a specialty, strict integrit}- and 
temperance. Many young men of that period 
owe their information of character to these 
teachings of Mr. Fletcher. He taught them to 
lie honest and honorable, to be just, exact, 
prompt, diligent and temperate. He was him- 
self a shining example of all these virtues. 
Thev formed the granite base of his charac- 
ter. " Others will speak of the religious phase 
of his life. It was not common in those days 



HISTORY OP GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



fi47 



to find men of the legal profession of deep re- 
ligious fouvictions and illustrating those con- 
victions in their every-day life and conversa- 
tion. M r. Fletcher belonged to this exceptional 
class. Jteligious exercises in his family were 
habitual He was a constant attendant at 
church, and gave liberally to the support of 
the ministry. The success of his Master's 
Kingdom upon the earth lay very near his 
heart. He regarded religion as forming the 
only reliable basig for successful private and 
national life. In his death, the world has lost a 
good man, who contributed largely in laying 
the foundations not only of the city where he 
dwelt, but of the state itself. He was one of 
its pioneers and leading men. His voice and 
example were ever on the side of virtue, and 
he contributed largely in molding the public 
character." 

No interest of Calvin Fletcher's life was 
greater than that which he showed towards 
the public school of Indianapolis. He was 
one of three who constituted the first board 
of school trustees. In recognition of this fact 
and because he labored for years in the inter- 
est of a system excelled by none in this county, 
ihe school on Virginia avenue. No. 8, near 
liis old home was named "The Calvin Fletcher 
Scliool". 

ilr. Fletcher's death, which occurred on the 
-2Gth of May. 1866, the result of a fall from 
lii? horse a few weeks previous, caused much 
public sorrow. He had long made for him- 
self an honorable record as a banker after his 
retirement from the practice of law, and the 
bankers of Indianapolis passed resolutions on 
the day after his death, in which they said: 

"His devotion to every patriotic impulse; 
his vigilant and generous attention to every 
call of benevolence ; his patient care of all 
wholesome means of public improvement; his 
interest in the imperial claims of religion, 
morale, and education, and his admirable suc- 
cess in securing the happiness and promoting 
the culture of a large family, show conclusively 
that whatever importance he attached to the 
acquisition of wealth, he never lost sight of 
the responsibility to that Great Being who 
smiled so generously on his life and whose 
approbation made his closing hours serene and 
hopeful." 

Among those who attended his funeral were 
a large number of colored people, whose friend 
he had always been, and who now testified 
their deep affection and veneration for him. 
His remains Avere interred in the cemetery at 
Crown Hill. Indianapolis. 

Mr. Flctclier was twice married. His first 
wife. Sarah Hill, a descendant of the Ran- 
dolphs of Virginia, was born near [Nlaysville, 



Kentuek}^, in 1801, but her father, Joseph Hill, 
moved to Urbana, Ohio, when she was very 
young. This marriage, which took place in 
May, 1821, was a happy one in every respect. 
Mrs. Fletcher was a very quiet, lady-like per- 
son, and one would judge from her delicate 
appearance that she would be the last to en- 
dure the rigors of a pioneer life; but she 
proved equal to the situation and not only 
made a happy home for her husband and eleven 
children, but her industry, economy and gen- 
eral good management aided her husband very 
greatly in laying the foundation of his for- 
tune. He cherished her memory and her chil- 
dren all held her in most grateful remembrance. 
The names of the children of Calvin and Sarah 
Hill Fletcher are here noted in the order of 
their birth: James Cooley, Elijah Timothy, 
Calvin Miles Johnson, Stoughton Alphonso, 
'\raria Antoinette Crawford, Ingram, William 
Baldwin, Stephen Keyes, Lucv Keves and Al- 
bert Elliott. For his "second wife Mr. Fletcher 
married Mrs. Keziah Price Lister. No chil- 
dren were born of this union. 

►Stoughtox a. Fletcher, Junior, was 
one of the -eleven children and the fifth of 
nine sons born to Calvin and Sarah (Hill) 
Fletcher. He was born at Indianapolis, Octo- 
ber 2.), 1831, lived in the city continuously 
more than sixty-three years, and died in -his 
beautiful home on Clifford avenue, March-^8, 
189."). The simple record of his noble, un- 
ostentatious life is the most fitting eulogy that 
could be pronounced. In youth he enjoyed the 
benefit of wholesome discipline instituted by 
a broad-minded, practical Christian father to 
qualify his sons for self-support and useful 
citizenship. He had the educational advan- 
tage afforded by the best schools of Indiana 
and a partial course in Brown University at 
Providence. He was trained on his father's 
farm in the actual work of husbandry, and 
manifested unusual aptitude for agricultural 
pursuits in boyhood. He studied telegraphy 
and became a practical operator at the age of 
nineteen. This was .supplemented by a study 
of the operating department of railroads at 
an early dav, and he was placed in charge 
as conductor of tlie first train that ran out of 
the Union Station at Indianapolis, on the old 
Bellefontaine railroad, in June, 1853. He ap- 
plied himself with such assiduity as to become 
conversant with tlie machinery employed and 
the methods of conducting railroad business. 
He could run a locomotive and understand its 
parts as well as the process of construction. 
His thoroughness naturally led to promotion 
and in two years he was superintendent of the 
road. After a valuable and successful expe- 
rience of five Years in railroad service he re- 



648 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



signed in order to assume the duties of clerk 
and teller in the bank of his uncle, Stoughton 
A. Fletcher. With characteristic energj' he 
applied himself to the task of learning all the 
details of banking. It was a matter of prin- 
ciple with him to know all that could be known 
of any business with which he was connected, 
whether it was farming, railroading, telegraphy, 
banking or manufacturing. Ultimately he be- 
came a partner in the bank, associated with 
F. M. Churchman. In 1868 he was elected 
president of the Indianapolis Gas Company 
and held the position for a period of more 
than ten years. He acquired a thorough, prac- 
tical knowledge of the process and the cost of 
making illuminating gas, managing the com- 
pany's business with rare executive ability. 
Upon the reorganization of the Atlas Engine 
Works in 1878 he was chosen president of the 
company and retained the position until his 
death. His name, his energy and varied ex- 
perience combined to build up and establish a 
manufactory of engines and boilers, unequaled 
in extent and equipment by any singular con- 
cern west of the Alleghenies. A visitor at 
the works would readily discern that the eye 
of a master was upon every department, and a 
trained financier of strong mental grasp was 
?na'naging the business. It is creditable to his 
humanity that during the long season of de- 
pression "he kept the works running at a loss 
in order to support the men who had served 
him long and faithfully. When impossible to 
employ the whole force at the same time, it 
was the custom to divide the men, giving em- 
ployment to Pome of them one week and others 
the week following. By this plan all the 
families dependent upon the works were main- 
tained. He assisted in organizing the In- 
dianapolis National Bank and served as one 
of its directors for many years. At various 
times he was connected with other institutions 
and enterprises of importance, always in such 
a manner as to preserve a high character for 
honor and integrity. 

It was not alone in the domain of private 
business or commercial affairs that Stoughton 
A. Fletcher was conspicuously successful. He 
is entitled to higher honor for his spirit and 
unselfish devotion to the community interests 
and welfare. He was one of the earliest pro- 
moters of the project to establish a new ceme- 
tery, selected the site of Cro>^Ti Hill himself, 
assisted in the organization of the company, 
and was chosen treasurer of the Cemetery .\s- 
sociation upon its incorporation in 1863. 
Eleven years later he was elected the remainder 
of his life. The beantv of that silent city is 
due very lavgelv to his taste, enterprise and 
liheralitv. Under liis superintendence the 



loveliness of a natural site, impossible to dupli- 
cate in all the surrounding country, was en- 
hanced by skillful landscape-gardening. Mr. 
Fletcher was identified either actively or in 
sympathy with every enterprise of popular 
concern in the city. His counsel was sought 
and his support enlisted. He was at all times 
relieving want with open-handed liberality, but 
his benevolence was not exhausted by personal 
contributions to aid the suffering. He quietly 
assisted many a worthy young man in def lay- 
ing expenses incident to acquiring an educa- 
tion. He also united with others to form 
charitable associations, whose beneficence ex- 
tends to all deserving poor in the city. He 
was from the beginning a member of tlie In- 
diana State Board of Charities, giving much 
time and thought to its work. His philan- 
thropy was comprehensive in scope and pur- 
pose, assuming other forms than contributions 
to relieve the destitute. He offered to the city 
the site of a magnificent park, as a gift^ condi- 
tioned only upon its improvement and* main- 
tenance for the public use stipulated in the 
conveyance. He endeavored to promote the 
welfare and reformation of the unfortunate 
and the criminal. He was president of the 
first board of trustees of the Indiana Reform- 
atory for Women and Girls. As this was 
among the first institutions of its class estaTj- 
lished in the United States, its management 
afforded scope for the practical applications of 
his broad and wholesome views. He was mar- 
ried first in 1856 to Miss Ruth Elizabeth Bar- 
rows, daughter of Elisha Barrows, Esq., of 
Augusta, Maine, whose life, treasured in the 
memory of her children, was one characterized 
by admirable wisdom in the management if 
affairs, by rare unselfishness and tender devo- 
tion to her husband and family. She died in 
1889. Two sons and two daughters born of 
this marriage survive: Charles B. and Jesse, 
who were associated with their father in tlie 
business of manufacturing, and continued tlit- 
management of the Atlas Engine Works after 
his death ; :\rrs. E. F. Hodges, of Indianapolis, 
and ilrs. James R. :Macfarlane of Pittsburg. 
Pennsylvania. In December, 1891, he was 
married to ^liss ]klarie Louise Bright, daugh- 
ter of the late Dr. John W. Bright of Lexing- 
ton. Kentucky. 

Even while most actively engaged in busi- 
ness Mr. Fletcher found time for travel and 
study. He has visited the countries of Eu- 
rope and extended his journey leisurely into 
Egypt and Palestine, studying the physical 
condition of foreign countries and peoples suf- 
ficiently to make intelligent comparison and 
appreciate the institutions of his own countn-. 
During the last few years of his life he trav- 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



649 



eled imieh in the United States, usually ac- 
companied b)' his wife. His health was re- 
newed and his life prolonged by travel. In 
many respects he was a remarkable man — re- 
markable for the equability of his temper and 
the kindliness of his disposition; for the buoy- 
ancy of his nature and the adaptability of his 
powers; for his success in business and his 
clean, honorable methods; for his perennial 
courtesy and unfailing generosity. He was a 
lover of nature, a lover of art and a lover of 
books. His humanity was large. He had 
sympathy for his fellow-men and regard for 
the welfare of his neighbors. He admired the 
poems of Whittier, expressive of human sym- 
pathy and kindness. To a gentleness of man- 
ner, which invited social intercourse, was united 
a sturdy determination which never faltered 
and seldom failed of accomplishment. He 
lived in a pure atmosphere, above petty annoy- 
ances and contentions, patiently enduring'mis- 
fortune and suffering, quietly enjoying pros- 
perity and the better things of life. His home 
was filled with beautiful things, evidences of 
culture and refinement, which friends enjoyed 
with him and his family. His character was 
strong in its integrity; his friendships were 
fincere and constant. He attested the dignity 
of labor and exemplified the nobility of a 
Christian life. The following, quoted from an 
editorial article in one of the daily newspa- 
pers, fittingly closes this biographical sketch: 
"By the death of Stoughton A. Fletcher, In- 
dianapolis loses one of its oldest native-bom 
citizens and one of its purest and best of any 
nativity. There are very few men living in the 
city who were born here as early as 1831, and 
none born here or elsewhere who better bore 
without abuse the grand old name of gentle- 
men than Stoughton .\. Fletcher. Some of the 
older citizens who knew his parents can easily 
understand from whence he derived the quali- 
ties that made him so manly and so true, so 
gentle and ^=o tender, so admirable in all that 
goes to round out character. It is a great thing 
for a man to live in the same community sixty- 
three vear«, to die in the town where he was 
bom and to leave behind him a record as con- 
spicuously clean as that which marks the sum- 
ming up of Mt. Fletcher's life. He would not 
have had his friends claim that he was a great 
man. He did not seek notoriety or power, 
never held office and was not ambitious for 
distinction of any kind, except the love of his 
friends, the respect of his neighbors and the 
willing tribute of all to his absolute integrity 
and high sense of commercial honor. A worthy 
son of a most worthy sire, he was true to his 
ancestrv, tme to his family and friends, true 
to all the demands of good citizenship and true 



to his own high standard of thinking and 
acting." 

Chkistopher B. Coleman. Prominently 
identified with educational work and with af- 
iaiTS of distinctive civic import in Indianap- 
olis, Professor Christopher Bush Coleman is 
the incumbent of the chair of modern history 
in Butler College and he is also corresponding 
secretary of the Indiana Historical Society. 
His position in the community eminently en- 
titles him to representation in this history of 
Greater Indianapolis and its people. 

Professor Coleman was bom in the city of 
Springfield, Illinois, on the 24th of April, 
1875, and is a son of Louis Harrison Coleman 
and Jennie Bush (Logan) Coleman. The an- 
cestral line is traced back to James Ormsby 
Coleman, who was a resident of Virginia in 
the colonial epoch of our national history and 
who eventually removed thence to Kentucky, 
of which commonwealth he became a pioneer, 
having been a wheelwright by trade. He con- 
tinued to reside in Kentucky until his death, 
as did also his wife, whose maiden name was 
Lucy Hawkins. Their son, Hardin Hawkins 
Coleman, became a citizen of Hopkinsville, 
Kentucky, where he was engaged in the fur- 
niture business. His wife, whose maiden name 
was Barbara Ann Hopper, was a daughter of 
the Hopper who, in 1837, liberated his slaves 
and removed from Kentucky to Illinois; her 
mother was a cousin of General William Henry 
Harrison. One of the sons of Hardin Hawkins 
Coleman and Barbara Ann (Hopper) Coleman 
was Louis Harrison Coleman, father of the sub- 
ject of this sketch. 

Louis Harrison Coleman was born at Hop- 
kinsville, Kentucky, on the 7th of Septem- 
Ijcr, 1842, and a portion of his early life was 
passed on a farm near Monmouth, Illinois. 
After attaining to maturity he became a dry- 
goods merchant at Bloomington, that state, 
whence he later removed to Springfield, the 
capital of Illinois, in which city he continued 
in the retail dry-goods trade for many years, 
later becoming a banker and manufacturer. 
He is a citizen of prominence and influence. 

On the 4th of October, 1866, was solemnized 
the marriage of Louis Harrison Coleman to 
■Nfiss Jennie Bush Logan, daughter of Hon. 
Stephen Trigg Logan and America T. (Bush) 
Logan, whose marriage was recorded under 
date of June 25, 1823. The founder of the 
T>ogan family in America came to this country 
from Ireland and settled in Augusta County, 
Virginia, about 1750. His son. Colonel John 
Logan, was a member of the Virginia legisla- 
ture and of the constitutional convention of 
Kentuckv in 1799. David Logan, son of Col- 
onel John Logan and father of Stephen Trigg 



650 



HISTOKY OF GEEATEK INDIANAPOLIS. 



TiOgan, removed from Kentucky to Sangam(jn 
County, Illinois, in 1832, and in the latter 
state he passed the residue of his life, having 
been one of the sterling pioneers of the county 
in which the capital of the state is located. 
Stephen T. Logan was an influential factor in 
public affairs in Illinois, having served re- 
peatedly as a member of its legislature and 
also having been a delegate to the state con- 
stitutional convention of 1847. He was asso- 
ciated with Abraham Lincoln in the' practice 
of law from 1841 to 1844 and was a delegate 
to the Chicago convention that nominated Lin- 
coln for the presidency. He also represented 
Illinois at the national peace conference in 
ISGO, and in 1872 he was presiding officer of 
the Republican state convention of Illinois, in 
the annals of whose history his name is one 
of distinctive prominence. Mrs. Louis H. Cole- 
man died in 1891. 

Christopher Bush Coleman, the immediate 
subject of this review, gained his early educa- 
tional discipline in the public schools of his 
native city of Springfield, Illinois, in whose 
high school he was graduated as a member of 
the class of 1891. In the following year he 
was graduated in Lawrenceville Academy, at 
Lawrenceville, New Jersey, after which he was 
matriculated in Yale University, where he con- 
tinued his studies for four years and where he 
was graduated in 1896, with honors, receiving 
the degree of Bachelor of Arts. In 1896-7 
Professor Coleman was a student in Auburn 
Theological Seminary, at Auburn, New York, 
and in 1897 he was a student in the Chicago 
Theological Seminary. In 1898-9 he attended 
the L^niversitv of Chicago, taking the degree of 
Bachelor of Divinity in the fall of 1899. Since 
1900 Professor Coleman has held consecutively 
the chair of modern history in Butler College, 
with the exception of twelve months, in 1904-5. 
passed in European travel and in special study 
in the University of Berlin, Germany. Since 
1908 Professor Coleman has been correspond- 
ing secretary of the Indiana Historical .Society, 
in whose affairs he maintains a lively and 
helpful interest. In this connection he is also 
editor of the Indiana Quarterly Maqazwe of 
IJiMory, the official paper of the society men- 
tioned. 

In polit'cs Professor Coleman gave his alle- 
giance to the Republican party until 1908, since 
which time he has maintained an independent 
attitude. He is a member of the Downey Ave- 
nue Christian Church, was president of the 
Indianapolis Christian Church Union for 
three vears. has been president of Butler Col- 
lege Settlement Association since 1907, and is 
a member of each the executive committee of 
the Indiana Young Men's Christian Associa- 



tion and the Marion County Board of Chari- 
ties. He is also identified with the Indiana 
Delta Kappa Epsilon Club, the Indiana Yale 
Association, the University Club of Indiana, 
the Indianapolis Literary Club, the Indiana 
Historical Society, the American Historical 
Association, the American Geographical So- 
ciety, the American Political Science Associa- 
tion, and the Irvington Atheneum, of which he 
was president in 1905-6 and of which he has 
been corresponding secretary since 1907. 

On the 25th of June, 1901, was solemnized 
the marriage of Professor Coleman to Miss 
Juliet Julian Brown, who was educated in 
Shortridge 5igh School, in Indianapolis, and 
in Butler College. She 'is a daughter of Judge 
Edgar Adelbert Brown and Martha (Julian) 
Brown, who still reside in Indianapolis, where 
.Judge Brown is a representative lawyer and 
where he served on the bench of the Circuit 
Court' from 1890 to 1898. Mrs. Coleman's 
maternal grandfather was Jacob Hoover Julian, 
who likewise served as judge of the Circuit 
Court and who was one of the founders of the 
village of Irvington, now an integral part of 
the City of Indianapolis. Professor and Mrs. 
Coleman became the parents of two children, 
of whom the younger is living. Ruth, born on 
the 15th of December, 1902, died on the 23rd 
of December, 1902; and Constance was born 
on the 18th of January, 1905, in Berlin, Ger- 
many. 

Paul F. Martin, M. D. Dr. Martin holds 
jirecedence as one of the representative sur- 
geons of his native city, where he is now de- 
voting his attention exclusively to the surgical 
Ijranch of his profession, in which his special 
skill is uniformly acknowledged. He was for 
more than three years superintendent of the 
Indianapolis City Hospital, giving an able and 
successful administration of its affairs, and his 
professional attainments are of high order, the 
result of natural predilection and the admir- 
able technical advantages he was afforded in 
preparing himself for the work of his exact- 
ing vocation. The doctor enjoys distinctive 
personal and professional popularity in the 
capital city and is well entitled to representa- 
tion in this publication. 

Dr. Paul Frederic ^Martin was born in In- 
dianapolis, on the 2fith of July, 1877, and is 
a son of Emil and Elise (Kuster) Martin, the 
former of whom was born in the City of Ber- 
lin. Germanv, in 1840, and the latter in the 
City of Cologne, Germany, in 1848. The father 
was reared and educated in his native land 
and was in his twenty-fifth year at the time 
of establishing his residence in Indianapolis, 
where he has since maintained his home and 
where he has long been prominently identified 



HISTOKY OF GEEATEE INDIANAPOLIS. 



651 



with important business interests, being now 
president of the Indianapolis Chemical Com- 
pany and being a citizen to whom has ever 
been accorded the highest measure of confi- 
dence and esteem. The mother was an infant 
at the time of her parents' immigration to 
America and the family located in Indianapolis 
when she was about two years of age. Here 
she was reared and educated and has main- 
tained her home during the long intervening 
3'ears. The Martin family lineage is traced 
back to the fine old Norman stock, and the 
Kuster family is of French origin, the original 
orthography of the name having been Custre. 

Dr. Martin attended the public schools of 
Indianapolis until he had attained to the age 
of ten years, and he then visited the City of 
Berlin, Germany, where he remained for three 
and one-half years and where, during the major 
portion of this period, he attended the "Beliner 
Gymnasium". He early manifested a distinc- 
tive musical taste and talent and when but 
eight years of age began the study of the violin, 
which he continued in the Berlin Conservatory 
during the period of his sojourn in Germany. 

Upon his return from Germany to Indianap- 
olis, Dr. Martin entered the Shortridge High 
School, in which he was graduated as a mem- 
ber of the class 'of 1894, after which he pur- 
sued higher academic branches in Butler Col- 
lege, at In'inpton, now a part of the City of 
Indianapolis, for one year, at the expiration 
of which he was matriculated in the Indiana 
Medical College, in which he completed the 
prescribed course and was graduated as a mem- 
ber of the class of 1898, with the degree of 
Doctor of ^[edicine. He did not attain his 
legal majority until the month following his 
graduation. During the three years of his 
undergraduate work in this college he was as- 
sistant to the Professor of Chemistry, and this 
position he retained for one year after his 
graduation, being at the same time resident 
physician at the Indianapolis City Dispensan-. 

In the summer of 1899. the doctor went to 
New York City, for the purpose of doing such 
])ost-graduate work as would more amply for- 
tify him for the practice of his profession. 
He there served as substitute interne in Eoose- 
velt Hospital and was identified with the Van- 
derbilt Clinic until the autumn of the same 
year, when he entered the senior class of the 
College of Plyvsicians and Surgeons, the med- 
ical dejinrtmcnt of historic old Columbia Uni- 
versity, in which he was graduated in 1900 and 
from which he received his supplemental de- 
gree of Doctor of Medicine. He then assumed 
the position of house surgeon of the German 
Hospital. New York City, which incumbency 
he retained until April, 1903, and during the 



ensuing three months he served the regular 
term at the Sloane Maternity Hospital, as 
resident physician. He then left the national 
metropolis and returned to his home in In- 
ydianapolis, where, in October, 1903, he became 
superintendent of the Indianapolis City Hos- 
pital. He continued in tenure of this ofiBce 
until January, 1906, when he retired to devote 
his attention to the private practice of his pro- 
fession, in which his success has been of the 
most unequivocal order. As already stated, he 
now gives his entire time and attention to the 
practice of surgery, in which his services are 
in much requisition and in connection with 
which he has gained a specially high reputa- 
tion. 

Dr. Martin is identified with the American 
Medical Association, the Indiana State Med- 
ical Society, and the Indianapolis Medical So- 
ciety, and in connection with his professional 
association in New York City he holds member- 
ship in the Sloane Maternity Hospital Alumni 
x\ssociation and the German Hospital Alumni 
Association. He is affiliated with the Phi Eho 
Sigma college fraternity. He holds the chair 
of associate surgeon at the Indiana University 
School of Medicine; is chief of surgical clinic 
and consulting surgeon of City and Bobbs' 
Dispensary; attending surgeon of Indianapolis 
City Hospital, and a member of the City 
Board of Health and Charities. Dr. Martin 
was married January 6, 1904, to Miss Edna 
Mathilde Kuhn, daughter of August M. and 
Emma D. Kuhn. 

Et. Eev. Joseph Marshall Francis, D. D., 
Protestant Episcopal Bishop of Indianapolis, 
was born at Eaglesmere, Pennsylvania, on the 
6th of April 1862, and is a son of James B. 
and Charlotte A. (Marshall) Francis. After 
receiving an academic education in Philadel- 
phia, Bishop Francis pursued courses at Eacine 
College and Oxford Universitv, and obtained 
his degree of D. D. from Neshotah (Wiscon- 
sin) College in 1899 and Hobart College in 
1901. 

Becoming a deacon in the Protestant Epis- 
copal Church in 1884, two years later Dr. Fran- 
cis was ordained to the priesthood, his pastor- 
ates of this period being at Milwaukee and 
Greenfield, Wisconsin. In 1886 he was appointed 
canon of the cathedral at the former city, and 
in 1887 assumed the rectorship at Whitewater, 
in 1888 gping as a missionary to Tokyo and 
not long afterward being appointed priest in 
charge of the cathedral at the Japanese capital, 
as well as professor in the Trinity Divinity 
School there. It was while thus engaged that 
he married Miss Stevens, of Milwaukee, Wis- 
consin. Eeturning from Japan in 1897, Bishop 
Francis was appointed rector of St. Paul's 



652 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



Church, Evan:-ville, in January, 1898, and in 
June, of the following year, was elected Bishop 
of Indiana, his consecration occurring on the 
21st of September. 

AuGi'sTUS Mnui'HY. For a quarter of a 
century no citizen of Indianapolis was more 
familiar with its manifold business and civic 
interests than the late Augustus Murphy, who 
for that protracted period was in the active 
management of the compilation and publica- 
tion of the Indianapolis city directory, being 
the local manager of the business of the great 
directory publishing house of R. L. Polk & 
Company. He was a man of great loyalty as 
a citizen and business man, and his genial and 
kindly nature drew to. him the most inviolable 
friendships. His life was marked by the high- 
est principles of integrity and honor and he 
lived and labored to goodly ends until he at 
last was called upon to answer the inexorable 
summons of death, having passed away, at his 
home in Indianapolis, on Friday, September 
26, 1902, secure in the high esteem of all with 
whom he had come in contact in the various 
relations of a long and signally useful career. 
Augustus Murphy was born at Fulton, New 
York, on the 6th of September, 1842, and was 
a son of Rev. Daniel and Honora (O'Connor) 
Murphy, both representatives of stanch old 
Irish stock. His father was a clergyman of 
the Protestant Episcopal Church and was a 
man of fine scholarship and of earnest devotion 
to his high calling, in which he continued to 
labor imtil his death. The subject of this 
memoir was afforded the advantages of the 
common schools and of the college at Fulton, 
New York, after leaving which institution he 
completed a course in a business college in 
Detroit, Michigan, where he took up his abode 
in 1860. There he was employed in the post- 
office until the inception of the Civil War, when 
he gave manifestation of his intrinsic loyalty 
by entering the Union commissary service, 
continuing to be identified with this depart- 
ment of the government until the close of the 
war. 

In 1872 Mr. Murphy became associated 
with the publication of the Michigan Gazeteer, 
issued by R. L. Polk, of Detroit, and he was 
interested with Mr. Polk in several such pub- 
lications. In 1875 he severed his connection 
with this concern and removed to Chicago, 
where he entered the newspaper business, also 
becoming publisher of the Milwaukee city di- 
rectory, under the title of :Murphy & Company. 
In 1877 he .«old that publication and became 
interested with R. L. Polk in the publication 
of the Indianapolis city directory, removing 
with his family to this city in the same year. 
Thereafter he continued as manager of the 



j)ublication of the Indianapolis directory until 
the close of his life, ever keeping the publica- 
tion up to the highest standard and in other 
ways contributing his quota to the upbuilding 
of the capital city as a metropolitan center. 
Upon his death he was succeeded by his only 
son, Charles S., who is still incumbent of the 
office. He manifested a lively interest in all 
that concerned the progress and prosperity of 
liis-home city and ever commanded the high 
regard of its representative business men. His 
political allegiance was given to the Repub- 
iican party, he attained to the thirty-second 
ilegree in the Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite 
of the Masonic fraternity and was identified 
with its adjunct organization, the Ancient 
Arabic Order of the Nobles of the Mystic 
Shrine. He also was prominently identified 
with various civic organizations that have ma- 
terially aided in advancing the progress of In- 
dianapolis. He was a communicant of the 
Protestant Episcopal Church, as is also his 
wife, who survives him and still resides in In- 
dianapolis. 

In 1871 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. 
Murphy to Miss Ida Templin, who was bom 
at North Manchester, Indiana, and who is a 
daughter of the late Benjamin F. Templin. 
Besides the one son Mr. Murphy is survived 
by one daughter. Miss Ruth, who remains with 
her widowed mother in the pleasant home that 
has long been a center of gracious hospitality. 

From the Directory Bulletin of November, 
1902, are taken the following appreciative 
words, which were there given in connection 
with an appreciative reference to the death of 
Mr. Murphy: "Mr. Murphy was blessed with 
a sunny disposition, and had a genial, kindly, 
whole-souled manner which attracted and held 
friends. He was a man of the strictest integ- 
rity and possessed, marked business ability". 

Meredith Nicholson. In the domain of 
literature, Indianapolis has gained a place of 
distinction and pre-eminence and among those 
who have contributed materially to its prestige 
as a literarv center, stands Meredith Nicholson, 
who is a native son of the state and whos§ pro- 
ductions, marked by gracious fancy, have given 
him a high reputation and a stanch following 
among the readers of the best in the fields of 
fiction and poesy. It is, of course, extraneous 
to the functions of this publication to enter 
into manifold details concerning the career of 
the many representative citizens whose names 
find a place within its pages and in the case at 
hand it can be hoped to present only a brief 
tribute to this talented son of the Hoosier com- 
monwealth. 

Meredith Nicholson was born in Crawfords- 
ville. ^Montgomery County, Indiana, on the 9th 



HISTORY OP GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



653 



of December, 1866, and is a son of Edward W. 
and Emily (Meredith) Nicholson. Edward 
Willis Nicholson was born in Kentuek}' and 
was a son of James Nicholson, who was a na- 
tive of North Carolina and a scion of a fam- 
ily founded in America in the colonial era. 
Representatives of the name were found en- 
rolled as valiant soldiers in the Continental line 
in the War of the Revolution. As a young 
man, Edward Nicholson came to Montgomery 
Count}', Indiana, where he for a time made his 
home with one of the brothers of his mother. 
He eventually became one of the substantial 
farmers of that section of the state, was a 
member of the Montgomery Guards, a zouave 
company, which became the nucleus of the 
Eleventh Indiana Infantry, commanded by the 
late distinguished General Lew Wallace. At 
the end of the three months' service, Mr. Nich- 
olson enlisted in the artillery, becoming captain 
of the Twenty-second Indiana Battery. He 
continued with his command until the close 
of the war, was with Sherman on the ever- 
memorable march to the sea, and his battery 
opened the battle of Shiloh, Captain Nicholson 
sighting and firing the first gun. Por a .time 
during the war he was assigned to detail duty 
in the drilling of new batteries in the City of 
Indianapolis, in which city he took up his 
residence in 1872. Here he remained until 
1888, when he removed to Washington, D. C, 
where he was connected in various capacities 
with the treasury department until his death, 
on the 19th of August, 1894. He was a valued 
member of the Grand Army of the Republic 
and also of the JMilitary Order of the Loyal 
Legion of the United States. He was married 
at the close of the war to Miss Emily Meredith, 
who was born at Centerville, Wayne County. 
Indiana, a daughter of Samuel Caldwell Mere- 
dith, who was an early settler at Centenille. 
where he became editor and publisher of a 
newspaper in the pioneer days and whence he 
joined in the hegira to California, at the time 
of the great gold excitement, in 1849. He 
finally returned to Indiana in 1S.52 and estab- 
lished his home in Indianapolis, where he 
passed the residue of his life. He was a son 
of John Wheeler ^feredith, who was born in 
the West Indies, of Welsh parentage, and who 
served as a soldier in the War of the Revolu- 
tion, at the close of which he resided in Penn- 
sylvania for some time and then removed to 
Ohio, passing the closing years of his life at 
Troy, where his remains were interred. The 
mother of Meredith Nicholson gave effective 
service as a nurse in the South during the 
progress of the War of the Rebellion, and she 
is now living in Indianapolis, having the rev- 
rent affection of all who have come within the 



sphere of her gracious influence. Of her two 
children, the subject of this sketch is the elder, 
and his sister Margaret is the wife of Robert 
Peclle Noble, of Indianapolis. 

Meredith Nicholson was five years of age at 
the time the family removed to Indianapolis, 
where he was reared to maturity and where he 
attended the public schools until lie had com- 
pleted a portion of the first year's work in the 
high school. Thereafter he was variously em-, 
ployed, having partially mastered the mysteries 
of the "art preservative of arts", and also hav- 
ing learned stenography. At this period in his 
career there was slight indication that he was 
destined to achieve so much of distinction in 
the field of literature, but in a perspective view 
it can be seen that his varied experience had 
much to do with fortifying him for effective 
literary work. When nineteen years of age he 
began the study of law in the office of the firm 
of Dye & Pishbaek, and later he continued his 
technical reading under the able preeeptorship 
of the late William Wallace, to whom a memoir 
is dedicated on other pages of this work. While 
a law student he began writing and he showed 
a natural predilection for this line of endeavor, 
with the result that he soon became identified 
with newspaper work in Indianapolis. After a 
year on the Sentinel he was for somewhat more 
than a decade, from 1885 to 1897, a valued 
and versatile member of the editorial staff of 
the Indianapolis News. Thereafter he devoted 
one year to the stock-brokerage business and 
he then went to Colorado, where for three years 
he held the dual position of auditor and treas- 
urer of a coal mining corporation. At the 
expiration of this time he returned to Indian- 
apolis and it may be considered fortunate in- 
deed that he has since devoted his entire time 
to literary" work. His first production was 
"Short Flights" (poems), which was published 
in 1891, and then followed in consecutive or- 
der "The Hoosiers" (historical), "The Main 
Chance", "Zelda Dameron", "The House of a 
Thousand Candles", "The Port of Missing 
Men", "Rosalind at Red Gate" and "The Lit- 
tle Brown Jug at Kildare". In the autumn of 
1909 was published his attractive novel, "The 
Lords of High Decision". Appreciative recog- 
nition of his accomplishment in his chosen field 
of endeavor was that accorded by Wabash Col- 
lege, in 1897, when he received therefrom the 
degree of Master of Arts, and in 1901 a further 
tribute was paid him bv this institution, which 
conferred upon him the honorary degree of 
Doctor of Letters. ^Ir. Nicholson is a mem- 
ber of the Phi Beta Kappa and of the Phi 
Gamma Delta. He is an inheritance member 
of the Military Order of th^ Loyal Legion, 
the Societv of the Sons of the American Revo- 



654 



HISTOKY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



lution, and is identified with various civic and 
social organizations of representative charac- 
ter in his home city. In politics he accords 
stanch allegiance to the Democratic party and 
his religious faith is that of 'the Episcopal 
Church. In 1906 Mr. Nicholson arranged a 
collection of his verses' in a volume entitled 
"Poems", the same being made up partly of 
productions which had -appeared from time to 
time in the Century, Harper's and the Atlantic 
Monthly. His essays on social, literary and 
political subjects have appeared frequently in 
the Atlantic and elsewhere. The published 
works of Mr. Nicholson are too well known to 
require more definite mention in this article. 

On the 16th of June, 1896, Mr. Nicholson 
was married to Miss Eugenie Kountze, a 
daughter of Herman Kountze, an influential 
citizen of Omaha, Nebraska. They have three 
children— Elizabeth Kountze, Meredith Junior 
and Lionel. Mrs. Nicholson's mother was the 
daughter of Thomas Davis, of Sinker & Davis, 
a firm that has had a continuous e.xistence in 
Indianapolis for half a century. 

Charles S. Grout. In the field of prac- 
tical benevolence and organized charity, Charles 
S. Grout has been able to accomplish a most 
beneficent work, and it has been his to attain 
a high reputation in this province, to which 
he has devoted many years of service as an 
executive and administrative officer, being at 
the present time general secretary of the Char- 
ity Organization Society of Indianapolis, whose 
headquarters are at 306 North Delaware street. 
He has given close study to the work which 
has thus engrossed his attention, has exerted 
much influence in the amelioration of suffer- 
ing and distress in the capital city, and is a 
citizen to whom is accorded the fullest meas- 
ure of popular confidence and rega'rd. 

Mr. Grout is a scion of families founded in 
New England in the early colonial epoch of 
our national history, and his genealogy in the 
agnatic line is of German origin ; in the ma- 
ternal line of stanch English extraction. 
Though reared among the green and rugged 
hills of Vermont. Mr. Grout claims Iowa as 
the place of his nativitv, as he was born on a 
farm near the city of Dubuque, that state, on 
the .Slst of August. 1859, being a son of Will- 
iam W. and Augusta A. (Spaulding) Grout. 
William Wirt Grout was born on the old fam- 
ily homestead near Cavendish. Windsor County. 
Vermont, and there the major portion of his 
long and useful life was passed. His death 
occurred on the farm which was his birth- 
place and he was about seventy-three years of 
age when he was summoned to the life eternal. 
He was a son of Daniel and Lucy (Adams') 
Grout, both of whom were likewise natives of 



the old Green Mountain State, where their 
entire lives were spent and where the father 
followed the great basic industry of agriculture. 
Augusta A. (Spaulding) Grout was .likewise 
born and reared in Vermont, and there her 
death occurred when she was about thirty-nine 
years of age. Both she and her husband were 
devout members of the Baptist Church, and the 
latter gave his allegiance to the Whig party 
until the organization of the Republican party, 
when he transferred his support to the latter, 
of whose principles he ever afterward contin- 
ued a stalwart advocate. Of the five children 
the subject of this sketch and his sister, Lucy 
A., now deceased, were born in Iowa, and the 
other three were born after the return to Ver- 
mont. One of the number died in infancy; 
Elsie is now the wife of Edward N. Woodbury 
and they reside in Mitchel County, Kansas; 
and Augusta is the wife of Edward Crawlev, 
of Wichita, that state. William W. Grout be- 
came one of the pioneers of Iowa, where he 
secured a tract of government land and ini- 
tiated the work of developing a farm, but he 
became dissatisfied with conditions in that sec- 
tion . of the linion and returned to the old 
homestead in Vermont after a few years' resi- 
dence in the Hawkeye state. 

Charles Spaulding Grout, the immediate 
subject of this review, was a child of about 
two years at the time of the family removal 
from Iowa to Veimont, and he was reared to 
maturity on the old Grout homestead farm, 
to whose work he early began to contribute 
his assistance, in the meanwhile duly availing 
himself of the privileges offered in the public 
schools of the locality. At the age of eighteen 
years he was matriculated in Black River 
Academy, at Ludlow, Vermont, in which well 
ordered institution he was graduated as a mem- 
ber of the class of 1881. Immediately after 
his graduation, at the ' Suggestion of Mila F. 
Ritzinger, of Indianapolis, who was tempora- 
rily residing in Ludlow, he came to this city, 
where he assumed the position of salesman in 
a tea store. About one year later he was given 
the position of timekeeper of the Atlas Engine^ 
Works, with which concern he continued for 
a period of eleven years. 

In the autumn " of 1893 Mr. Grout was 
chosen incumbent of his present office of gen- 
eral secretary of the Charity Organization So- 
ciety of Indianapolis, and to its administrative 
and practical affairs he has since given his 
attention, bringing to bear marked capacity 
for the handling of the manifold details of the 
benevolences of the organization and showing 
that deeper human sympathy which transcends 
mere sentiment to become an actuating motive 
and the producer of definite results in the 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



655 



succor and aid of "those in any way afflicted 
in mind, body or estate". He was also the 
organizer of the Mutual Service Association, 
in 1903, a corporate organization of young 
women and one which purchased and has ef- 
fectively developed the Mutual Service Park, 
devoted to co-operative work in an outing and 
boarding home for working young women. A 
noteworthy outgrowth of Mr. Grout's work as 
general secretary of the Charity Organization 
Society is the Fairview Settlement, one of the 
noble institutions of the capital city. This 
social settlement, organized and conducted ac- 
cording to the most approved system of prac- 
tical helpfulness, has as its purpose the pro- 
viding of houses rent free for mothers support- 
ing families through their own efforts, and 
none can doubt the beneficence of this work, 
as it enables such devoted women to make 
proper provision for their children and give 
them educational and other advantages which 
^vculd otherwise be in the realm of the impos- 
sible. Mr. Grout's service has been one that 
may well be designated as consecrated, and he 
is constantly studying ways and means to 
further the work committed to his charge, hav- 
ing a high sense of his stewardship and an 
abiding human tolerance and sympathy. It 
should be stated that the Charity Organization 
Society is an incorporated institution and has 
for its object the bringing together of the 
charitable efforts in the city and the developing 
of such agencies as tend to be of the greatest 
good to our poorer people. 

Loyal and public-spirited as a citizen, Mr. 
Grout takes a deep interest in all that concerns 
the progress and prosperity of his home city 
and he gives his influence and aid in support 
of all measures and enterprises tending to con- 
.serve the general welfare of the community. 
Though never desirous of entering the arena 
of practical politics and never a seeker of 
political office, he is a stanch supporter of the 
cause of the Republican party in a generic 
way, though in local affairs, where no issues 
are involved, he gives his support to men and 
measures meeting the approval of his judg- 
ment, irrespective of partisan lines. Both he 
and his wife are zealous and valued members 
of the North Park Christian Church. 

Mr. Grout has been twice married. In 1888 
was solemnized his union to Miss Minnie F. 
Staggs, daughter of Mrs. Sarah F. Staggs, of 
Riverside, California, and she was summoned 
to the life eternal in 1890, leaving no children. 
-In 1892 Mr. Grout was united in marriage to 
Miss Emma Doran, who was bom and reared 
in Indianapolis, and who is a daughter of 
William M. E. Doran. Mr. and Mrs. Grout 



hiive no children of their own, but adopted 
four, one of whom has died. 

William H. Thomas, M. D. In both the 
paternal and maternal lines the honored sub- 
ject of this memoir was a scion of pioneer fam- 
ilies of Indiana, and in his native common- 
wealth it was his to gain much of distinction 
as a physician and surgeon and to hold the 
inviolable confidence and esteem of all who 
kne-«' him. He was for many years one of the 
best known and leading representatives of his 
profession in the City of Indianapolis and here 
he continued in active and successful practice 
until the time of his death, which occurred on 
the 30th of September, 1903, only a few weeks 
prior to his seventieth birthday anniversary. 
He served with utmost loyalty as a gallant 
soldier of the Union during the greater por- 
tion of the Civil War, and in all the varied 
associations of the "piping times of peace" 
his loyalty and fidelity were of the same in- 
sistent type, making him a strong and noble 
character and a citizen whose influence ever 
worked for good. 

Dr. William H. Thomas was bom at Water- 
loo, Dekalb County, Indiana, on the 22d of 
November, 1833, and was a son of Hewit L. 
and Charlotte C. (Helm) Thomas, the former 
of whom was a native of the State of New 
York and the latter of Kentucky. They be- 
came the parents of three children, all of whom 
are now deceased and of whom the subject of 
this sketch was the youngest. Hewit L. Thomas 
was a son of Lyman Thomas, and was about 
eight years of age at the time of the . family 
removal from the old Empire State to Fayette 
County, Indiana, where his father was a pio- 
neer, there continuing to reside until his death, 
at a venerable age. Dr. William Helm, the 
matemal grandfather of Dr. Thomas, was a 
native of Virginia and a scion of one of the 
patrician families of the historic Old Dominion. 
From Kentucky he came to Indiana in an early 
day and he was one of the sterling pioneers 
of Fayette Coimty, where he died at an ad- 
vanced age, having reared a large family of 
children. He was one of the early physicians 
of Fayette County, and there lived up to the 
full tension of the strenuous labors devolving 
upon a member of his profession in a pioneer 
community. He served in the Indian war 
in the early days and was an influential citizen 
of the county which long constituted his home. 

Hewit L. Thomas was reared to manhood 
in Fayette County, this state, where he received 
a common-school education and where his early 
discipline was that secured in connection with 
the work of his father's pioneer farm. Some 
time during the early thirties. Mr. Thomas re- 
moved to Cass County, this state, where he 



Go6 



HISTORY OF GKEATER IXDIANAPOLIS. 



engaged in agricultural pursuits. In 1855 he 
ruinoved to ilinuesota and established his home 
at Afton, \\'ashington County, where he be- 
came a prominent and influential citizen. He 
there served as associate judge, and during the 
administration of President Lincoln he served 
as a member of the committee of three ap- 
pointed b}- the president to adjust some In- 
dian claims in Minnesota. After the close of 
the Civil War Judge Thomas returned to In- 
diana, taking up his residence in Galveston, 
Cass County, where he passed the residue of 
his life, which was prolonged to the patriarchal 
age of ninety-one years. His widow, surviving 
him by two years, was ninety .years of age at 
the time of her demise. Both were devout 
members of the Baptist Church, in which he 
long held the office of deacon. 

Dr. William 11. Thomas was three years of 
age at the time of his parents' removal to Cass 
County, where he was reared to maturity and 
where his early educational advantages were 
those afforded by the primitive subscription 
schools, in which he had as an instructor for 
some time his father, who devoted himself to 
teaching during the winter terms at varj-ing 
intervals. 

In 1854. when twenty-one years of age. Dr. 
Thomas celebrated the attaining of his legal 
majority by taking unto himself a wife, and in 
the following year he removed with his par- 
ents and his bride to Minnesota, where he 
found employment at the tinners trade, which 
he had previously learned. With the thunder- 
ing of .rebel guns against the ramparts of old 
Fort Sumter his patriotism was roused, and he 
was not long in tendering his services in de- 
fense of the Union. In 1863 he enlisted as a 
private in Company C. Seventh Minnesota 
Volunteer Infantry, and with this gallant 
command he continued in active service, 
through a period of three years and eight days, 
marked by varied and arduous operations, 
terminating his association with his regiment 
only -when the war closed and peace was de- 
clared. He advanced through the various 
grades of promotion until he became captain 
of the company in which he had enlisted as a 
private, and he proved a gallant and popular 
commanding officer. His regiment first saw 
service in the northwest and took part in bat- 
tle with the T.ittle Crow Indians at the foot of 
the Black Hills. The regiment was finally 
sent from the northwest to Memphis. Tennessee, 
and in that state it took part in the battle of 
Tupelo. The following winter was passed at 
East Point. ^Mississippi, from which place it 
moved forward and assisted in the investment 
of the City of ^Mobile. Tt was in action in the 
heaviest battle at that point and also partici- 



pated in many minor battles and skirmishes, 
after which it was found taking a valiant part 
in the historic aud sanguinary battle of Nash- 
ville. From the latter city the regiment went 
to Jackson, Mississippi, where it was assigned 
to garrison duty and where it remained until 
the close of the war. The command was mus- 
tered out at Fort Snelling, Minnesota, and its 
members duly received their honorable dis- 
charges. The regiment was in command of 
Col. William Marshall, and the same was 
in service as a part of the Sixteenth Army 
Corps, under Gen. Andrew J. Smith. -Dr. 
Thomas ever retained a deep interest in his 
' old comrades and signified the same by his 
membership in the Grand Army of the Re- 
public. 

After the close of the war Captain Thomas 
returned to Cass County, Indiana, and located 
in the village of Galveston, where he engaged 
in the tin and stove business, to which he de- 
voted his attention for several years, at t^e 
expiration of which he sold the business and 
removed to Indianapolis, where he took up the 
study of medicine and where he finally com- 
pleted the prescribed course in the Indiana 
^ledical College, from which well ordered insti- 
tution he received his degree of Doctor of 
Medicine. Thereafter he continuously followed 
the work of his exacting profession in this city 
until the close of his long and useful life, and 
it is said of him that during the long interven- 
ing period not even a week marked his with- 
drawal from the active labors of his profes- 
sion, as his final illness was of very brief dura- 
tion. About five years after his graduation 
the Central College of Physicians and Sur- 
geons was organized and he became one of the 
founders of this stanch institution, which con- 
tinued in effective work imtil it was merged 
with the present medical department of the 
University of Indiana-. He was a member of 
the original faculty of the college, serving as 
demonstrator of anatomy during the first four 
years and thereafter lecturing on various other 
technical subjects. His last incumbency was 
that of the chair of nervous diseases, and dur- 
ing all these years of service no member of the 
faculty held a higher place in the esteem of 
the student body or the confidence of the as- 
sociate members of governing body of the in- 
stitution. The doctor devoted his attention to 
general practice and gained high prestige and 
marked success as a physician. He retained a 
representative clientage and ever commanded 
the high regard of his professional confreres. 
He was a valued member of the Indiana State 
Medical Society and the Marion County^ Med- 
ical Society. ■ In politics he was a stalwart ad- 
herent of the Republican party and while ever 



HISTOBY OF GREATEK INDIANAPOLIS. 



657 



mowing a vital interest in public affairs, and 
■standing exponent of loyal and liberal eitizen- 
.-hip, lie never sought or desired political office 
of any order. 

On the 16th of October, 1854, was solemnized 
the marriage of Dr. Thomas to Miss Ann M. 
Copeland, who was born in Hull, England, 
whence her parents removed to America when 
she was a child, finally settling in Indiana, 
where they passed the remainder of their lives. 
Dr. and Mrs. Thomas became tlie parents of 
one child, Edwin C, who is now a representa- 
tive physician and surgeon of Indianapolis 
and of whom individual mention is made on 
other pages of this volume. Mrs. Thomas was 
summoned to the life eternal on the 9th of 
Aprilj 1900, at the age of seventy-one years, 
and her memory is revered by all who came 
within the sphere of her gracious influence. 
In May, 1901, Dr. Thomas contracted a sec- 
ond marriage, being then united to Mrs. Polly 
(Tucker) Wysong, who survives him. 

Charles E. Wright, M. D. It was given 
Dr. Wright to attain marked distinction as a 
physician and surgeon and as a writer and 
author in the line of his profession. He was 
a prominent figure in the educational work of 
his chosen calling, was a recognized authority 
in his specialty — the diseases of the eye, ear 
and nose — and was a man of the loftiest per- 
sonal integrity and honor. He was in the most 
significant sense the architect of his own for- 
tunes, and in gaining so great distinction and 
success he showed the will to do and to dare, 
so that he prpved himself equal to the sur- 
mounting of obstacles that would have com- 
passed the overthrow and discouragement of a 
man of less determination, pluck and perse- 
verance. The word failure found no place in 
his vocabulary, and thus he worked forward to 
the goal of success along many lines. He was 
a man of singular simplicity of manners, seem- 
ingly unconscious of his intellectual superior- 
ity and ever free from professional bigotry or 
personal intolerance. He well merited the 
proud American title of self-made man, and his 
services to humanity were such as to justify 
him a place among the world's benefactors and 
practical philanthropists, though he himself, 
with characteristic modesty, would never have 
claimed such priority. In his death, at his 
home in Indianapolis, on the 22d of February, 
189.3, there passed awav one of the most emi- 
nent and honored representatives of the medi- 
cal profession in Indiana, and a citizen who 
was loved for his many generous attributes 
of character. 

Charles Edward Wright was bom on a farm 
that is now within the city limits of Indian- 
apolis, on the 1st of November, 1843, and it is 



worthy of note that the old homestead was lo- 
cated on East Washington street, where his 
parents settled in the pioneer days when the 
capital city was but a village. The doctor was 
a son of Willis Wright, who was born in the 
Ci\y of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and who 
was a scion of stanch English stock. The par- 
ents continued to reside in Indiana until their 
death. Dr. Wright passed his boyhood days 
on the home farm, and early began to lend his 
aid in its work, and in the meanwhile his edu- 
cational advantages were most limited. When 
fourteen years of age he left the parental roof 
and went to Nashville, Tennessee, where he 
found employment through which he was able 
to defray the expenses of further school work. 
His ambition for a liberal education was one of 
definite action, and finally he found it possi- 
ble to enter the old Asbury University, now De- 
Pauw University, at Greencastle, Indiana, 
where he completed his academic studies. In 
preparation for the work of his chosen profes- 
sion he was finally matriculated in the Medical 
College of Ohio at Cincinnati, in which he com- 
pleted the prescribed course and was graduated 
in March, 1868, duly receiving his well earned 
degree of Doctor of Medicine, and thus finding 
himself at last admirably fortified for the du- 
ties and responsibilities of life, whose prior bat- 
tles he had found stern and formidable. 

Immediately after his graduation Dr. Wright 
took up his residence in Indianapolis, his na- 
tive city, and here he ever afterward continued 
in the successful work of his profession, which 
he honored and dignified by his distinguished 
ability and splendid services. For many years 
he devoted special attention to the diseases of 
the eye, ear and nose, and he became a recog- 
nized authority in this field of practice, in 
which his success was of the most imequivocal 
order. He was a profound student of his pro- 
fession and indefatigable in his individual re- 
search and experimentation, so that it was but 
natural, with his great intellectual power, that 
he should achieve a secure place as one of the 
essentially representative members of his pro- 
fession in the United States. He was a valued 
member of the Indiana Academy of Science, of 
which he served as secretary in 1868. He was 
also one of the active and valued members of 
the Indiana State Jledical Society, the Marion 
County Jledical Society and other localized pro- 
fessional and scientific bodies, besides which he 
was identified with the American Medical As- 
sociation and various scientific organzations of 
national and international scope. He was one 
of the founders of the Indiana Medical Col- 
lege, in which he eventually became professor 
of materia medica and therapeutics, as well as 
special lecturer on the diseases of the eye and 



658 



HISTOEY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



ear. For some time he was secretary of the 
college and later he was its president for sev- 
eral years. He did much to further the up- 
building of the excellent institution, which was 
eventually merged with others in the Med- 
ical Department of the University of Indiana. 
Innumerable demands were made upon the 
time and attention of Dr.- Wright in a purely 
professional capacity and aside from his ex- 
tensive and representative private practice. He 
was a member of the mfidieal staff of the Indian- 
apolis City Hospital, was physician to St. Vin- 
cent's Hospital and for four years was attend- 
ing physician to the state institution for the 
blind in Indianapolis. In 1875-6 he was pres- 
ident of the Indiana State Board of Health, 
and in 1877-8 he was president of the Indiana 
Medico-Legal Fraternity. 

During the progress of the Civil War, Dr. 
Wright was called into service as quartermas- 
ter's sergeant in the camp of instruction in 
Indianapolis, and later he became superintend- 
ent of the commissary stores at Nashville, Ten- 
nessee, and afterward served as chief commis- 
sary clerk of the subsistence department of the 
Union Army, in the Department of Kentucky. 
In July, 1878, in the military service of the 
state. Dr. Wright was appointed surgeon gen- 
eral on the staff of Governor Williams, with the 
rank of colonel. For a long period he was chief 
of the m,edical staff of St. Vincent's Hospital, 
and he was also superintendent of the state in- 
sane asylum in Indianapolis. The doctor made 
many and valuable contributions to the stand- 
ard and periodical literature of his profession, 
and these contributions continued to mark the 
entire period of his active professional career. 
His thesis on "Spontaneous Evolution" was 
published in the Western Journal of Medicine 
in March, 1868; his reports of the diseases of 
the eye and ear appeared in the published rec- 
ords of the Indiana State Medical Society. 
1870-77. He was for some time editor-in-chief 
of the Indiana Medical Journal, to which his 
contributions were many and of great general 
interest to the members of his profession. The 
doctor was a man of fine literary taste, and in 
the midst of the many exactions of his profes- 
sional work he found time to carry his reading 
over a remarkably wide range and to take an 
active part in the affairs of local literary cir- 
cles. He was president of the Scottish Rite 
Dramatic Association of Indianapolis from tlic 
time of its organization until his deatli, ami 
was otherwise a vital factor in the promotion 
of literary and dramatic study and work in his 
home city. He was passionately fond of the 
drama, and gained a reputation as an amateur 
actor. He was also a great lover of books and 
a collector of old volumes, and was well in- 



formed on the many works which adorned his 
walls. In the time-honored Masonic fraternity 
he achieved the supreme honor, in receiving the 
thirty-third degree of the Ancient Accepted 
Scottish Rite, and he was one of the most ap- 
preciative affiliates of both the York and Scot- 
tish Rite bodies in Indianapolis. He was iden- 
tified also with the Knights of Pythias, in which 
he was medical examiner. He was fond of 
fishing , and extremely fond of horses, owning 
at various times thoroughbred stock. 

It was but natural that a man of such broad 
mental ken and such intense individuality 
should be well fortified in his views as to mat- 
ters of public polity and should take a deep 
interest in all that touched the welfare of the 
community. In politics the doctor accorded 
an unswerving allegiance to the Democratic 
])arty, and in religious matters he was non- 
sectarian, being liberal and tolerant in his at- 
titude toward all denominations and having a 
true reverence for the spiritual verities as well 
as for the faith that makes faithful in connec- 
tion with the every-day life of men. He was 
generous, genial, democratic and kindly, sure 
of himself and loyal to what he believed the 
right, so that he never compromised with wrong 
or injustice, no matter how attractively or 
>ubtly presented. He never lacked the cour- 
age of his convictions, and he had no toler- 
ance for equivocation or double dealing, deceit 
or dishonesty. He was himself sincere and out- 
spoken, and petty trickery' and malice brought 
forth his unreser^-ed expressions of contempt. 
He made life count for good in its every rela- 
tion, and those who knew the man as he was 
will long cherish his memory. He was equipped 
with the elements of greatness, and he showed 
this in his professional achievement, his strong 
and noble manhood and his gracious and kind- 
Iv deeds. 

" On the 1st of November, 1870, Dr. Wright 
was united in marriage to Miss Anna Haugh. 
who was bom and reared in Indianapolis and 
who is a representative of one of the old and 
lionored families of the state. She still re- 
sides in Indianapolis, and in her attractive 
home continues to extend a gracious and re- 
fined hospitality to her wide circle of friends. 
Dr. and Mrs. Wright became the parents of 
two ch.ildren, — Charlotte, who is now the wife 
of Edmund F. Gall, of Indianapolis, and 
Charles Edward, who was graduated in the In- 
diana 'Medical College, but who withdrew from 
the practice of medicine to enter the dramatic 
profession, in which he has achieved definite 
success. 

John- B-«rett Cockrum, specially known as 
the able general attorney for the Lake Erie and 
Western Railway, with "related lines, is gener- 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



G.59 



ally recognized as one of the leading corpora- 
tion lawyers of Indianapolis and the state, as 
well as a general practitioner, with a notable 
private and public record, and a Republican of 
activity and wide influence. Both his grand- 
father and his father were marked men in 
southern Indiana — the former as a pioneer 
legislator and one of the founders of the Re- 
publican party, and the latter, especially as a 
gallant and popular officer of the Civil War. 
John B., who was born on a farm near Oak- 
land City, Indiana, September 12, 1857, is of 
Scotch-Irish ancestry. His grandfather, James 
W. Cockrum, was a native of North Carolina, 
but at an early day entered government land 
in what is now Gibson County, Indiana, and 
became one of the leading citizens in that por- 
tion of the state. He laid out the town of 
Oakland (afterward a city and the birthplace 
of John B.), and in 1851 was elected to the 
thirty-sixth session of the state assembly as a 
representative from Gibson County. In this 
capacity he served as a Whig, and a few years 
later became one of the most ardent organizers 
of the Republican party in southern Indiana, 
giving it his hearty support as long as he lived. 
William M. Cockrum, the father, absorbed 
these political tendencies and was himself an 
enthusiastic Republican, as well as a success- 
ful farmer and a leading citizen; a strong 
man, intellectually and morally. The latter 
traits made him the brave and efficient soldier 
that he was. In the Civil War he served as 
Lieutenant- Colonel of the Forty-second In- 
diana Infantry, and received so severe a wound 
on the battlefield of Chickamauga that he was 
obliged to remain in a temporary hospital on 
the scene of action for seventeen days. He 
was then removed to Libby prison, where he 
was confined for seven months, and at his ex- 
change again entered the service, serving un- 
til the close of the war. It was a public ac- 
knowledgment of his bravery and fidelity as a 
soldier when Governor Matthews appointed 
him to the Indiana commission which superin- 
tended the erection of the monuments to the 
state regiments at Chickamauga Park. He is 
kindly and gratefully remembered both for his 
virtues and as the author of an interesting and 
reliable work compris.ing early reminiscences 
of Indiana. 

John B. Cockrum was educated in the Oak- 
land City schools, graduating from its high 
school at the age of seventeen and commencing 
to teach in the country institutions of Gib- 
son County. The latter avocation was pursued 
only during the winter months, the summer 
months being devoted to the studv of law in 
the office of" Hon. J. E. McCullough. then of 
Princeton, Indiana, now of Indianapolis. Sub- 
Vol. II— 2 



sequently Mr. Cockrum entered the Cincinnati 
Law School, from which he graduated in 
April, 1879. 

Immediately after his graduation in law 
and his admission to the bar, Mr. Cockrum 
commenced practice at Booneville, Warrick 
County, Indiana, where he formed a partner- 
ship with Charles W. Armstrong, under the 
name of Armstrong and Cockrum. The firm 
continued unchanged until 1882, when John 
B. Handy retired from the Circuit bench and 
liecame senior member of Handy. Armstrong 
and Cockrum. Of this active and strong co- 
partnership Mr. Cockrum remained a member 
\mtil his appointment to the position of as- 
sistant United States Attorney for Indiana, in 
March, 1889. His four vears of able service 
in that office were followed in March, 1893, bv 
the commencement of his identification with 
the Lake Erie and Western Railroad in the 
capacity' of assistant general attornev. In 
June, 1895, he was appointed to the head of 
>*-s Ipcral department, having under his profes- 
sional supervision also the Fort Wayne, Cin^ 
ninnati and Louisville and the Northern Ohio 
Railroads, which were operated by the Lake 
Erie and Western management. 

Ardent and unswerving as a Ronublican, Mr. 
Cockrum has alwavs been an active organizer 
and a valued speaker for his partv, but the 
only marked official honors which he has ac- 
cepted were as a delesrate from the First In- 
diana Congressional District to the national 
convention of 1888 which nominated Benjamin 
Harrison for the presidency, and he was also 
elected and served as a delegate from the Sev- 
enth Congressional District of Indiana in the 
national convention that nominated Theodore 
Roosevelt for president. Mr. Cockrum has be- 
come widely known in the fraternities. He is 
a thirty-third degree Scottish Rite Mason and 
a Shriner; as one of the leading members of 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows was 
very active in the erection of their magnificent 
home in Indianapolis. He was elected at 
Seattle in 1909 as deputy grand sire of the 
Sovereign Grand Lodge, I. 0. 0. F., this be- 
ing the governing body of the order in the 
whole world. In September, 1910, at Atlanta, 
Georgia, if the usual plan is followed he will 
he elevated to the position of ffrand sire, which 
■s the highest executive office in the Sovereign 
Grand Lodge and which position he will hold 
for two years. He is also closely identified 
with the progress of the Knights of P^'thias 
and has served many years a« chief tribune 
of the Grand Tribunal of Indiana. He is a 
member of the Benevolent and Protective Or- 
der of Elks, and of many of the local clubs 
and social organizations. He was president of 



660 



HISTORY OF GKEATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



the Columbia Club at the time of the erection 
of the new club house in Indianapolis. In 
1880 he married 2kliss Fannie C. BittrofE, of 
Evansville, Indiana, and their children are Mrs. 
Arthur C. Downing of Indianapolis and Oat- 
ley B. Cockrum, assistant general land and 
tax agent of the New York Central lines in 
Chicago. 

John E. Shideleh. One of the well known 
and distinctively popular officials connected 
with the Indianapolis postoffice is John E. 
Shideler, who is incumbent of the office of as- 
sistant postmaster. He has held this incum- 
bency for more than a decade and it is not in 
the least inconsistent to say that no man iden- 
tified with the local mail service is more thor- 
oughly familiar with the manifold details per- 
taining thereto than is he. He has given most 
effective service in his responsible office and 
the most effective evidence of this fact is that 
afforded by his long tenure of the position. 
He has passed the major portion of his life 
in the Hoosier capital and is here held in high 
esteem in both business and social circles.- 

John E. Shideler was bom on a farm in 
Mill township, Grant County, Indiana, on the 
20th of Februarv, 1859. and is a son of David 
B. and Anna (Greer) Shideler. His father 
likewise was born in Grant County, being a 
son of Aaron Shideler, who was of stanch 
Pennsylvania German stock and a representa- 
tive of a family tliat was founded in the old 
Keystone commonwealth in the colonial epoch 
of "our national history. Aaron Shideler was 
bom in Preble County. Ohio, where his father 
settled in the pioneer days, and he himself be- 
came one of the sterling and honored pioneers 
of Grant County, Indiana, where he took up 
his residence as early as the year 1833 and 
where both he and his wife passed the residue 
of their lives. He reclaimed a farm from the 
virgin forest and became one of the substan- 
tial citizens of that section of the state. 

David B. Shideler was reared and educated 
in Grant County, and there was solemnized hi-^ 
marriage to Miss Anna Greer, who was born in 
Ireland and who was a child at the time of 
her parents' immigration to America. When 
the subject of this review was a child his par- 
ents removed to the village of Jonesboro, in 
Grant County, where his father was engaged 
in the general merchandise business for sev- 
eral years. While in Jonesboro Mrs. Shideler 
died, her son l)eing three years old at the time. 
David Shideler married as his second wife 
Sarah Eviston, of Grant County, and she be- 
came the mother of Hon. George A. H. Shide- 
ler, of Marion, the onlv other member of the 
family. On the 24th of April, 1874, after a 
residence of a vear and a half in Muncie, In- 



diana, the family established their home in 
Indianapolis, and here the father engaged in 
the life insurance business, with which he was 
long and prominently identified, principally as 
general agent for the Equitable Life Assur- 
ance Society, of the U. S. He continued to 
be associated with the management of the local 
business of this company until his death, which 
occurred on the 31st of January, 1904. 

John E. Shideler secured his earliest educa- 
tional training in the public school at Jones- 
boro and later continued in the schools of the 
City of Muncie, where the family took up their 
abode in 1872. There it was his privilege to 
gain discipline in connection with the printing 
and publishing business — a training that has 
well been called equivalent to a liberal educa- 
tion. He served a practical apprenticeship as 
a compositor in the office of the old Muncie 
Times, and became a skilled exponent of the 
"art preservative of all arts", so that upon the 
removal to Indianapolis, in 1874, .he readily 
secured employment at his trade. It may be 
noted that a fellow apprentice of his in the 
Times office in Muncie was Hon. Perry S. 
Heath, who later became first assistant post- 
master general of the L^^nited States. From 
IS' 4 until 1877 Mr. Shideler followed the 
work of his trade in Indianapolis, having been 
employed in the printing establishment of 
Wright, Baker & Company, then one of the 
leading concerns of its kind in the city. Al- 
bert R. Baker, a member of this firm, took a 
deep and kindly interest in young Shideler 
and became one of his stanch friends. The 
a.<sistant postmaster recalls with sentiments of 
deep appreciation and gratitude the many fa- 
vors extended to him by Mr. Baker, who did 
much to aid him in a material way and by the 
offering of well tim.ed counsel. It has always 
been a source of pride to Mr. Shideler that 
$65,000 of life insurance placed on the life of 
Albert R. Baker at Mr. Shideler's solicitation 
furnished the ready money at his death that 
saved his estate to his family. Mr. Shideler 
felt he could justly claim that as being a par- 
tial repayment of Mr. Bakers early kindness 
to him. 

In 1877 ^Ir. Shideler became associated with 
his father in the insurance business, and he 
continued to be identified with the line of en- 
terprise, as representative of the Equitable Life 
Assurance Society, for more than a score of 
years, within which he made a splendid record 
as an underwriter and as an able executive. 
He was most successful in this line of enter- 
prise and insistently maintains that one of the 
most beneficent forces that has entered into 
and permeated modern civilization is that of 
well ordered life insurance. He holds that its 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



functions are in the protection of those who 
are nearest and dearest to the individual per- 
son and that thus they touch the home — that 
conservator of all that is best and most endur- 
ing in the scheme of human existence. Mr., 
Shideler continued to be actively engaged in 
the life insurance business until he accepted 
his present office of assistant postmaster, in 
Febi-uary, 1898, as has already been noted in 
this context. He has done much to bring about 
the admirable systematization of the work of 
the postoffice in Indianapolis and proved of 
special influence in this direction when the of- 
fice was removed to the present magnificent 
federal building, in 1905. 

In politics Mr. Shideler has ever given an 
unqualified allegiance to the Republican party 
and has shown a zealous interest in the pro- 
motion of its cause. He and his wife hold 
membership in the Tabernacle Presbyterian 
Church and he is affiliated with Oriental Lodge 
No. 500, Free & Accepted Masons, besides hold- 
ing membership in a number of representative 
civic and social organizations in his home city. 

On the 17th of July, 1878, was solemnized 
the marriage of Mr. Shideler to Miss Alice 
Rutter, who was born and reared in the vil- 
lage of Wheeling, Delaware County, Indiana, 
where her father, the late John H. Rutter, was 
a physician of large general practice and a 
highly honored citizen. Mr. and Mrs. Shide- 
ler have four children, namely: DafEo B., 
Jackson E., Thaddeus R., and Hollie A., all 
of whom are identified with business interests 
in the City of Indianapolis. 

John A. Moriarty. A representative busi- 
ness man of the younger generation in his 
native city is John A. Moriarty, who is as- 
sistant general manager of the Indianapolis and 
New Long Distance Telephone Companies, and 
who was called to this responsible position 
through the appreciative estimate placed upon 
his services by the directors of this important 
corporation, which represents one of the valued 
public utilities of the capital city. 

Mr. Moriarty was bom in Indianapolis on 
the -Sd of October, 1873, and is a son of Will- 
iam C. and Emma (Reaume) Moriarty, the 
former of whom was born in Ireland and the 
latter in the Province of Ontario, Canada. Will- 
iam C. iUoriarty was eight years of age at the 
time of the family immigration to the United 
States, where he was reared and educated. He 
became specially skilled as an accountant, and 
as such was emploved for many years. He 
passed the major portion of his life in In- 
dianapolis, where his death occurred and where 
he ever -^mmanded unqualified confidence and 
esteem as a man of fine attributes of charac- 
ter and as a citizen of utmost lovalty. His 



widow now makes her home with her son John 
A., whose name initiates this article. 

John A. Moriarty gained his early education 
in the public schools of the old Third ward of 
Indianapolis and thereafter studied stenog- 
raphy and typewriting, which he followed as a 
vocation for a time, after which he was en- 
gaged in clerical work in local railway service 
for a few years. Upon retiring from this line 
of endeavor he entered the employ of the In- 
dianapolis Telephone Company, in the capac- 
ity of contract agent. After a period of about 
four years he withdrew from his position with 
this company, but he soon returned to its 
service, with which he has since been continu- 
ously identified and in connection with which 
he has done such excellent work as to gain 
the confidence and esteem of the interested 
principals in the corporation, as is evident in 
the official preferment conferred upon him in 
the position of which he has been incumbent 
since 1907 — that of assistant general manager. 
His promotion to this responsible office was a 
fitting recognition of the business acumen and 
executive ability he had demonstrated while 
previously in the service of the company. 

Mr. Moriarty has a wide circle of friends in 
the business and social circles of his native city, 
and effective voucher for his hold upon the 
esteem and good will of representative business 
men of Indianapolis is that signified in his elec- 
tion, in the spring of 1909, to the presidency 
of the Marion Club, the largest and most in- 
fluential political and social club of the In- 
diana capital and, indeed, of the state itself. 
The distinction involved is one of no insignifi- 
cant order, and Mr. Moriarty's election indi- 
cates not only his marked personal popularity 
but also that he has been a stalwart in the 
local camp of the Republican party, of whose 
principles and policies he is an ardent ad- 
vocate. 

JiDGE Charles Remstek is presiding with 
marked ability on the bench of the Marion 
circuit court and holds prestige as one of the 
representative jurists and legists of his native 
state. He gained distinctive success in his la- 
bors as one of the members of the bar of the 
capital city, and his elevation to his present im- 
portant judicial office was but a fitting recog- 
nition of his eligibility and his professional 
standing. His devotion to the law has been 
of insistent order, implying his appreciation of 
the fact that its demands are exacting and that 
success comes only to those who are willing to 
subordinate other interests and accord an un- 
qualified fealty and loyalty. Maker of his own 
opportunities and winner of his own advance- 
ment. Judge Remster well merits consideration 
among others who have lent dignitv and honor 



662 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



to the bench and bar of the fair capital citj^ 
to which this .historic work is devoted. 

Judge Remster was born on the homestead 
farm of the family, in Van Buren Township, 
Fountain County, Indiana, and the date of 
his nativity was July 28, 1862. He is a son 
of Andrew and Tamson (Smith) Ren^ster, 
both of whom were bom and reared in the 
State of New Jersey, where their marriasre 
was solemnized .January 6, 1848. Andrew 
Remster was a scion of sturdy Holland Dutch 
stock and his father, who immigrated from 
the City of Amsterdam, was the founder of 
the family in America. Mrs.. Tamson (Smith) 
Remster was of English lineage and the fam- 
ily was established in America prior to the 
War of the Revolution, in which her grand- 
father, John Smith, served as a captain in the 
Continental line. Andrew Remster came with 
his bride to the west soon after their marriage, 
and after remaining in Ohio about one year 
they removed to Indiana and settled in Fountain 
County, where he secured a tract of land and 
instituted the development of a farm. He 
died in 1865, when the subject of this re- 
view was but three years of age, and the wid- 
owed mother later became the wife of Benja- 
min Strader, who died six months later. Of 
the five children of the first marriage all are 
now living, as is also the one child of the sec- 
ond marriage. The devoted mother lived to 
a venerable age, loved and revered by all who 
came within the sphere of her gentle and 
gracious influence, and she passed the closing 
years of her life at Covington, Indiana, where 
she died in 1901. She was a devout member 
of the Baptist Church and her life was one of 
unselfish devotion to the happiness of those 
about her. 

Judge Charles Remster was reared to ma- 
turity on the home farm and to the district 
schools is he indebted for his early educational 
discipline, which was supplemented by a course 
in the Veedersburg high school, in which he 
R-as graduated as a member of the class of 
1882. He then entered Purdue University, at 
Lafayette, this state, in which institution he 
completed the work of the junior year, after 
which he withdrew and turned his attention to 
the reading of law, under the effective pre- 
ceptorship of a leading member of the bar at 
Veedersburg. He made rapid and substantial 
progress in the absorption and assimilation of 
the science of jurisprudence and in 1889 was 
duly admitted to the bar of his native state, 
in Fountain County. He maintained his resi- 
dence at Veedersburg and was one of the suc- 
cessful members of the Fountain County bar 
until 1895, when he removed to Indianapolis, 
finding in the capital city a wider sphere for 



efl'ective labor in his profession. He here 
gained a large and representative clientage and 
he has appeared in connection with much im- 
portant litigation in the federal and state 
courts, being known as a versatile and effective 
trial lawyer as well as a judicious and dis- 
criminating counsellor. ' He continued in the 
active general practice of his profession in In- 
dianapolis until his elevation to the bench, and 
at the time of his election to tliis high judicial 
otiice he was serving as assistant prosecuting 
attorney of Marion County, under Elliott R.' 
Hooton, the able incumbent of the office of 
county prosecutor. He was elected judge of 
the Marion circuit court in 1908, and he 
assumed the discharge of his official duties 
on the bench on the 11th of November of 
that year, having been elected for the reg- 
ular term of six years. The members of the 
bar and others who are familiar with his ad- 
ministration have naught but commendation 
for his able and equitable handling of the 
business of his tribunal, and not only has he 
shown a distinctive judicial acumen and a 
broad and exact knowledge of the minutise of 
the law and familiarity with precedents, but he 
has also carried forward the work of the court 
with facility, avoiding the accumulation of 
cases and the consequent burden of an over- 
loaded docket. Since he assumed office there 
have been few reversals of his decisions by the 
higher courts, and his course has been such 
as to gain to him a strong hold upon the con- 
fidence of the bar, those who have appeared 
as principals in cases submitted for his ad- 
judication, and the general public. In short, 
his course has amply justified the wisdom of 
those through whose suffrages he was elevated 
to the bench. 

In politics Judge Remster has ever been 
aligned as a stanch supporter of the principles 
and policies for which the Democratic party 
stands sponsor, and he has rendered loyal serv- 
ice in the promotion of the party cause. He 
is a member of the Indiana Democratic Club, 
of which lie served as president in 1907. In 
a fraternal way he is identified with the 
Knights of Pythias, and he is a member of tlie 
Indiana Bar Association and various other civic 
organizations. 

On tlie .30th of October, 1894, Judge Rem- 
ster was united in marriage to ^liss Isabelle 
^[cDaniol, who was bom and reared in Foun- 
tain County. Indiana, and who is a daughter 
of Samuel ifcDaniel, a representative farmer 
of that county. 

TiioM.vs B. E.\STMAX, M. D. In a profes- 
sion dignified and honored by the services of 
his father, the late Dr. Joseph Eastman, to 
whom a memoir is dedicated on other pages of 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



this volume, Dr. Thomas Barker Eastman has 
well upheld the professional prestige of the 
name which he bears,, and is now engaged in 
the practice of his profession in the capital 
city. 

Dr. Thomas B. Eastman was born at Browns- 
-Ijurg, Hendricks County, Indiana, on the 8th 
of April, 1869. As a review of the career of 
his father appears in this work, it is unneces- 
sary to repeat the genealogical data in the pres- 
ent sketch. Dr. Eastman secured his early edu- 
cational training in the public schools of In- 
dianapolis, and was then matriculated in Wa- 
bash College, in which institution he was grad- 
uated in 1890, with the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts. He forthwith entered the Central Col- 
lege of Physicians and Surgeons, of Indian- 
apolis, in which he was graduated as a mem- 
ber of the class of 1893, and from which he 
received his well-earned degree of Doctor of 
Medicine. In the practice of his chosen pro- 
fession his success has been on a parity with 
his recognized ability and he is one of ithe es- 
sentially representative physicians and sur- 
geons of "Greater Indianapolis." He is a mem- 
ber of the American Medical Association, the 
American Associatiqn of Obstetrics and Gyne- 
cology, the Indiana State Medical Society and 
the Marion County Medical Society. In poli- 
tics he accords stanch allegiance to the Repub- 
lican party and in the Masonic fraternity he 
has attained the thirty-second degree of the 
Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite, in which con- 
hection he is affiliated with Indiana Sovereign 
Consistory, Sublime Princes of the Royal Se- 
cret, and he also holds membership in Murat 
Temple, Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles of 
the Jlystic Shrine. He is a member of the Phi 
Kappa Psi, a literary college fraternity, and 
of the Phi Rho Sigma medical fraternity. By 
reason of his father's military service in the 
Civil War, he is eligible for and holds mem- 
bership in the Military Order of the Loyal Le- 
gion of the United States. 

On the 22nd of March, 1893, was solem- 
nized the marriage of Dr. Eastman to Miss Ota 
Beal Nicholson, who was bom in Crawfords- 
vills, Indiana, and who is a daughter of William 
E. and Jennie (Beal) Nicholson. Her father 
was a representative citizen and substantial 
capitalist of Crawfordsville, where his death 
occurred in 1903 and where his wife still main- 
tains her home. Dr. and Mrs. Eastman have 
one child, — Nicholson Joseph. 

David F. Beery, M. D. This is an age of 
specializing, in other words, of concentration 
of effort, and in view of the wide realm cov- 
ered in sciences of medicine and surgery it may 
well be' understood that in the lifetime of no 
one man is it possible to become familiar in a 



practical and adequate way with the vast fund 
of information and the technical scheme of all 
that is involved in the worl? of the profession. 
Thus there is distinctive propriety in specializ- 
ing in this exacting vocation, for years of study, 
investig:ation and active work along certain 
specified lines may alone place ample demands 
upon the time and attention, as well as the 
mental powers, of the successful practitioner. 
Dr. David F. Berry of this article is numbered 
among the representative physicians and sur- 
geons of Indianapolis, where he makes a spe- 
cialty of the diseases of the ear, nose and 
throat, in the treatment of which he has been 
most successful and gained a high reputation. 

Dr. Berry is a native son of the fine old 
Hoosier state, inasmuch as he was born on a 
farm near the village of Franklin, Johnson 
County, on the 25th of April, 1874. He is 
a son of William H. and Elizabeth J. (King) 
Berry, the former of whom was' bom near 
College Corner, Butler County, Ohio, and the 
latter in Boone County, Indiana, where her 
parents were early settlers. His father was 
one of the honored and influential citizens of 
the community in which he so long lived and 
labored to goodly ends. Practically his en- 
tire active career was one of close identifica- 
tion with the great basic industry of agri- 
culture, in connection with which he gained 
marked success. He was a stanch Republican 
in politics and served in various local offices of 
trust, and both he and his wife held member- 
ship in the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

On the old home farm Dr. Berry was reared 
to maturity and after completing the curric- 
uluni of the public schools of the village of 
Franklin he became a clerk in various drug 
stores in Indianapolis, where he became a skill- 
ful pharmacist. He was employed in this 
capacity for a period of seven years and his 
knowledge of and taste for materia medica 
and therapeutics, gained during his experience 
as a pharmacist, led him to enter the medical 
profession, in which he felt were offered wider 
opportunities for effective service. After pass- 
ing one year in the study of medicine under 
the effective preceptorship of Dr. Thomas E. 
Courtney, of Indianapolis, he entered the Cen- 
tral College of Physicians & Surgeons, in this 
city, in which institution he was graduated as 
a member of the class of 1900 and from which 
he received his degree of Doctor of Medicine. 
In his class he had the distinction of winning 
the highest honors in surgery and thus was 
made the recipient of the John M. Gaston 
gold surgery medallion. He forthwith ini- 
tiated the practice of medicine in Indianap- 
olis, and he is now one of the prominent and 
successful specialists, devoting his attention 



664 



BISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



exclusively to diseases of the ear, nose and 
throat and having control -of a representative 
clientage, also holding a secure place in the 
esteem of his' professional confreres and the 
confidence and regard of the general public. 
He is a member of the Indianapolis Medical 
Society and the Indiana State Medical So- 
ciety, and the American Medical Association. 

In politics Dr. Berry is arrayed as a stal- 
wart supporter of the principles and policies 
for which the Republican party stands spon- 
sor, and he is affiliated with the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows. He is also a member 
of the Marion Club, one of the representative 
civic and social organizations of the capital 
city. He and his wife hold membership in 
the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

Charles F. Remy. The bar of the City 
of Indianapolis has as one of its representa- 
tive members Charles F. Remy, former re- 
porter of the supreme court of the state and 
now senior member of the law firm of Remy 
& Berryhill, whose offices are located in the 
Law building. He is a representative of the 
fourth generation of the Remy family in In- 
diana, with whose annals the name has been 
identified since the territorial epoch of its 
history. 

Charles F. Remy was born on the parental 
farmstead, near the village of Hope, in Haw- 
creek Township, Bartholomew County. Indiana, 
on the 25th of February, 1860, and is a son of 
Calvin J. and Miranda C. (Essex) Remy, the 
former of French and Irish lineage and the 
latter of German. Calvin J. Remy was born 
in Franklin County, Indiana, as was also his 
father, John T. Remy, the year of whose na- 
tivity was 1810; showing that the family was 
founded in that section of the state in the 
early pioneer days, when the district was es- 
sentially an unbroken forest wilderness. John 
T. Remy became one of the successful farmers 
of Bartholomew County, and there his son 
Calvin J. also has gained prestige and defi- 
nite prosperity in connection with the great 
basic industry of agriculture, with which he 
is still actively identified. He is one of the 
honored and influential citizens of his section, 
is a stanch Republican in his political proclivi- 
ties, and both he and his wife hold member- 
ship in the Baptist Church. Mrs. Remy is 
likewise a representative of one of the ster- 
ling pioneer families of the Hoosier state and 
is a native of Bartholomew County. 

The boj'hood and early youth of Charles F. 
Remy were compassed by the beneficent in- 
fluences of the homo farm, in whose work he 
early began to lend his aid, and to the district 
schools is he indebted for his early educational 
discipline. He made excellent progress in the 



accumulation, of scholastic knowledge and 
finally, was matriculated in Franklin College, 
at Franklin, Indiana, in which well ordered 
institution he was graduated as a member of 
the class of 1884, with the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts. Later he entered the law depart- 
ment of the celebrated University of ^lichi- 
gan, at Ann Arbor, where he completed the 
prescribed, technical course and was graduated 
in 1888, with the degree of Bachelor of Laws, 
lie was forthwith admitted to the bar of 
^Michigan and also to that of Indiana, and 
he then located in Columbus, the county seat 
of Bartholomew County, where he entered in- 
to a professional partnership with Judge Mar-- 
shall Hacker, with whom he was. a'ssociatert 
in practice for a period of eigliC years, within 
which he emphatically demonstrated his pow- 
ers as an able and versatile trial lawyer and well 
fortified counsellor. In 1894 he was elected 
to represent Bartholomew County in the lower 
house of the state legislature, serving one term 
and proving a valuable working member of 
the general assembly of 189.5. He was as- 
signed to various committees of importance and 
exercised no little infiuence both on the floor 
of the house and in the committee room. He 
was the house chairman of the Committee on 
Benevolent Institutions, and in that capacity 
assisted in the enactment that year of the law 
]nitting the state's benevolent institutions on 
a non-partisan basis. It was the hard fight of 
that session. 

In 1896 ^Ir. Remy wa> elected reporter of 
the supreme court of tlie state, giving most 
discriminating and able service in this im- 
portant office, to which he was re-elected in 
1900. upon the expiration of his first term. 
He was the first Republican ever elected to a 
state office from Bartholomew County, and he 
continued incumbent. of the same until the ex- 
piration of his second term, in January, 1905. 
He did not become a candidate for re-election. 
Since his retirement from this position Mr. 
Remy has been engaged in active general prac- 
tice of law in Indianapolis, being associated 
with James !M. Berrvhill, under the firm name 
if Remy & Berryhill. with offices at 911-15 
Law building. The firm controls a substan- 
tial and essentially representative business, and 
its members have appeared in connection with 
much important litigation in both the state 
and federal courts, also acting in an advisory 
capacity for a large and important clientage. 

In politics Mr. Remy is arrayed as a stal- 
wart in the camp of the Republican party, 
and he has rendered efficient service in the 
promotion of its cause. He was a leader in 
the party maneuvers in his native county prior 
to his removal to the capital city, and his in- 



HISTOKY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



665 



terest in the cause has not abated in the least, 
though he subordinates all else to the, insistent 
demands of his professional business. In a 
fraternal way Mr. Remy is aflBliated with the 
Knights of Pythias, and both he and his wife 
hold membership in the Baptist Church. 

On the 25th of November, 1891, was solem- 
nized the marriage of Mr. Remy to Miss De- 
borah Henderson, who was a resident of Bar- 
tholomew County, Indiana, and who is a daugh- 
ter of William Hender--^i. a representative 
citizen of Columbus, tha c -r ^-y. Mr. and 
Mrs. Remy have one child, , liiam H., who 
was born on the 18th of December, 1892. 

AViLi.iAM Frederick Elliott, a leading 
member of the Indianapolis bar and a widely 
knowm author of legal works, is junior in the 
lav,- firm of Elliott and Elliott, of which his 
distinguished father is the senior. The latter, 
Hon. Byron K. Elliott, has spent nearly thir- 
tv years of his professional career in the of- 
ficial or judicial sen-ice of his city, county and 
state, tlie last decade of that period being oc- 
cupied as a judge of the state supreme court. 
The unusual and splendid services of this ven- 
erable citizen are portrayed in other pages of 
this publication. William F. is a native of 
Indianapolis, born April 29, 1859, and was 
reared and educated in that city. He received 
a thorough scholastic training, graduating 
from Butler College in 1880 and from the 
law school of the University of Michigan in 
1881. 

Upon obtaining his professional degree, Mr. 
Elliott at once entered practice at Indianapolis, 
and since 1893 has been associated with his 
father under the style of Elliott and Elliott. 
Father and son are also joint authors of sev- 
eral standard text books on law, among which 
might be named as the later and best known 
works, "Elliott on Evidence" and a revised 
edition of "Elliott on Railroads". William F. 
has been a prolific and valued contributor to 
law literature, having written much for both 
encj'clopedias and magazines. Mr. Elliott lec- 
tured at DePauw while they had a law school 
and for about ten years he has and does still 
lecture at the Indiana Law School of Indianap- 
olis. In 1897 he married Miss Effie Mar- 
quardt. of Des Moines, Iowa. In Masonry, 
^Ir. Elliott is of the thirty-second degree and 
in his citizenship and private life does not 
belie the square and benevolent principles of 
his order. In politics he is a Republican. He 
is a member of the Sigma Ki fraternity. 

Will H. Latta. Among the younger lead- 
ers of the Indianapolis bar is Will H. Latta, 
who is a native of the Hoo.sier state born No- 
vember 5. 1868. He is a son of William W. 
and liarriet E. (Jackson) Latta and he spent 



the years of his development into manhood on 
his father's farm. The son obtained a sound 
education, graduating, from DePauw Univer- 
sity in 1890 and pursuing a course of one 
year in the law school of that institution. 

At his graduation in law and admission to 
the bar, in 1891, Mr. Latta located at In- 
dianapolis, where he has since been an active 
practitioner with a growing reputation. In 
1894 he married Miss Carrie Hunt, and both 
he and his \yiie are members of the Meridian 
Street Methodist Episcopal Church, to whose 
social, charitable and religious work they are 
valued contributors. 

DeWitt V. Moore. Among those who are 
lending a due quota of aid in the laudable work 
of building up the greater and larger industrial 
Indianapolis Mr. Moore occupies a position of 
no secondary prominence, as he is identified in 
a capitalistic and executive way with two of 
the important industrial concerns of the 
capital city, and he exemplifies in marked de- 
gree that resourceful initiative power and that 
progressive spirit through which the civic and 
business interests of Indianapolis have been so 
signally furthered in late years. He stands to- 
day as one of the essentially representative 
business men of the younger generation in the 
capital city, and while it is incompatible with 
the province of this publication to enter into 
extended genealogical details, it is most con- 
sistent that a brief review of his career be in 
corporated within its pages. 

DeWitt Van Deusen Moore, civil engineer 
and contractor, was bom in Perry, Lake Coun- 
ty, Ohio, on the 6th of April, 1874, and is the 
only child of Rev. Webster Oliver Moore and 
Anna Electa (Van Deusen) Moore, the for- 
mer of whom was born in Vermont, a scion of 
one of the old and honored families of New 
England, and the latter of whom was bom in 
New York City, of stanch Holland Dutch 
lineage. The father is a prominent member 
of the clergy of the Christian, or Disciples, 
Church, in whose ministry he has long ren- 
dered zealous and effective service. He was 
graduated in the Northwestern Christian Uni- 
versity, now known as Butler College, located 
in Irvington, an attractive suburb of Indian- 
apolis. He is an influential figure in the af- 
fairs of his church and has been for many years 
a valued contributor to its periodical literature 
as well as one of the able exponents of its 
faith. 

Because of the somewhat itinerant nature 
of his fathei-'s vocation, DeWitt V. Moore 
gained his early education in many different 
public schools, in the states of Ohio and New 
York, and his lack of continued attendance in 
any one school and the absence of uniformity 



HISTOEY OF GEEATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



in the grading systems of the various schools, 
made it virtually impossible for him to gi-adu- 
ate, though he, perhaps, covered a wider range 
of study than did those who followed the cur- 
riculum of the public schools of any one place. 
His higher academic discipline was secured in 
the normal school at Wauseon, Ohio, and his- 
toric old Hiram College, at Hiram, that state, 
where he prosecuted his studies for one year. 

After leaving college, having determined to 
prepare himself for the architectural profes- 
sion, Mr. Moore went to the city of Cleveland, 
Ohio, where he passed some time in technical 
study and in working at practical carpentry, 
as a prerequisite of success in his chosen voca- 
tion. After lea^ang Cleveland he passed some 
time in the office of one of the leading archi- 
tects of Toledo, Ohio. The broken and inter- 
mittent character of Mr. Moore's education gave 
him no special standing or prestige from the 
standard of mere diplomas or collegiate de- 
grees, and his education as represented in his 
mastery of his profession must be considered 
more as a personal grasping of those things 
most essential to his chosen profession. His 
knowledge has been gained by a valuable com- 
bination of technical study and practical ex- 
perience, and none can doubt that he has made 
the best of the opportunities presented and 
that he has no reason to regret the lack of the 
mere superficial honor of a degree. The value 
of such an education of hard work is best evi- 
denced by his rapid advancement and by the 
large and important work designed by him and 
constructed under his direction. 

Soon after identifying himself with the prac- 
tical work of the architectural profession Mr. 
Moore became convinced that his maximum 
potentiality lay along constructional rather 
than the artistic and decorative lines of the 
profession, and this decision naturally turned 
him toward the field of civil engineering. 
With this in view he came to Indianapolis in 
the autumn of 1895 and, through the kindly 
consideration of "Uncle Billy" Jackson, the 
ever loyal friend of young men, he entered the 
employ of the Union Railway Company, with 
which he remained for nearly seven years. His 
labors with this corporation were under the 
immediate supervision of the late Martin W. 
Mansfield, assistant chief engineer of the Penn- 
sylvania Railroad. At the time mentioned Mr. 
Mansfield was superintendent of the Pennsyl- 
vania lines in Indianapolis and ilr. iloore 
was soon advanced to the position of assistant 
engineer on the Indianapolis & Vincennes divi- 
sion. During the last iowr years of his railroad 
experience he carried the work of both the In- 
dianapolis and the Vincennes offices, with a large 
number of assistants. His association with Mr. 



Mansfield was of great benefit to him, especial- 
ly in the development of character and broad- 
minded policies. Much systematic training also 
was obtained during this period, through his 
assisting in the preparation of reports and spe- 
cial work. 

In April, 1902, there came to Mr. Moore the 
solution of the problem whether to accept pro- 
motion with the railroad company and enter 
upon the wandering career of a railway civil 
engineer or to leave the service and enter busi- 
ness in an independent way. The choice was 
made for the latter and he entered into part- 
nership with H. A. Mansfield, former city en- 
gineer of Indianapolis, under the firm name 
of the Mansfield Engineering Company. In 
August of the same year the Moore-Mansfield 
Construction Company was organized and in- 
corporated, and the engineering and construc- 
tion business handled by these two companies 
has been of wide scope and importance, espe- 
cially when is taken into consideration the 
youth of the interested principals and of the 
companies themselves. The aim of Messrs. 
Mansfield and Moore has been to establish in 
Indianapolis engineering and contracting con- 
cerns which could be depended upon for high- 
grade engineering service in connection with 
the commercial business of contracting, and 
with the attempt also to place the latter on a 
systematic and substantial basis. The field of 
operations has been varied, and no attempt has 
been made to specialize along any one line. 
r)ridges, railroads, sewers, streets, buildings, 
etc., constructed from the plans of others or 
from their own designs, have demonstrated the 
facilities and powers of the two concerns and 
also the splendid technical and practical equip- 
ment of ^Ir. ]\Ioore and his confrere. 

In February, 1904, Mr. Moore began to give 
special thought and study to the use of con- 
crete and reinforced concrete in connection 
with building construction. At this time there 
was not to be found in Indianapolis a single 
building of any importance that was constructed 
of the reinforced concrete, nor, indeed, was 
there such a building in the entire state. His 
first efforts to influence the utilization of this 
system of construction met with apathy, not to 
say discouragement. However, the knowledge 
of the value of the system and of its effective 
application in other cities was rapidly gaining 
recognition, and ^Mr. ^Moore began the use of 
the reinforced concrete in a small way and 
finally, during the spring and summer of 1906, 
the ^ioore-Mansfield Construction Company had 
the satisfaction of constructing under contract 
the fine Board of Trade building in Indian- 
apolis, an eight-story structiire, all of rein- 
forced concrete. Since the completion of tlie 



HISTOEY OF GEEATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



667 



same many other buildings and a large num- 
ber of bridges have been constructed by the 
company in Indianapolis and in many other 
sections of the state. It is needless to say that 
Mr. Moore deserved great credit for Ms ener- 
gy, prescience and activity exemplified at a 
time when this splendid building material need- 
ed an exponent. His ambitious, hard-working 
disposition is shown by the high standard al- 
ready attained, and as a progressive business 
man and as one whose achievement is worthy 
of note, he may well be classed among the lead- 
ing "captains of industry" in the state of In- 
diana, as is he one of the popular citizens and 
representative business men of its capital city. 

In politics Mr. Moore gives an unqualified 
allegiance to the Republican party, and he has 
taken an active interest in the promotion of the 
cause of the "grand old party." Though not 
actively identified with any religious organi- 
zation he is a believer in the tenets of the 
Christian religion and attends and supports 
the Disciples' or Christian church, in whose 
faith he was reared. He is a member and di- 
rector of the Commercial Club, and is iden-. 
tified with the Board of Trade, the Marion 
Club and the Indiana Engineering Society, be- 
sides which he is a member and director of 
the American Society of Engineering Con- 
tractors, with headquarters in the City of New 
York. He is prominently identified with the 
time-honored Masonic fraternity, in which his 
affiliations are as here noted: Oriental Lodge, 
No. .500, Free & Accepted Masons; Keystone 
Chapter, No. G, Royal Arch Masons; Indian- 
apolis Council, No. 2, Royal and Select Mas- 
ters; Eaper Commandery, No. 1, Knights 
Templar; and Indianapolis Consistory, Ancient 
Accepted Scottish Eite, in which he has at- 
tained to the thirty-second degree, having been 
president of his class of 1905 ; he is also a 
member of Murat Temple, Ancient Arabic Or- 
der of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. 

On the 14th of June, 1898, Mr. Moore was 
united in marriage to Miss Flora Mabel Berg, 
daughter of Samuel and Pauline Isabelle (Gen- 
try) Berg, of Arcadia, Indiana. She died on 
the 2.5th of August, 1899, and is survived by a 
son. Berg DeWitt, who was born August 24, 
1899. On the 19th of November, 1903, Mr. 
^loore wedded Miss Dorothy Comer, daughter 
of the late John C. Comer, whose wife, Anna 
E. (Gilbert) Comer, now resides in Indian- 
apolis. Air. Comer was one of the well known 
and substantial business men of Marion and 
ilorgan Counties and was a leader in the local 
ranks of the Republican party. He was sher- 
iff of ^Morgan County for two terms, and was a 
gallant soldier of the Union in the Civil War. 



Mr. and Mrs. Moore have one son, Gilbert 
Comer Moore, who was born October 1, 1904. 

John C. Euckelshaus is one of the most 
prominent members of the Indianapolis bar, 
both in pirivate practice and as a representa- 
tive of his city and county. He is a native 
of the city, born on the 11th of March, 1873, 
and is a son of Conrad and Caroline (Karle) 
Euckelshaus. His father was born in Germany 
and his mother in Indianapolis, of German 
parents, the former having resided in the state 
capital since he was seventeen years of age; 
as he is now in his sixtieth year, it is evident 
that he is classed as one of the early settlers 
of Indianapolis. Conrad Euckelshaus has been 
retired from an old and prosperous grocery 
business for sixteen years, his son Henry suc- 
ceeding him as its proprietor. His wife is 
also in the full enjoyment of an industrious 
and useful life. 

John C, the elder of two children, first 
obtained a public school education, then en- 
joyed two years at DePauw University, and 
completed his studies by a course at the In- 
diana Law School, from which he graduated 
in 1895. Admitted to practice in that year, 
he has since been a stirring and progressive 
figure in professional practice and public life. 
Soon after commencing practice he was ap- 
pointed county attorney for the poor, became 
deputy prosecuting attorney about a year and 
a half later, and resigned the latter to be- 
come a candidate for the head of the depart- 
ment. He was elected to the office of prosecut- 
ing attorney in 1900 and 1902, serving cred- 
itably for two terms, and in 1905 and 1907 
was chosen chairman of the Marion County 
Eepublican Central Committee. He is now 
serving as county attorney of Marion County, 
his first appointment to that office being in 
January, 1908. Mr. Euckelshaus has a strong 
standing in social and fraternal organizations, 
among others enjoying membership in the Co- 
lumbia and ]\Lnrion Clubs and the Knights of 
Pythias. In 1898 he married Miss Anna C. 
Kiley, daughter of John and Catherine Kaley, 
of Marion, Indiana, and the children by this 
union are John, Conrad and Thomas. 

Joseph E. ^Morrow, M. D., has been a resi- 
dent of Indianapolis since his childhood days, 
and here he has worked his own way forward 
to a position of distinctive prestige as one of 
the representative physicians and surgeons of 
the capital city. As a specialist in the treat- 
ment of genito-urinary diseases he has attained 
high repute, and to this special branch of his 
profession he now gives his undivided atten- 
tion, in both the medical and surgical depart- 
ments. He has been in a significant sense 
the architect of his own fortunes, and thus it 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



is the more gratifying to note his high stand- 
ing in his profession and as a loyal and pub- 
lit-spirited citizen of the communily in which 
practically his entire life thus far has been 
passed. 

Dr. Morrow is a native of the City of Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania, where he was bom on 
the 12th of January, 1853, and he is a son 
of Robert and Sallie (Bender) Morrow, the 
former of whom waS' born in Pennsylvania, a 
member of an early settled family of that 
commonwealth, and the latter of whom was 
a native of France — presumably of Alsace-Lor- 
raine, now constituting a province of Germany. 
Robert Morrow was reared to manhood in the 
old Keystone state, where he received a limited 
common-school education. There his mar- 
riage was solemnized and there he continued 
to reside until 1857,- when he removed with 
his family to Indianapolis, where he followed 
the vocation of stationary engineer for a term 
of years, after which he was identified with 
the'draying and transfer business. He was a 
man of unassuming worth of character and 
well merited the respect in which he was uni- 
formly held in the community which so long 
represented his home. He died in Indianap- 
olis in 1899, when about seventy-eight years 
of age, and his widow still resides here, hav- 
ing attained to the venerable age of eighty- 
two years (1909). They became the parents 
of four children, of whom one son and one 
daughter are now living. The father was a 
Democrat in politics and his wife has long 
been a devoted member of the Baptist Church. 
Dr. Morrow was a child of four years at 
the time of tlie family removal from Phila- 
delphia to Indianapolis, and in the latter city 
he was reared to maturity. He attended the 
public schools until he had attained to the 
age of twelve years, when he found employ- 
ment and became largely dependent upon his 
own resources. His prescience and ambition 
prompted him to seek eventually wider educa- 
tional advantages, and he conserved his earn- 
ings for the purpose of gaining the desired 
end. At the age of nineteen years he entered 
the old Northwestern Christian University, 
now known as Butler College, located at Irv- 
ington, a suburb of Indianapolis, where he 
continued his studies for one and one-half 
years, after which he entered Shurtleff College, 
at Upper Alton, Illinois, where he completed 
the work of the sophomore year. From 187fi 
until 1880 he was identified with business in- 
terests in Indianapolis and he was then mat- 
riculated in the ]Medical College of Indiana, 
in this city, in which institution he completed 
the prescribed course and was graduated as a 
member of the class of 1883, with the well 



e-.irned degree of Doctor of Medicine. He was 
a student of Dr. J. W. Marsee. After his 
graduation Dr. Morrow served as interne in 
the Indianapolis City Hospital until 1885, and 
in this position gained most valuable clinical 
experience. Since that time he has been en- 
gaged in the active practice of his profession 
m Indianapolis and, in view of his recognized 
professional ability and the determination, per- 
severance and self-reliance that have ever char- 
acterized him, it is needless to say that he 
has gained determinate success and precedence 
and has built up a practice of representative 
order. He continued in general practice un- 
til 1900, since which time he has limited his 
practice to the treatment of genito-urinary 
diseases, realizing that through such concentra- 
tion in the domain of his profession he can 
make his .services more valuable and find am- 
ple .scope for his best efforts. 

Dr. Morrow has done a large amount of ef- 
fective post-graduate work and prosecuted 
nmch individual research and study, particu- 
larly along the line of his special department 
of practice. In 1899 he completed a course 
in the Post-Graduate School & Hospital in 
New York City and in the New York School 
of Clinical Medicine. In 1901 he did post- 
graduate work in the Chicago Polyclinic, one 
of the fine institutions of that western me- 
tropolis. The doctor is attending physician 
in the treatment of genito-urinary diseases 
at the Indianapolis City Hospital and also the 
city dispensary, and in tliis same specialty he 
was formerly an adjunct-professor of the Cen- 
tral College of Physicians & Surgeons. He is 
an appreciative and valued member of the In- 
diana State Medical Society and the Indianap- 
olis ^ledical Society. He enjoys marked per- 
sonal popularity in his home city and is a 
member of the Columbia Club, "the Marion 
Club and other representative civic organiza- 
tions. In a fraternal way he is affiliated with 
the Knights of Pythias. His political alle- 
giance is accorded to the Republican party, in 
whose cause he manifests a lively interest, and 
both he and his wife hold membership in the 
Baptist Church. 

On the 31st of March, 1886, was solemnized 
the marriage of Dr. Morrow to Miss Eliza- 
lieth M. Richards, who was bom and reared 
in Onondflgo County, New York, and who is 
a daughter of Elisha and Lydia A. Richards. 
Dr. and Mrs. Morrow have one son, Robert E., 
who was born on the 6th of July, 1887. 

NiCHOL.\s McCarty, Sr. Not too often and 
not through the agency of too many vehicles 
can be recorded the life history of one who 
lived so honorable and useful a life as did 
Nicholas McCartv, Sr., who was an honored 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



66» 



and distinguished pioneer of Indiana and of 
its capital city. He was a man of signal ex- 
altation and purity of purpose, of well dis- 
ciplined mind, though his early educational 
advantages were limited, and his course was, 
guided and governed by the most inviolable 
principles of integrity and honor. Simple and 
unostentatious in his self-respecting and tol- 
erant individuality, endowed with strong char- 
acter and generous and lovable qualities, he 
could not prove other than a dynamic force 
for good in whatsoever relations in life he 
might have been placed. As a business man 
he was prominent and successful; in public 
affairs he wielded 'much influence; and in so- 
cial life his personality gained and retained 
to him unqualified confidence and esteem. In- 
diana was fortunate in enlisting him as one 
of her pioneers, and his name is indelibly writ- 
ten upon her annals, though more than half a 
century has passed since he was . summoned 
from the scenes of his mortal endeavors. 

Mr. McCarty was born on the 26th of Sep- 
tember, 1795, at Moorefield, Hardy County, 
Virginia, which section is now included in the 
State of West Virginia, and when he was a 
child his father died, after which his mother 
removed to Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. He re- 
ceived but meager educational privileges, as 
the financial status of the family was such 
that he was thrown largely upon his own re- 
sources when a mere boy. He ever reverted 
with satisfaction that he was enabled at an 
early age not only to support himself but to 
care for his loved and devoted mother, to 
whom he ever accorded the utmost filial so- 
licitude. In his boyhood days he worked on 
a farm in Ohio from there going to Pittsburg. 
Before he had attained the age of twenty years 
he went from Pittsburg to Newark, Ohio, 
where he entered the employ of Mr. Bucking- 
ham, who was then one of the leading mer- 
chants of the Buckeve state and in whose serv- 
ice the young Virginian continued for several 
years, within which he manifested the fidelity 
and business perspicacity that characterized 
his entire career, with the result that his em- 
ployer soon placed him in charge of a branch 
store near Newark, Ohio. He ever commanded 
the unqualified confidence and esteem of Mr. 
Buckingham, and their friendship continued 
inviolate until the death of the latter. 
Through industry and frugality Mr. McCarty 
accumulated within a few years sufficient cap- 
ital to justify him in beginning an independ- 
ent business, though necessarily on a modest 
scale. He was led to investigate the advan- 
tages and resources of Indiana, and upon com- 
ing to the little village of Indianapolis, in 
the autumn of 1823, he became so favorably 



impressed with the embryonic capital city that 
he here took up his residence. Thereafter In- 
dianapolis represented his home and the cen- 
ter of his interests until the close of his long 
and signally useful life. He was a young man 
of twenty-eight years at the time of his ar- 
rival in the capital town, and soon afterward 
he here engaged in the general merchandise 
business, by establishing himself in a modest 
store at the southwest corner of Washington 
and Pennsylvania streets — a location popu- 
larly designated as McCarty's Corner for a 
period of more than thirty years thereafter. 
He was the first merchant to here open a 
store of any considerable importance, and his 
establishment thus attracted a large patron- 
age, according to the conditions then obtain- 
ing, so that his success was of pronounced 
order from the initiation of his venture. Con- 
cerning his business career we can not do bet- 
ter than to quote, with slight paraphrase, 
from a previously published sketch of his life 
appearing in the Commemorative Biographical 
Record of Indianapolis and Vicinity. 

"With a degree of confidence little under- 
stood in his day, he soon branched out ex- 
tensively by establishing stores at various 
points in the state, including Laporte, Green- 
field, Covington, Cumberland and Waverly. 
To conduct these branches profitably without 
neglecting his central establishment he em- 
ployed many young men, in whom he took a 
great interest and several of whom attained 
success in later life. He aimed not only to 
give them adequate commercial experience but 
also endeavored to instill into them those ster- 
ling principles which made him so respected 
as a man, aside from any reputation he may 
have won in business life. Mr. McCarty was 
one of the greatest merchants of his time cen- 
tral Indiana had ever known. He continued 
to conduct his original establishment in In- 
dianapolis for many years and to the south of 
his store he erected a substantial brick resi- 
dence, which was the home of his family. On 
the property which he thus owned is now lo- 
cated the handsome Century building. Mr. 
McCarty's enterprise and progressive methods 
were proverbial in the early days, and the 
stories of his original and ingenious expedi- 
ents for overcoming the obstacles that blocked 
the path of the pioneer merchant warrant the 
belief that he would have been a leading spirit 
in any day or under any conditions. But 
though he maintained his aggressive energy to 
the last, Mr. McCarty never lowered the high 
standard of honor with which he set out in 
life. He never promoted his own interests at 
the expense of those of another — a character- 
istic so generally recognized . by all who knew 



HISTOEY OF GKEATEK INDIANAPOLIS. 



him that, in spite of the fact that he was not- 
ably successful, he never excited any but the 
friendliest feelings among his associates. He 
shared his prosperity with the communities in 
which it was won and was ever a generous and 
public-spirited citizen. But even better than 
his public benefactions were the various en- 
tei-prises he set on foot and which gave profit- 
able employment to many, besides advancing 
the welfare of the localities in which they were 
carried on. One of the early industries in 
Indiana which for many years was a source 
of revenue that added substantially to the in- 
comes of the pioneer residents was the col- 
lection of ginseng and its preparation for 
shipment. As early as 1821, following the 
advice of Philadelphia friends, James Blake 
came to Indianapolis to investigate the possi- 
bilities of this business. At that time ginseng 
grew abundantly in the woods all about the 
settlement, and as the demand from China was 
on the increase he arranged to ship the product 
from Philadelphia. In a little house south of 
the creek known as Pogue's Eun, on the site 
of the present depot of the Big Four Eailroad, 
he installed a drying and purifying apparatus, 
where Mr. McCarty collected the roots sent in 
by the farmers to his place at Indianapolis 
and his various branch stores. This business, 
of great benefit to the farmers, was one adjunct 
to Mr. McCarty's merchandising, barter be- 
ing common in the early days. Another ven- 
ture somewhat out of the ordinary was his 
contracting to supply the Indians, and in the 
course of this business he became quite famil- 
iar with the dialects of two or three of the 
tribes on the Miami reservation". 

Ever alert, progressive and legitimately am- 
bitious not only for personal success but for 
the advancement of the general welfare of his 
liome town and state, Mr. McCarty's powers 
of initiative and effective leadership came into 
play along many important lines aside from 
the business operations already noted. Thus 
we find him actively interesting himself in 
the attempt to introduce the growing of silk 
in Indiana, about the year 1835. About five 
years later he initiated one of the most im- 
portant enterprises incidental to his business 
career, by his efforts in promoting the cultiva- 
tion and manufacture of hemp, to the raising 
of which product he devoted much of his 
baj-ou farm near Indianapolis, as well as land 
in other sections of the state. A considerable 
portion of this farm is now within the city 
limits of Indianapolis and is occupied by a 
number of the city's important industrial 
plants. Owing to the financial condition of 
the country at the time, the manufacturing of 
hemp proved unprofitable to Mr. McCarty, and 



he abandoned the same after a period of about 
thiee years. He was associated with two 
others in the erection of the first steam flour 
mill in the vicinity of Indianapolis, the same 
having been locatetd on the north side of 
Washington street, at the end of the National 
l)ridge. No citizen had more confidence in 
the ultimate upbuilding of a populous and 
prosperous city as the capital of the state than 
did Mr. McCarty, and in the early days none 
did more to lay substantial foundations for the 
same. He purchased in the early days large 
tracts of land in Marion and other counties of 
the state, and through the great appreciation 
in the value of his holdings in the vicinity of 
Indianapolis his descendants have received 
large financial returns. 

Thus far reference has been made specific- 
ally to only the business career of the hon- 
ored subject of this memoir, but it may well 
be understood that his labors and efforts would 
transcend this field of endeavor and touch 
more closely the civic and political affairs of 
his state. He was well qualified for public 
service and none had a more deep apprecia- 
tion of the duties and responsibilities of citi- 
zenship. He was not a seeker of public office 
but he had that peculiar aptitude for political 
manceuvering and direction that would have 
brought him into much prominence had he 
cared to enter the domain of practical poli- 
tics in a more determinate way. He was a 
zealous advocate of the principles of the Whig 
party and was influential in its affairs and 
councils during the period of its gradual 
decadence, culminating in the organization of 
the Eepublican party, within but a short time 
after his death. He served as commissioner 
of the canal fund and in this capacity he 
effected the first loan made to the State of 
Indiana, his handling of the important inter- 
ests involved having been so able and success- 
ful as to gain to hini a still stronger hold upon 
popular confidence and esteem. He eventually 
resigned this office, prompted by civic honor 
and by the belief that wrong policies were 
being pursued in the connection. From an 
extended editorial appearing in the Indiana 
Democrat of June 13, 1840, are taken the 
following brief statements apropos of his ac- 
tion at this time: "We are not so blinded by 
party as to be unwilling to award justice to 
real merit, let it be found in what ranks it 
may. It is a fact highly creditable to Indiana 
that the early negotiations of loans by our 
fund commissioners were eminently successful. 
Previous to the passage of the internal im- 
provement bill of 1836 Nicholas McCarty. 
the leading merchant of this place, and we 
believe of the state, stood at the head of that 



HISTORY OP GEEATEK INDIANAPOLIS. 



671 



commission. * * * When the internal- 
improvement bill of 1836 was becoming a law 
Mr. McCarty, as a fund commissioner, plainly 
told the members of the legislature that it 
would be a ruinous policy for the state not to 
provide means at that time to pay interest on 
the loans to be effected — that if they did not 
our bonds would soon depreciate. But the 
Whig members, such as Stapp, Evans and 
others, would hear no arguments and passed 
Mr. JlcCart}''s suggestions by as the idle wind, 
regarding them as a clog to the bill. * * * 
The result was that Nicholas McCarty soon 
afterward resigned the station of fund com- 
missioner. He was unwilling further to risk 
his high character as a financier in the ruinous 
policy the state was about pursuing. * * * 
Few men in the state have more foresight 
than he. As an instance we refer to a re- 
markable fact. Kno^\'ing, as well he did, the 
embarrassment this state was running into, he 
resigned his office as fund commissioner long 
before the pressure commenced. Possessed of 
that keen foresight which every real merchant 
should have, he would not jeopard his char- 
acter as a merchant to continue connected as 
an officer .with a ruinous system of internal 
improvement. His proverbial discretion in 
business and his foresight in financial opera- 
tions entitle his opinion to much weight". In 
the same editorial Mr. McCarty is referred 
to as the "Hoosier Girard", a complimentary 
comparison with the notable Pennsylvanian, 
Stephen Girard, and the comment is also made 
that he was giving his support to judge Big- 
ger for governor, because the latter, in the 
state legislature, opposed the State Bank of 
Indiana as inimical to the necessity for a 
United States bank so far as Indiana was 
concerned. 

Subsequent to the year 1843 the Whig party 
had been held popularly culpable for the de- 
pressed financial condition of the country and 
in Indiana it was much in the minority. Un- 
der these conditions the local representatives 
of the party naturally sought for a strong 
popular candidate for Congress — a man whose 
personal popularity could possibly overcome 
prejudice against the party. Under such un- 
favorable conditions, Mr. McCarty became the 
Whig candidate for Congress in his district in 
1847, and though defeated by a small major- 
ity he showed distinctive strength above the 
party ticket in general in the district and state, 
when the star of the Democratic party was at 
the time much in the ascendancy. Jlr. Mc- 
CartVs opponent was Judge Wick, a practical 
politician, and relative to the candidacy of 
Mr. McCarty and the campaign, the following 
words have been previously published : "ilr. 



McCarty made no show of oratory and knew 
none of the wiles of the politician, but he had 
executive ability, strong common sense and a 
clear understanding of the needs of the situa- 
tion. His addresses were exceedingly effective 
and did him great credit as against an oppo- 
nent who was trained to the conduct of cam- 
paigns and accustomed to public duties. A 
few years afterward Mr. McCarty was a candi- 
date for the state Senate and was elected, serv- 
ing three years — the last three years of state 
government imder the old constitution. He 
was made chairman of the committee on cor- 
porations, and as such jealously guarded the 
interests of the people". 

In its somewhat pathetic decline the leaders 
of the Whig party in Indiana sought in the 
campaign of 1852 its most eligible candidate 
for governor — one whose popular strength 
could not be gainsaid" or whose reputation 
be legitimately assailed in the least particular. 
The prominence, activity and high personal 
character of Nicholas McCarty, the self-made 
man, the loyal citizen, marked him as the one 
best adapted to upholding the waning fortunes 
of the party as standard-bearer for the first 
gubernatorial term under the new constitution. 
Naught of lethargy or indirectness of purpose 
ever characterized Mr. McCarty in any of the 
relations of life, and after his nomination for 
governor at the Whig state convention of 
1852, in face of his own strenuous opposition, 
he entered valiantly and ably into the contest. 
So determined was his opposition to becoming 
a candidate for the office that he successfully 
resisted the importunities of the committee 
chosen to solicit his acceptance of the nomina- 
tion tmtil George G. Dunn, one of the most 
gifted men known in the annals of the Hoosier 
commonwealth, arose and demanded, in the 
name of the Whigs of Indiana, that Mr. Mc- 
Carty subordinate his personal interests and 
wishes and come to the rescue of the party 
cause. Mr. McCarty felt that he could not 
consistently make further resistance to the 
demands of his party, and he reluctantly en- 
tered the race, having been nominated by 
acclamation. 

The history of Indiana records the cam- 
paign of 1852 as one in which Mr. McCarty 
made a most gallant and resourceful effort to 
maintain the prestige of the cause in which 
he was enlisted, and though he was defeated 
by Governor Wright, who, as has been said, 
"was an educated man, one of the best 'stump- 
ers' in the United States, and a man whose 
long familiarity with public life had made him 
a master of campaign tactics and a ready 
speaker who could command attention wherever 
he went". It is pleasing to record that Mr. 



HISTORY OF GREATER IXDIAXAPOLIS. 



McCartv and Governor Wright maintained 
the most amicable relations throughout the 
spirited campaign in which they were enlisted 
as antagonists. They often journeyed from 
place to place in company and a mutual feeling 
of confidence and respect caused them iavari-' 
ably to be courteous in personal intercourse 
and in partisan polemics. Apropos of their 
campaign the following pertinent statements 
are worthy of further perpetuation: "Gn the 
stump there was a great difference between 
them. The governor was a good talker and a 
good reasoner: Mr. McCarty was also a good 
talker but not so cogent in argument. He 
dealt in repartee and anecdotes and was par- 
ticularly happy in the application of the lat- 
ter. But the year 1852 was a bad one for 
Whig candidates, and 3Ir. McCarty was de- 
feated by the Democratic nominee". Having 
resigned his seat in the state Senate when he 
accepted the gubernatorial candidacy, he re- 
tired from public life after this memorable 
campaign and never again became a candidate 
for political office, though he continued to 
maintain a lively interest in all that touched 
the welfare of the state and nation. 

Drawing still farther from the admirable 
sketch of the life of Mr. McCarty to which 
recourse has already been had, the following 
record is weU entitled to a place in this pub- 
lication : 

"Practical and great-souled, the interests of 
the conununity were his, and while he was am- 
bitious to acquire influence and independenc-e 
he was wise, broad and humane enough to de- 
sire the success of all good people. By force 
of early circumstances he had but little oppor- 
tunity for learning, but he made the best use 
of what he acquired. He had a ready and 
comprehensive vocabulan- and a simplicit)' of 
statement characteristic of great men in the 
various business and professional walks of life. 
Realizing his own deficiencies as a scholar, he 
did what he could in private life and public 
station to secure to others what he had been 
denied himself. When Mr. McCarty was nom- 
inated for governor, so well was his reputation 
for franknes.s established that the Indianapolis 
Sentinel had this to say of him: 'Like Henr\- 
Clay, everybody who knows Xicholas McCarty 
know? his politics — the same yesterday, today 
and forever^." 

A few years afterwards, while a candidate 
for thp Senate, he was asked in the course of 
the campaign, in two places outside the citv, 
if he favored taxing the schools. In his sneech 
in the Senate he said that he had lacked op- 
portunitv for education when he was a bov 
and would never allow children to be deprived 
of the advantages he had missed, by favoring 



a tax levied on schools. He had had but six 
months" schooling as a boy, so that all his 
splendid foresight and knowledge were gained 
by his own effort and through contact, and his 
career as a statesman show^ how well he suc- 
ceeded in his personal education. - Though a 
hard political worker he was never known to 
seek office, even- office which he held having 
sought him. In the Senate he was chairman 
of the committee on appropriations. 

Mr. McCarty had the deepest reverence for 
the spiritual verities of the Christian faith, 
and he loved his fellow-men, in his interc-ourse 
with whom he was ever kindly, sj-mpathetic 
and tolerant, though a natural hater of all 
meanness and deception. His life was one of 
signal purit}- and honor, and no citizen of 
Indianapolis or of the state has ever held or 
more fully merited the high esteem of the 
people and the affectionate reeard of those 
who came within the sphere of his influenc-e. 
Hi? generosity was such as might have been 
expected of so noble a character, and he was 
ever ready to extend his aid and co-operation 
in the promotion of benevolent and charitable 
objects, in which connection it should be noted 
that he was one of those most prominently 
concerned in the establishing of the Indiana 
Orphans' Home. He "remembered those who 
were forgotten", and his private charities and 
tangible aid to those in affliction or distress 
were known only to himself and the recipients. 

At the time of his death a meeting of the 
citizens of Indianapoli? appointed a committee 
to draft appropriate resolutions, and from the 
same the following appreciative statements 
are taken: 

■'Resolved, That in the departure of our 
fellow-citizen. Nicholas McCarty, Esq., we 
realize the loss of one who since the early days 
of the city has deservedly ranked as a most 
worthy, generous and valuable man, and who 
by his affectionate heart, clearness of mind 
and strict integrity of purpose has warmly en- 
deared himself to all who knew him. In the 
important public trusts committed to him — as 
commissioner of the canal fund, effecting tbe 
first loan of the state, as senator of this county 
and in other engagements — he manifested re- 
markable judiciousness and ability. It was 
with reluctance he was drawn into the pursuit 
of official station, and with decided preference 
he enjoyed the happiness of an attached circle 
of familv and friends. His hand and heart 
were ever at command for the need of the 
afflicted, and his counsel and sympathies were 
extended where they could be useful, with 
imaffected simplicity and modestr'. 

When the shadowy veil was lifted and the 
mortal put on immortality in the death of 



HISTOEY OF GEEATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



673 



Nicholas McCarty, on the 17th of May, 1854, 
there came to those most deeply bereaved a 
measure of consolation and reconciliation in 
having, thus touched so noble, tender and true 
a life — a life unconsciously consecrated to all 
that is best and most ennobling in the schem^ 
of human existence. In conclusion of this 
memoir is given brief record concerning the 
domestic life and relations of its honored sub- 
ject. 

On the 27th ■of July, 1838, in Boone County, 
Kentucky, was solemnized the marriage of 
Nicholas McCarty to Miss Margaret Hawkins, 
daughter of Rev. Jameson Hawkins, one of 
the earliest clergymen of the Baptist Church 
in that section and several times a member of 
the legislature of Kentucky. Mr. and Mrs. 
McCarty became the parents of four children 
— Susanna, Margaret E., Nicholas, Jr., and 
Frances J. Mrs. McCarty, a woman of gentle 
and gracious character, survived her honored 
husband by nearly twenty years, having been 
summoned to eternal rest on the 18th of Feb- 
ruary, 1873. Concerning the children the fol- 
lowing data are entered: 

Susanna McCarrty became the wife of Rev. 
Henry Day, for many years pastor of the 
First Baptist Church of Indianapolis, and she 
died August 30, 1873. Mr. Day died August 
1, 1897, and they are survived by two chil- 
dren — Henry McCarty Day and Margaret Mc- 
Carty Day, of Indianapolis. 

^largaret K. McCarty now maintains 
her home in Indianapolis, although a great 
portion of her time is spent in Los Angeles, 
where she has property. She married John C. 
S. Harrison, grandson of General William 
Henry Harrison and for many years engaged 
in the banking business in Indianapolis. Mr. 
Harrison died in Los Angeles, California, 
April 6, 1904, and he is survived by two of 
his four children — Nicholas McCarty Harri- 
son, of Indianapolis, and Cleves Harrison, of 
Los Angeles, California. 

Nicholas McCarty, Jr., and his sister. Miss 
France? J. McCarty, the youngest of the chil- 
dren, still maintain their home in Indianapolis, 
where all of the children were bom and reared 
and where the family has ever maintadned a 
high social position, well maintaining the 
honors of the name. 

Aonisox H. NoKDYKE. The throbbing pul- 
sations of the manufacturing industries of In- 
diana])olis are felt in all sections of the civil- 
ized world and the products of her magnificent 
institutions have carried her fame far and 
wide. In insuring this prominence and dis- 
tinctive prestige few concerns have contributed 
more conspicuously and worthily than that of 
tlie Xordyke & llarmon Company, whose en- 



terprise is conceded to be one of the most im- 
portant of the kind in the middle west. The 
nistory of this company, of which Addison H. 
Nordyke was president and of which he was 
the virtual founder, is one of significance and 
interest, involving, as it does, the building up 
of a splendid industry from a nucleus of mod- 
est order, and bearing evidence of the well di- 
rected energies of men of courage, progressive 
ideas and marked administrative ability. The 
business has been established in Indiana's cap- 
ital city for more than thirty years and has rep- 
resented one of the forces that have brought 
about the magnificent industrial and commer- 
cial advancement of Indianapolis. Mr. Nor- 
dyke has long been known as one of the rep- 
resentative business men and influential citi- 
zens of Indianapolis, and none holds a more in- 
violable place in popular confidence and esteem. 
Though his service with the great concern with 
which he is identified is now largely one of ad- 
visory order, as he has relegated the practical 
details to the supervision of others, he is still 
alert in connection with the business life of the 
Indiana metropolis and continues to exemplify 
the fact that in his entire career there has been 
no element of futility or indirection of pur- 
pose. The Nordyke & Marmon Company for 
many years gave production to milling machin- 
ery alone, but it now manufactures also the 
Marmon automobiles, which have gained an 
established place among those conceded to be 
of the highest type. 

It is pleasing to record that Addison Haynes 
Nordyke is able to claim Indiana as the place 
of his nativity, and he has never lacked in ap- 
preciation of the fine old Hoosier common- 
wealth. He was born in Richmond, Wayne 
County, Indiana, which was then a small vil- 
lage, on the 5th of May, 1838, and is a son 
of Ellis and Catherine (Haynes) Nordyke, both 
of whom were born in the State of Ohio. They 
became the parents of five children, of whom 
two are still living. 

The lineage of the Nordyke family is traced 
back to stanch Holland Dutch origin, and the 
family was one of prominence in the Nether- 
landsj whence came the original progenitors 
of the American line. So far as authentic 
data indicate, the founders of the family in 
the new world were two brothers. These two 
brothers are descendants of Peter the Great by 
marriage. In Holland it was customary to 
refer to people as the South Dykes or the North 
Dykes, according to the part of the country in 
which they resided. By these appellatibns' they 
were known to each other except in the case 
of relatives or intimate friends. It was an 
easy matter in the Dutch tongue to drop the 
"th" in north and south and those of the north 



674 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



buoame knowu as Xordjkes and those of the 
south as Soudykes. One of the Xordykes, a 
widow, married Peter the Great. A son was 
born to them, who for some reason retained the 
name Nordyke. This son married and two of 
his sons emigrated from Holland and were 
the founders of the Xordyke family in America. 
One of these sons, Stephen Henry Xordyke, in 
company with three sons settled in Philadel- 
phia in' the colonial epoch of our national his- 
tory. From Pennsylvania representatives of 
the family eventually penetrated into the wilds 
of the far west, as Indiana and other of the_ 
central states were then considered, being on' 
the frontier of civilization, and with this and 
other states the family name has been worthily 
identified, in the promotion of material de- 
velopment and civic progress. The parents of 
Addison H. of this review passed the closing 
years of their lives in Richmond, where the 
father died at the age of sixty-seven years and 
the mother at the age of eighty-four. The 
father was a devoted member of the Friends 
church and the mother of the Methodist. In 
his political proclivities the father was a Whig 
and later a Republican. He was a man of 
sterling integi'ity of character and strong men- 
tality, making his life count for good in all its 
relations. He long followed the trade of mill- 
wright and through his earnest and well di- 
rected efforts gained a fair measure of temporal 
success. 

Addison H. Nordyke was reared to maturity 
in his native town of Richmond, and there re- 
ceived the advantages of the common schools — 
a discipline which he has since most effectively 
supplemented by personal reading and study 
and by long and intimate association with 
men and affairs. Wliile a youth he began a 
practical apprenticeshi]) at the trade of mill- 
wright, under the direction of his honored 
father, with whom he also learned most ef- 
fectively the milling business as conducted 
at that period. For some time he was asso- 
ciated with his father in the operation of a 
grist mill at Chenoa. Illinois, and in connec- 
tion with the erection of this mill he gained 
his initial experience in the building and 
equipping of mills, — a line of enterprise in 
which he was destined ultimately to attain 
great success and precedence. For a number 
of vears he was associated with his father in 
the erection of mills throughout Indiana and 
neighboring states, and tlie l>usiness thus es- 
tablished was virtually the nucleus around 
which has been built up the large and im- 
portant industrial enterprise now conducted liy 
the Xordyke & ;\rarniou Company. The orig- 
inal business was conducted under the firm 
name of E. & A. H. Xordyke, and the head- 



quarters of the same were in Richmond, In- 
diana, where the original manufactory was es- 
tablished. In 1866 Daniel W. Marmon pur- 
chased an interest in the business, whereupon 
the firm name of Xordyke & Marmon was 
adopted. The firm built up a large and sub- 
stantial business in the erection and equipping 
of mills, and the splendid development of the 
enterprise eventually rendered it expedient to 
incorporate the same under the laws of the 
state, which action was taken in 1871. In 
1876, to facilitate the business still further, 
the same Avas removed from Richmond to In- 
dianapolis, where were afforded superior trans- 
portation and commercial advantages, under 
the influence of which the industry rapidly 
assumed greater and greater precedence, until 
it has become one of the most important of 
its kind in the country. At the time of the 
removal to Indianapolis the present corporate 
title of the Xordyke & Marmon Company was 
adopted, and the operations of the concern 
are based on a capital stock of one hundred 
thousand dollars. The plant of the company 
is located at the corner of Morris street and 
Kentucky avenue, where large and substantial 
buildings are utilized. The grounds occupy 
thirteen acres, mostly covered with buildings 
equipped witli the highest type of mechanical 
appliances required in the production of mill- 
ing niachinery. The institution has gained 
a high reputation for the superiority of its 
products, and many of the best mills in the 
middle west and elsewhere have been equipped 
by this concern. ^Mr. Xordyke was president 
of the company from the time of its incor- 
poration until lOO'^', and Mr. ^Marmon con- 
tinued to be identified with the business un- 
til his death. Since 1909 the company has 
given much attention to the manufacturing of 
the ".AEarmon" automobiles, and the same have 
met with the favorable reception which their 
merit* justifv. Since his retirement from the 
presidency of the Xordyke & Marmon Com- 
pany Mr. Xordyke has devoted his attention 
largely to the handling of high-grade securi- 
ties, in which line of operations he maintains 
his offices in the Union Trust building.' His 
life has been one of signal honor and integ- 
ritv of ]mriiose, and his ability and powers 
were most fraitful in the upbuilding of the 
fine industry which perpetuates his name. He 
has stood exjionent of loyal and public-spirited 
citizenship, and is today one of the honored 
and well known citizens of Indianapolis. His 
political support is given to the Republican 
party, he is identified with various fraternal 
and civic organizations, and he and his wife 
hold membership in the Tabernacle cliurch, of 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



675 



which Mr. Nordyke has been a trustee twelve 
years. 

On the 34th of May, 1866, was solemnized 
the marriage of Mr. Nordyke to Miss Jennie 
E. Price, born in Baltimore, Maryland, but, 
reared in Richmond, Indiana, being a daugh- 
ter of Charles T. Price, who was a represen- 
tative business man of Richmond. Mrs. Nor- 
dyke was summoned to the life eternal on the 
19th of July, ]881, and is survived by two 
sons, — Charles E., who was born March 28, 
1867, and Walter A. who was born December 
30, 1869. The sons are now actively identi- 
fied with their father in his present business. 
On the 12th of October, 1882, Mr. Nordyke 
was united in marriage to Miss Caroline M. 
Williams, daughter of Caleb Williams, of 
Niles, Michigan, in which place she was born 
and reared. Three sons have been bom of 
this union and their names, with respective 
dates of birth, are here noted: Addison H., 
November 17, 1883 ; Horace W., September 
21, 1886, and Robert S., September 2, 1892. 
Addison H. died in Indianapolis September 
29, 1905. Horace W. was graduated in An- 
napolis Naval Academy in June, 1909. Rob- 
ert S. is a student in Shortridge. 

Hox. Caleb S. Denny. The fact that Hon. 
Caleb S. Denny, of Indianapolis, has served 
for three times as mayor on the Law and Or- 
der platform is an index of one of the strong- 
est personal traits of character. Throughout 
his entire and long career as an active lawyer 
and public man, he has been one of the most 
stalwart advocates of law and order in the city 
and state. He is a native of Indiana, born in 
Monroe Countv, May 13, 1850, a son of James 
H. and Harriet R. (Littrell) Denny. There 
were eleven children in the family, of whom 
Caleb S. M-as the youngest. The original 
American ancestors were Virginians, some of 
whom participated in the Revolutionary War 
and nearly all of whom, strange to say, were 
opposed to slavery. James H. Denny, the 
father, was so opposed to slavery that he de- 
cided to make his home across the Ohio in 
Indiana. He first located in what is now 
^fonroe Countv, and finally settled in Warrick 
T'ountv. The" father of Caleb S. was born 
near Harrodsburg, Kentucky, where the grand- 
father was engaged in the general survey serv- 
ice and in 1850' James H., father of Caleb S. 
Denny, came to Indiana and located in Mon- 
roe County and with the family, three years 
later settled on a farm near Booneville, in 
Warwick Countv. Here his death occurred in 
1861, just after the outbreak of the Civil 
War. One of his sons had already enlisted 
with the Fnion army, and most of the others 
followed him in the ranks in 1863, leaving 
Vol. TI— 3 



only Caleb S. at home to care for his widowed 
mother and the farm. In 1864, the farm was 
rented and the mother and her son located in 
Booneville, there awaiting the outcome of the 
war. At that time no school was in session, 
and Caleb was therefore apprenticed to the 
tinner's trade. His education at that time be- 
ing limited to a few winter terms of a few 
weeks each, his instruction being confined to 
simply reading, writing and arithmetic. After 
spending one year at his trade, he secured his 
mother's consent and entered the school which 
had then been organized at Boonville, in order 
to prepare for college. Finally in the fall of 
1866, he entered the freshman class at As- 
bury, now DePauw, University, at Greencastle, 
Indiana, but after a course of two years was 
again taken out of school on account of a lack 
of funds. By no means discouraged, the 
young man immediaately commenced to teach 
school with the object of earning sufficient 
money to enable him to return to college; but 
while teaching he was tendered the position of 
assistant state librarian, which he accepted in 
1870. This necessitated his removal to In- 
dianapolis, which city has since been his place 
of residence. 

While teaching school, Mr. Denny began 
the study of law under Judge John B. Handy 
of Boonville, continuing his professional stud- 
ies while acting as assistant librarian. In 1871 
he entered the law office of Judge Solomon 
Blair, later studied with Test, Coburn and 
Burns, and in 1872 was admitted to practice 
in the county courts, and in the following 
year he became qualified to appear in the Su- 
preme and Federal courts. In the last named 
year he was also appointed assistant attorney- 
general of Indiana, and after serving as such 
for two years entered the general practice of 
law, forming a partnership with Judge James 
C. Denny, then attorney-general, which rela- 
tion continued for a period of two years. He 
then formed a partnership with Judge David 
V. Bums, which continued for a period of 
three years. In the fall of 1881, Mr. Denny 
was elected city attorney of Indianapolis, be- 
ing re-elected in 1884 and served only one 
year of his second term. The cause of his 
resignation was his election as mayor of In- 
dianapolis, the duties of which he assumed 
January 1, 1886. The issues of the campaign 
centered in the fight of the "Law and Order" 
party against the so-called "liberal policy", 
which Mr. Denny asserted was one of license 
rather than of liberality. The fight was bitter, 
but the Republicans triumphed decisively. 
.\fter serving one year Mr. Denny was recom- 
inarted by his party, and again elected, and 
retired from office with the confidence and 



676 



HISTOltY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



admiration of the public at large. Mr. Denny 
then resumed private practice of his profes- 
sion, but in 1893 was prevailed upon to again 
become his party's candidate for mayor. He 
had been succeeded in that office by Hon. 
Thomas L. Sullivan, an able Democrat who 
had been twice elected by increased majorities, 
but ilr. Denny assumed the mayoralty for the 
third time by a majority of nearly thirty-two 
hundred, to the unfeigned surprise of both 
parties, all of which points to the fact of his . 
siibstantial popularity. Since completing his 
third term in the mayor's chair, he has con- 
tinued to practice law with credit and success. 
Since returning to active practice Mr. Denny 
has also served three times as county attor- 
ney. In 1908 he was presidential elector for 
the Seventh Congressional district. He is an 
active and strong figure in the fraternities of 
a, secret and confidential nature, especially 
prominent in the work of the Knights of 
Pythias in connection with the order he bore 
an influential part in the movement which led 
to the erection of the Knights of Pythias 
building in Indianapolis. He is also well 
kno\\Ti for his identification with the I. 0. 0. F. 
In his religious affiliations he is a Presbyte- 
rian. 

July 15, IST-l. Mr. Denny was married to 
Miss Carrie \Yright Lowe, a daughter of 
George and ^lavy (Wright) Lowe, who wore 
residents of Indianapolis, the father being a 
pioneer carriage manufacturer. To ^Ir. and 
ilrs. Denny, throe children were bom. as fol- 
lows: Mary, the wife of Joseph P. Elliott. 
Jr., of Riverside, Califoniia, has two sons and 
one daughter; Caroline, wife of Horace F. 
Nixon of Woodbury. New Jersey, a practicing 
law^-er in Camden, has three daughters ; George 
L., in partnership with his father, is married 
and lives at 41 G9 North Pennsylvania avenue, 
his wife being Elizabeth Coleman Hollings- 
worth, of Baltimore. Maryland, whom he mar- 
ried in 1904. He lias one son and two daugh- 
ters. 

WiixiA^r A. PicKEXs.. A leader in the 
practice of law at the Indianapolis bar, Will- 
iam A. Pickens has also represented an un- 
usually active force in the social and economic 
reforms of the citv. He is a Hoosier of the 
pure type, born in Owen County. Julv 2?. 
IS.'iS, and brought up in the usual simple, 
hearty wav on a prosperous Indiana farm. His 
higher education was conducted at the Indiana 
State University and at the Law School of the 
Columbian Fnivcrsitv at Washington, District 
of Columbia. 

Mr. Pickens was admitted to the Indiajia 
bar at- Spencer, in June. 1881. and was en- 
gaged in practice in Owen and adjoining coun- 



ties until July, 1893, when he located at In- 
dianapolis. Since becoming a practitioner in 
that city he has developed marked ability as 
a trial lawyer. While at Spencer he served 
for twelve years as attorney for the Indian- 
apolis and Yincennes Railroad, and for six 
years during the same period as attorney for 
the Louisville, New Albany and Chicago Rail- 
road. He is the senior member of the firm 
of Pickens, Cox and Kahn, whose general 
])racticc covers a broad field. His activities in 
the social and economic fields made him a 
leader in the fine work of the Indiana Tariff 
Reform League, which was organized in 18S9. 
Mr. Pickens was not only a conspicuous con- 
tributor to the literature of the organization, 
but has taken a leading part in the practical 
reform of the state ballot law and the promo- 
tion of other radical legislation. 

Charle.s W. Smith. It is signally con- 
sonant that in a publication of the province 
prescribed for the one at hand there should 
be entered a record concerning Charles W. 
Smith, an honored member of the bar of the 
capital city of Indiana, where he has been en- 
gaged in tlie practice of his profession for 
more than forty years and where he is senior 
nienibor of the firm of Smith & Duncan, which 
represents the oldest law firm in the city and 
which controls a large and iinportant busi- 
ness, ifr. Smith is a native son of Indiana 
and a member of one of its sterling pioneer 
families. It was also his to represent tliis 
commonwealth as a soldier in the Civil War. 
and in tlie work of his profession also has he 
honored his native state through his able and 
conscientious services. 

Charles W. Smith was born on the home- 
stead farm in Washington Township, Hen- 
dricks County, Indiana, on the 3d of Feb- 
runry. 1846. His father. Morgan Lewis Smith, 
was a native of the State of New York, of 
English lineage, and in the old Empire com- 
monwealtli he was reared and educated. In 
1S3'3. when a young man. he came to Indiana 
and settled in Hendricks County, where he 
purchased a tract of land, wlrich he eventually 
reclaimed from the forest, making it one of 
tlie valuable farms in that section of the state. 
In 1834 he returned to the East, and in that 
year was solemnized his marriage to ^liss 
Afargaret Iliff, a resident of New Jersey. She 
was born in Pennsylvania and was of stanch 
Welsh ancestry. Shortly after their marriage 
the young couple set forth for their new home 
in Indiana, and they passed the residue of 
their lives on the homestead farm of whicli 
mention has just been made. Of their four 
children Charles W. was the second in order 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



of birth, and of the number two are now 

living. 

Under the invigorating discipline of the 
fanu, Charles W. Smith was reared to maturity, 
and after duly availing himself of the ad^ 
vantages of the common schools of the locality 
and period he continued his studies in Dan- 
ville Academy, at Danville, Indiana. He 
thereafter completed a course in Asbury Uni- 
versity, now known as DePauw University, at 
Greencastle, Indiana, in which he was grad- 
uated as a member of the class of 1867. In 
the meanwhile, however, he had abandoned his 
studies to respond to the call of higher duty. 
In April, 1864, he enlisted in Company F, One 
Hundred and Thirty-third Indiana Volunteer 
Infantry, for a term of one hundred days, at 
the expiration of which he re-enlisted. Later 
he was transferred to a command of colored 
troops, in which he became an officer and with 
which he served until the close of the war. He 
was mustered out as first lieutenant and adju- 
tant of the One Hundred and Ninth United 
States Colored Infantry, and he duly received 
his honorable discharge after his return to 
Indiana. He has ever retained a deep interest 
in the "'boys in blue" who aided in perpetuat- 
ing the integrity of the nation during the 
dark days of the great internecine conflict, 
and signifies the same by holding membershi]) 
in George H. Thomas Post, No. 17, Grand 
Army of the Republic, in Indianapolis, of 
which post he is senior past commander, l)e- 
sides which he holds membership in the In- 
diana commandery of the Military Order of 
tlie Loyal Legion of the United States. 

^Ir. Smith resumed his collegiate studies 
after the close of his military career, and aft- 
er his graduation in Asbury University he 
located in Indianapolis, where he became a 
student in the law office of the firm of Bar- 
bour & Jacobs, having previously devoted no 
little attention to preliminary study of the 
law. His acqnirements were such j'that in 
1868 he was graduated in the Indiana Law 
School, in Indianapolis. In the same year 
he was admitted to the bar of his native 
state and was admitted to partnership with 
hi-- former preceptors, Messrs. Lucian Bar- 
bour and Charles P. Jacobs, whereupon the 
name of the firm became Barbour. Jacobs & 
Smitli. This alliance continued only one year, 
at the expiration of which Mr. Smith with- 
drew from the firm and became attorney for 
the Singer IManufacturing Company, of which 
position he continued incumbent for two years. 
In the autumn of 1 872 he formed a professional 
partnership with Roscoe Hawkins, with whom 
he was associated in successful general prac- 
tice imtil Mav. 1877. On the 1.5th of the fol- 



lowing month Mr. Smith entered into part- 
nership with John S. Duncan, under the firm 
title of Duncan, Smith & Duncan, which has 
obtained during the long intervening period of 
more than thirty years. Not only is this the 
oldest law firm m the Indiana capital, but it 
is also recognized as one of the most represen- 
tative and substantial. Its course has been 
marked by due conservatism and its members 
have observed most fully the ethics of their 
profession, of whose dignity and responsibili- 
ties they are deeply appreciative. Honor and 
reliability have characterized them in all de- 
partments of their professional work, and they 
have long controlled a large and important 
business, involving identification with various 
heavy litigations in both the State and Federal 
courts. 

Mr. Smith has been unwavering in his devo- 
tion to his chosen profession, and in the same 
his labors have been fruitful and beneficent, 
as his record at the bar well attests. He has 
had naught of ambition for the honors or 
emoluments of public office, but is a stanch 
advocate of the principles and policies for 
which the Republican party stands sponsor. 
He and his wife hold membership in the Merid- 
ian Street IMethodist Episcopal Church and 
arc active in various departments of its work. 
He is well known in the community which has 
r:0 Jong represented his home and here he com- 
mands the unequivocal confidence and esteem 
of his professional confreres and the general 
public. 

On the 12th of October, 1869, was solemn- 
ized the marriage of Mr. Smith to Miss Mary 
E. Preston, of Greencastle, Indiana, and they 
have four children — Margaret, who is the wife 
of Professor \V. C. Abbott, a member of the 
faculty of Yale University; Mary Grace, who 
i< the wife of Henry H. Hornbrook, an attor- 
ney, associated in practice with the firm of 
Smith, Duncan, Hornbrook & Smith; Albert 
P., who is likewise a representative lawyer of 
the younger generation in Indianapolis, where 
he is associated with his father's firm, which is 
now known under the title of Smith, Duncan, 
Hornbrook & Smith; and Kate P., who is the 
wife of S. P. Minear, a representative mer- 
chant of Greensburg, Indiana. 

Thomas L. Sulliv.\x. One who has lent 
dignity and honor to the bench and bar of In- 
diana is Hon. Thomas L. Sullivan, of Indian- 
apolis, who is one of the essentially represen- 
tative lawyers of the capital city, who has 
served with distinction as judge on the bench 
of the circuit court of 'Marion County, and who 
also was incumbent of the office of mayor of 
Indianapolis for two terms. Tlie family of 
which he is a member has bceil prominently 



678 



HISTOKY OF GKEATEB INDIANAPOLIS. 



represented in the legal profession for a num- 
ber of generations, both in Ireland and Amer- 
ica, and the ancestr)- in the Emerald Isle is 
traced through a long and sterling line. 

Judge Sullivan is a native of Indianapolis, 
where practically his entire life thus far has 
been passed. He was bom on the 6th of Oc- 
tober, 1846, and the family home at that time 
was located on the comer of North Capitol 
avenue and West Ohio street, now in the heart 
of the business section of the citj-, — the site 
of the fine interurban terminal building. He 
is a son of Thomas L. and Latitia A. (Smith) 
Sullivan. His father was bom in Madison, 
Indiana, where he was reared to maturity and 
received good educational advantages. He pre- 
pared himself for the l^al profession and 
after his admission to the bar of his native 
state he was for a number of years engaged 
in the practice of his profession in Indian- 
apolis. He served a? captain of a company 
which took an active part in the Mexican war, 
in which he made a gallant record, and a short 
time before the inception of the Civil war he 
removed to Memphis, Tennessee, where he con- 
tinued in practice until his death, which oc- 
curred prior to the close of the war. His wife 
was a daughter of Oliver H. Smith, who was 
one of the honored and influential citizens of 
Indianapolis in the early days and who rep- 
resented Indiana in the Tnited States senate. 
Of the five children Thomas L. of this review 
was the second in order of birth. 

Thomas L. Sullivan, Sr., was a son of Jere- 
miah and Charlotte (Butler) Sullivan, both of 
whom were bom and reared in Virginia. Jere- 
miah Sullivan was bom at Harrisonburg, that 
state, on the 21st of July, 1794, and after due 
preparatorv- training he was licensed to prac- 
tice law by the commonwealth of Virginia, hav- 
ing completed his law course in 1816, prior 
to which he had sened as a soldier in the War 
of 1812, in which he was captain of his com- 
pany. Conceming the career of this honored 
founder of the family in Indiana the follow- 
ing pertinent statements have been previously 
published : "Tempted by the opening west, he 
started, in the company of two young friends, 
for Louisville, Kentucky, making the journev 
on horseback. On his arrival in Cincinnati 
he was advised to go to Madison, Indiana, 
which was recommended to him as a location 
in every way desirable for a young lawj-er. 
Acting upon the advice, he was so well pleased 
with the prospect that he opened an office, and 
he was soon one of the recognized leading 
spirits of the legal fraternity of the then new 
state. Throughout the remainder of his life 
he was prominently identified with the growth 
and progress of his adopted home, going back 



to Alrginia, however, to marry Miss Charlotte 
Butler, of his native town. In 1820 he was 
elected to the state legislature, which at that 
time met in Corjdon, and to him. belongs the 
honor of having selected the name of Indiana's 
present capital. He was one of the c-ommis- 
sioners appointed to choose a site and name 
for a more convenient capital of the growmg 
state, and it was at his suggestion that the 
new c-enter of government was called Indian- 
apolis. His standing in his profession was 
never impaired by his extraneous public serv- 
ice and he was a member of the first supreme 
court of Indiana." 

Judge Jeremiah Sullivan was a son of 
Thomas and ilargaret (Irwin) Sullivan, the 
former of whom figures as the founder of the 
family in America. He came to the new world 
to escape the rigors of the oppressive laws 
forbidding members of the Catholic church to 
hold any office of honor or trust in Ireland, — 
laws under which his father, a prominent bar- 
rister and a man of high intellectual attain- 
ments, had suffered the loss of an official posi- 
tion of importance. Thomas Sullivan inherited 
the alert and receptive mentality ever char- 
acteristic of the family, and after coming to 
.\merica he made his influence felt in a benefi- 
cent way in connection with industrial and 
civic affairs. He married Margaret Irwin, a 
daughter of James Irwin, who removed with 
his family from the vicinity of Chambersburg, 
Pennsylvania, to Augusta " City, Virginia, in 
1780. The young couple settled in Harrison- 
burg, Rockingham County, Virginia, and both 
passed the residue of their lives in the Old 
Dominion. They became the parents of one 
son and one daughter, but the latter died in 
childhood. Of the son Jeremiah, mention has 
already been made in foregoing paragraphs. 

Thomas L. Sullivan, the immediate subject 
of this review, was reared to maturity in his 
native city of Indianapolis, and though his 
father resided for some time in Memphis, Ten- 
nessee, as already noted, he himself remained 
in Indianapolis, being reared in the home of 
his maternal grandfather. Judge Oliver H. 
Smith. After duly availing himself of the 
advantages of the schools of the capital city 
he entered Eacine College, at Racine, Wis- 
consin, in which institution he was graduated 
as a member of the class of 1869. He forth- 
with returned to Indianapolis and began read- 
ing law. He was favored in being able to 
prosecute his technical study under the ef- 
fective preceptorship of the firm of Rand & 
Hall, whose members were numbered among 
the leading members of the bar of the state. 
He further fortified himself for his chosen 
profession by taking a course in the Indiana 



HISTOEY OF GEEATEE INDIANAPOLIS. 



679 



Law School, and in 1878 he was duly admitted 
to the bar. He at once engaged in the prac- 
tice of the profession which his father and 
grandfather had so signally honored through 
their lives and services, and he himself soo^ 
attained to distinctive prominence and success 
as an able advocate and well fortified coun- 
selor at law. He has continued in the practice 
of his profession during the long intervening 
years and in the same has well upheld the 
prestige of the name which he bears. He has 
appeared in connection with much important 
litigation in the state and federal courts and 
his course has been such as to retain to him 
at all times the unqualified respect and esteem 
of the profession in which he has been so dis- 
tinctively successful. 

It may well be supposed that a man of so 
l)road mental ken and so 'distinct individu- 
ality could not be lacking in civic loyalty and 
in public spirit. Thus he has shown a deep 
and abiding interest in all that concerns the 
welfare and progress of his native city, — -a 
city that owes its name to his distinguished 
grandfather. In politics he has ever been 
arrayed as a stanch advocate of the generic 
principles for which the Democratic party 
stands sponsor, and to his well directed labors 
in the cause the party in Indiana owes not a 
little. Gov. Isaac P. Gray appointed him judge 
of the circuit court of Marion County, to fill 
out an unexpired term of two years, and he 
made an admirable record on the bench, show- 
ing a clear apprehension of justice and equity 
in the concrete as well as the abstract sense, 
a thorough knowledge of the minutiae of the 
science of jurisprudence and of precedents, 
and bringing to bear a mind of marked judi- 
cial acumen. Though his party honored him 
with its nomination to succeed himself, he met 
defeat with the rest of the party ticket, though, 
he had the support of many of his professional 
confreres who were of the opposing political 
faith. In 1889 he served as mayor of the city 
of Indianapolis, and the popular confidence 
and esteem in which he is held in the com- 
munity is signified when it is stated that he 
was the first Democratic candidate to have 
been elected mayor of the capital city within 
a period of more than twentv years. He gave 
a business-like and progressive administration 
and continued as chief executive of the munici- 
pal government until 1893, when he retired. 
At present he is the president of the board of 
trustees of the Citizens' Gas Company, to which 
he was appointed bv flavor John Holtzman 
for life, tlie office being without compensation. 
•Tudge Sullivan is identified with various fra- 
ternal and civic organizations in his home citv, 
includins the various bodies of the time-hon- 



ored Masonic fraternity, in which he has at- 
tained to the thirty-second degree in the An- 
cient Accepted Scottish Eite. He and his wife 
are communicants of the Protestant Episcopal 
church, in which they are valued members of 
St. Paul's parish. 

In the year 1875 was solemnized the mar- 
riage of Judge Sullivan to Miss Alice D. 
Moore, who was born and reared at Madison, 
Indiana, a daughter of Joseph Moore, long a 
prominent linker and honored and influential 
citizen of that section of the state. Judge 
and Mrs. Sullivan have four children: Eegi- 
nald H. is following the profession with which 
the family name has been so long and honor- 
ably linked and is one of the representative 
younger members of the bar of Indianapolis, 
where he is a member of the firm of Sullivan 
& Knight; Catherine M. is the wife of John 
E. HoUett, of Indianapolis; Miss Mary L. re- 
mains at the parental home, and Thomas L., 
Jr., M. D., is engaged in the practice of his 
profession. The family holds a position of 
prominence in connection with the representa- 
tive social life of the city and the name is 
one that has been linked with the history of 
the state in a most distinguished way since 
the pioneer epoch of the commonwealth. The 
father of Judge Sullivan was secretary of the 
State Historical Society. 

Chart,es E. Sowder, M. D. One of the 
distinctive incidental functions of this publi- 
cation is to take recognition of those citizens 
of "Greater Indianapolis" who stand distinc- 
tively representative in their chosen spheres of 
endeavor, and in this connection there is emi- 
nent propriety in according consideration to 
Dr. Charles E. Sowder, who is one of the able 
and popular physicians and surgeons of the 
capital city, where he has also been preminent 
in the educational work of his profession, be- 
ing at the present time a valued member of 
the faculty of the medical department of In- 
diana I^niversity. 

Charles Eobert Sowder is a scion of fami- 
lies founded in America in the colonial era of 
our national history and is himself a native 
of the fine old State of Kentucky, having been 
born near Mount Vernon, Eockcastle County, 
on the ]6th of February, 1870, and being a 
son of Daniel E. and Eliza (Cummins) Sow- 
der, both of whom were born and reared in 
Eockcastle County, Kentucky, where the re- 
spective families took up their abode in the 
pioneer days of the history of that common- 
wealth. Madi.«on and Sibbie Sowder, the 
grandparents of Dr. Sowder, were natives of 
western Pennsylvania and were of stanch Ger- 
man lineage. From the old Keystone state 
thcv immisrnted to Kcntuckv and numbered 



680 



HISTOEY OF GREATER INDIAXAPOLIS. 



themselves among the sterling pioneers of Rock- 
castle County, where they passed the residue 
of their lives. In the maternal line Dr. Sow- 
der is of Scotch-Irish genealogy, being a grpd- 

son of and Mahala (Owens) Cummins, 

who likewise were pioneers of Rockcastle Coun- 
tj', Kentucky. Mr. Cummins enlisted in the 
service of the Union at the time of the Civil 
War and was killed in an engagement in the 
State of Tennessee. His wife was a member 
of a family that removed from Lee County, 
Virginia, to Kentucky, in 1785. 

Daniel R. Sowder was reared to manhood in 
his native county and there he became a suc- 
cessful farmer, owning a well improved landed 
estate near Mount Vernon. Through his ar- 
duous service as a soldier in the Civil War 
his health became much impaired, and by rea- 
pon of this fact he was' compelled to retire 
from active labors while still a comparatively 
young man. When the dark cloud of Civil 
War cast its gruesome pall over the national 
horizon, he manifested his intrinsic loyalty and 
patriotism by enlisting in Company K, Four- 
teenth Kentucky Volunteer Cavalry, which gal- 
lant command rendered memorable service in 
defense of the cause of the Union. He con- 
tinued with his regiment in the field until 
1864, when he received his honorable discharge, 
on aQCOunt of physical disability. He made a 
fine fecord as one of the valiant soldiers of the 
republic, but his service made permanent in- 
roads on his health and curtailed his business 
career. Since 188.5 he has lived virtually re- 
tired in the City of Indianapolis, where he is 
held in high regard bv all who know him. He 
is independent in politics and is a consistent 
member of the Christian Church, as was also 
his cherished and devoted wife, who was a 
woman of most gracious personality and who 
was summoned to the life eternal in the year 
1888. Of their four children Dr. Charles R. 
is the eldest; Ralta is the wife of Oliver Gra- 
ham, a representative farmer of Hendricks 
County, this state; Balta is the wife of 0. A. 
Tomlinson, of Indianapolis; and Elizabeth died 
in 1905, at the age of twenty-six years. 

Dr. Charles R. Sowder passed his boyhood 
and youth on the old homestead farm, assisting 
in its work during the summer seasons and at- 
tending the public schools during the winter 
terms until he had attained to the age of 
eigliteon years. He then gave evidence of the 
fart that he had made good use of his edu- 
cational opportunities, for he proved himself 
eligil)le for tlie pedagogic profession, to which 
he devoted his attention for seven years, prin- 
cipally as a teacher in the public schools of 
Hendricks Countv. Indiana. He then, in 1889, 
was matriculated in DePauw University, at 



Greenoastle, this state, in which institution he 
continued his academic studies for two years, 
after which he was a successful popular t.-acher 
in the public schools until 1896, gaining still 
further prestige and more pronounced success 
in this line of occupation. In the year last 
mentioned Dr. Sowder went to the City of 
Chicago, where he attended the Illinois Medi- 
cal College for one term. He was then ma- 
triculated in the Central College of Physicians 
and Surgeons in the City of Indianapolis, in 
which he was graduated as a member of the 
class of 1898 and from which he received his 
well-earned degree of Doctor of Medicine. 
Soon after his graduation he entered the medi- 
cal department of Johns Hopkins University, 
in the City of Baltimore, and after the comple- 
tion of an effective post-graduate course in that 
admirable institution he returned to Indianap- 
olis, where he engaged in the practice of his 
profession and where he also became professor 
of physiology and lecturer on internal medica- 
tion in his alma mater, the Central College of 
Physicians and Surgeons, in which he later 
became incumbent of the chair devoted to the 
diseases of children. Early in 1906 Dr. Sow- 
der became associated with several other rep- 
resentative physicians in the organization of 
the State College of Physicians and Surgeons, 
which, through proper affiliation, became the 
medical department of the University of In- 
diana. In this school he held the professorial 
chair of medicine and medical diagnosis, and 
through his able services as a member of its 
faculty he greatly furthered his prestige as a 
physician and surgeon and as an able factor 
in the educational work of his profession. In 
1908 was effected the consolidation of the 
State College of Physicians and Surgeons and 
the Indiana Medical College and the coalition 
brought about the adoption of the present title 
of the Medical Department of Indiana Uni- 
versity, the institution continuing as the offi- 
cial medical department of the state univer- 
sity'. In this admirably equipped and ably 
conducted school Dr. Sowder is one of the most 
valued members of the facultv, being clinical 
professor of medicine and through his services 
contributing materially to the success and pop- 
ularity of the institution, which has been 
brought up to a specially high standard. He 
is a member of the board of trustees of the 
State College Hospital and in addition to the 
exigent demands placed upon him in connec- 
tion with his educational work and the labors 
of his large and representative private practice. 
Dr. Sowder has been a valuable and frequent 
contributor to the standard and periodical lit- 
erature of his profession, besides which he has 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



served as visiting physician to the Indianap- 
olis City Hospital 

He is essentially enthusiastic in the work of 
his profession and all that pertains thereto, 
and he has prosecuted much original research 
and experimentation in both medicine and suf- 
gei-y, while he is known as somewhat of a 
specialist in the domain of internal medica- 
tion. He holds membership in the American 
Medical Association, the Indiana State Medi- 
cal Society and the Indianapolis Medical So- 
ciety, and his popularity in his profession is 
of the most unequivocal type, being based 
upon his fine attainments, his close observ- 
ance of the unwritten code of ethics and his 
genial and gracious personality. In politics 
he i.= aligned as a supporter of the cause of 
the Republican party, he is identified with va- 
rious civic organizations of local order, and 
both he and his wife are members of the 
Third Christian Church of Indianapolis. His 
fraternal atfiliations are with Oriental Lodge, 
No. 500, Free and Accepted Masons ; the Royal 
Arch Masons.; Lodge No. 56, Knights of 
Pythias; and the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. 

On the 24th of November, 1897, was sol- 
emnized the marriage of Dr. Sowder to Miss 
Orra Bartley, who was born and reared at 
Avon, Indiana, and who is a daughter of R. 
Madison and Catherine (Barker) Bartley. The 
mother, Mrs. Bartley, is dead and Mr. Bartley 
is a resident of Indianapolis. Dr. and Mrs.' 
Sowder had one son, John R., who was born 
on the 29th of :\rarch, 1903, and died in Sep- 
tember, 1909. 

Elliott R. Hooton, prosecuting attorney 
for Marion County, in his private practice has 
been associated with Oran S. Hack for a num- 
ber of years, and in both relations has become 
a leader of the Indianapolis bar. A native of 
Hendricks County, Indiana, born September 
7, 18(57, he is a son of John and Catherine 
Matilda (Worrell) Hooton. His parents were 
also natives of Hendricks County and have 
spent their lives within its limits. Thomas 
Hooton, the paternal grandfather, was a pio- 
neer Kentucky preacher who came to Indiana 
at an early day. The father was a farmer in 
early life, served in the Civil War and for 
years was a clothing salesman. He was too 
easy-going and generous to save money and 
make a business success, but always bevond anv 
suspicion of dishonesty and highly respected, 
as well as thoroughly liked. In 1872. when 
Elliott R. was five years old, tlie family lo- 
lated at Lebanon, Indiana, where the father 
still resides. The mother, who was a woman 
of strong character, was a splendid source of 



inspiration to her five sons, all of whom be- 
came fairly successful. 

Mr. Hooton, of this sketch, was reared at 
Lebanon, leaving school there when seventeen 
years of age to work in a grocery store. The 
financial circumstances of the family prevented 
him from resuming his studies under regular 
instructors, his education thereafter being vir- 
tually the result of self-discipline. As a means 
of self-supi3ort, his employments were varied, 
but eventually the youth obtained a position in 
a hardware store at Lebanon, which he held 
for seven or eight years. For a short time 
i hereafter he was a traveling salesman for the 
Simmons Hardware Company of St. Louis, but 
left the road to assist his brothers, who had 
established a store in that line at Lebanon. 
Somewhat later he and a brother associated 
themseh'es in a grocery venture whose success 
was but of an indifferent nature. In January, 
1896, Mr. Hooton married iliss Amelia Becker, 
of Indianapolis, and in December of that year 
established his residence in that city, soon 
afterward engaging in the real estate business, 
which he abandoned in 1899. 

Throughout all the.se ventures and uncer- 
tainties in business Mr. Hooton kept in view 
his aim for a professional career in the law. 
As a final result of his night studies at the 
Indianapolis College of Law, he accomplished 
his purpose and received from that institution 
the degree of Bachelor of Tjaws in 1900 and that 
of Master of Laws in 1901. With his admis- 
sion to the bar in the former years, he began 
that career which has been such a commend- 
able and gratifying success. At first Jie prac- 
ticed alone, but since 1903 has been in part- 
nership with Oran S. Hack and the professional 
combination makes one of decided strength. 
Mr. Hooton had been an active worker for 
democracy for some years before his party 
promoted him from the ranks, that event oc- 
curring in 1906. when he was elected prose- 
cuting attorney for Marion County. His first 
administration of legal affairs was .so satisfac- 
tory that he was re-elected inl908 and, as the 
e.xpressive phrase goes, is still "making good". 
He was the first secretary and later president 
of the Indiana Democratic Club, and is also 
an active member of the Commercial Club of 
Indianapolis; is further identified with- the 
Knights of Pythias and the Masonic order. 

Thomas R. Marshall, the present governor 
of Indiana, though incumbent of the highest 
executive position in the commonwealth, is es- 
sentially one in interests and purposes with his 
fellow citizens of the state of which he is a 
native son and in which he is a scion of a 
familv whose name has been identified with its 
.innals since the early part of the nineteenth 



682 



HISTOKY OF GEEATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



century. The governor is as thoroughly dem- 
ocratic in a generic sense as he is stanch in 
his adherence to the principles of the historic 
old party that bears the significant name. It 
would be inconsistent with the character and 
attitude of the man to indulge in fulsome com- 
pliment in a sketch of this nature, but his 
prestige as a member of the bar of the state 
and as incumbent of the high office to which he 
has been called by the people of the common- 
wealth, render it imperative that consideration 
be accorded to him in this publication. He is 
a man of broad mind and scholarly attainments 
and his well-ordered official policy as governor 
is winning him uniform commendation. It can 
not be doubted that he is giving the best of 
an essentially strong and loyal nature to the 
service of the people of Indiana, and this 'serv- 
ice will, in the passing of years, assume its 
due proportions in the perspective of Indiana 
history. 

Thomas Eiley Marshall was born at North 
Manchester, Wabash County, Indiana, on the 
14th of March, 1854, and is a son of Dr. Dan- 
iel M. and Martha E. (Patterson) Marshall, 
both representative of patrician lineage and 
of families whose names have been prominently 
identified with our national history since the 
early colonial epoch. John Marshall, the illus- 
trious chief justice of the supreme court of 
the United States, was a grand-uncle of the 
present governor of Indiana. Eiley Marshall, 
paternal grandfather of the governor, was the 
founder of the family in Indiana, whether he 
removed from Greenbrier County, Virginia, in 
the second decade of the last century, number- 
ing himself among the pioneer settlers, first 
locating in Eandolph County and subsequently 
locating in Grant County, where he secured a 
tract of six hundred and forty acres of land, 
including the site of the present thriving city 
of Marion. He reclaimed much of his land 
and was one of the honored and influential 
citizens of that section of the state. He was 
the first clerk of the Circuit Court of Grant 
County. In the maternal line Governor Mar- 
shall is descended from a family that had 
prominent representation in the Continental 
line during the War of the Eevolution. His 
mother was a direct descendant of Charles Car- 
rol], of Carrollton, Virginia, one of the sign- 
er? of the Declaration of Independence. 

Dr. Daniel M. Marshall was born in Ean- 
dolph County, on the oth of March, 1823, and 
his death occurred in Columbia Citv, Indiana, 
on the 10th of October, 1892. He received 
thorough preliminary training of a technical 
order and was long numbered among the rep- 
rppentative physicians and surgeons of north- 
ern Tndiai'a. For a brief interval, just prior 



to the inception of the Civil War, Dr. Mar- 
shall was engaged in the practice of his profes- 
sion at LaGrange, Missouri, and his uncom- 
promising opposition to the institution of hu- 
man slavery caused such antagonism in that 
section that he finally found it expedient to 
return to Indiana. He was a stanch supporter 
of the cause of the Union during the war be- 
tween the states, and was a Democrat in his 
political proclivities. For a long period he 
maintained offices in Wabash, North Manches- 
ter and Pierceton, and was known as one of 
the ablest and most popular physicians in north- 
ern Indiana. He was in the most significant 
sense humanity's friend, and he labored with 
much of intellectual and professional power in 
the uplifting of his fellowmen and in the alle- 
viation of suffering. He was a consistent and 
zealous member of the Presbyterian Church, 
as was also his devoted wife, and the death of 
the latter occurred on the 5th of December, 
1894. They became the parents of one son 
and one daughter, and of the number one son 
is now living. 

Governor Marshall gained his preliminary 
educational discipline in the public schools and 
he then entered Wabash College, at Crawfords- 
ville, this state, in which institution he was 
graduated as a member of the class of 18T3 
and from which he received the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts. It should be noted that he 
is a valued member of the board of trustees of 
his alma mater, and also that he is affiliated 
with the Phi Beta Kappa college fraternity, of 
which Chief Justice John Marshall was the 
founder. 

After the completion of his college course 
Governor Marshall took up his residence in the 
City of Fort Wayne, where he began reading 
law under the able preceptorship of Judge Wal- 
ter Olds, who later became judge of the In- 
diana Supreme Court. On the day which 
marked the attaining of his legal majority, the 
future governor was admitted to the bar, in 
the year 1875. He had taken up his residence 
in Columbia City, Whitley County, in the pre^ 
ceding year, and there he has since maintained 
his home. Concerning his work in his profes- 
sion the following statements were made in an 
appreciative article published at the time of 
his nomination for the office of governor: "His 
practice now extends throughout northern In- 
diana. He is a lawyer of note, who served 
corporations and all other clients alike, but is 
not of the sort that forgets principle and duty 
to his fellowTiien in the furtherance of the in- 
terests of a corporate client who seeks to array 
greed against public interest. He has been an 
important factor in manv of the most famous 
criminal tr-als in this part of the state, and 



HISTORY OF GREATEE INDIANAPOLIS. 



his pleading before juries always attracts 
throngs to the courtroom. He is well known 
as a political and court orator. Mr. Marshall 
is associated in the practice of law with Wa 
F. McNagny and P. H. Clugston, under the 
firm name of Marshall, McNagny & Clugston. 
Mr. Marshall has been a candidate only once 
before in his political career. In 1880 he was 
induced to take the nomination for prose- 
cuting attorney in what was then a strong Re- 
publican district, and was defeated. As a 
party leader Mr. Marshall has always been 
k-nowu for his diligence. In 1896 and 1898 he 
was chairman of the Twelfth District Demo- 
cratic committee and did much hard work for 
the party, making speeches all over the northern 
end of the state. He has always been known 
for his liberality toward the other fellow's 
campaign fund, but when it comes down to his 
own campaign he stands squarely on the plat- 
form of anticurrency. He is called old-fash- 
ioned because of his ideas about a campaign 
fund for himself, but he declares it is a prin- 
ciple that is embedded in his soul." 

Thomas R. Marshall was elected governor of 
Indiana in November, 1908, and in his guber- 
natorial policy and administration, it is suffi- 
cient to say he is fully justifying the confidence 
and suffrages of the voters of the state. He is 
a man of principle, and from the same ex- 
pediency or powerful influences cannot deflect 
him. He is essentially loyal as a man and as 
a citizen, and the interests of the people of 
Indiana are well confided to his care. The gov- 
ernor and his wife are steadfast members of 
the Presbyterian Church, and in the Masonic 
fraternity, in which he takes deep interest, he 
is one of the few men in Indiana who have 
attained to the ultimate and honorary thirty- 
third degree in the Ancient Accepted Scottish 
Rite. 

On the 2nd of October, 1895, Governor 
]\Tarshall was united in marriage to Miss Lois 
Kimscy, of Angola, Indiana, a daughter of 
William E. Kimsey, one of the honored and 
influential citizens of Steuben County, where 
he has served in various positions of public 
tru«t. Governor and ^Irs. Marshall have no 
cliildren. 

Thomas C. Howe, A. 'SL, Ph. D. Butler 
College, located at Irvington, which is now an 
integral part of the city of Indianapolis, may 
well be said to represent the crown of the fine 
educational system which the capital of Indiana 
claims as its own. and at the head of this 
splendid institution stands Dr. Thomas C. 
TTowc. who has been long identified with its 
wnvk and who has been it? president since 
1908. He has gained noteworthy prestige as 
nil able and enthusiastic educator, as a man 



of high scholarship and has proved himself a 
most discriminating and effective adminis- 
trative officer. Further interest attaches to 
his career as one worthy of representation in 
this publication from the fact that he is a 
native son of Indiana and the scion of one of 
its honored pioneer families. 

Thomas Carr Howe was born on a farm in 
Charlestown township, two miles west of 
Charlestown, Clarke County, on the 5th of Au- 
gust, 1867, and is a son of Rev. Robert Long 
and Elizabeth (Carr) Howe, the former of 
whom was born in Wilmington, Clinton Coun- 
ty, Ohio, in 1832, and the latter near Charles- 
town in Clarke County, Indiana, in 1844. Rev. 
R. L. Howe was a son of Thomas Howe, who 
became a pioneer and influential citizen of 
Clinton County, Ohio, where he took an active 
part in public affairs and where he' was a 
stanch Abolitionist in the period leading up 
to the Civil war. He continued his residence 
in that county until his death. The Howe 
family was founded in America in the Colonial 
days, and so far as authentic data determine 
the original representatives in this country 
settled in the vicinity of Sudbury, Massachu- 
setts. Later generations found representation 
in Pennsylvania and Ohio, as well as in south- 
em Indiana. Mrs. Elizabeth (Carr) Howe 
was the twelfth in order of birth of the chil- 
dren of Joseph and Nancy (Drummond) 
Carr. The Carr family settled in Clarke 
County, Indiana, very early in the nineteenth 
century, and was closely identified with the 
civic and industrial development of that sec- 
tion of the state. Joseph Carr was a son of 
Thomas Carr, who was one of the framers 
of the original state constitution of Indiana. 
Two of his sons were valiant soldiers in the 
war of 1812, and were active participants in 
the battle of Tippecanoe, in which conflict the 
brother of Mrs. Nancy (Drummond) Carr also 
participated : he was wounded in the engage- 
ment and, as the result of his injuries, died 
on the succeeding day. The Drummond fam- 
ily was also one of prominence in Clarke Coun- 
ty in the pioneer days. 

Rev. Robert Long Howe was a man of strong 
individuality and of fine mental gifts. He he- 
came a clergyman of the Christian or Disciples 
church and for many years was engaged in 
active ministerial work, in connection with 
which he also owned and supervised the opera- 
tion of two well improved farms in the vicin- 
ity of Charlestown, Clarke County. He served 
for some time as postmaster of that village, 
having been appointed to this office by Presi- 
dent Garfield, and throughout his life was a 
stanch advocate of the principles and policies 
for which the Republican party stands sponsor. 



684 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



He died at Irvington, a suburb of Indianapolis, 
in ISO?. His widow still resides in Irvington. 
They became the parents of three childien, of 
whom two sons and one daughter are now liv- 
ing. Will David Howe, Ph. D., the younger 
son, was born on the 25th of August, 1873. 
He graduated from Butler College with the 
degree of A. B. in 1893, from Harvard Col- 
lege with the degree of A. M. in 1897, and 
from the same institution with the degree of 
Ph. D. :n 1899. He was professor of English 
at Butler College from 1899 until 1906, and 
then became the head of the department of 
English at the Indiana University. He is the 
author of the Howe Readers which have been 
adopted in the schools throughout the state. 
Carrie Rebecca, the only daughter in the fam- 
ily of Rev. and Mrs. Elizabeth (Carr) Howe, 
was born on the 25th of August, 1876, and is 
a graduate of Butler College with the class of 
1897. She is the wife of Professor John Cum- 
mings, a member of the department of eco- 
nomics at Chicago University. 

Dr. Thomas C. Howe is indebted to the pub- 
lic schools of Charlestown, Indiana, for his 
preliminary educational discipline, which in- 
cluded a course in the high school. In 1884 
he entered Butler College as a senior prepara- 
tory student, and was graduated as a member 
of the class of 1889 and with the degree of 
Bachelor of Philosophy. In the following au- 
tumn he became instructor in Latin and Ger- 
man in his alma mater, and in June, 1890, 
he was married and in company with his bride 
went to Europe, where they passed the sum- 
mer in travel, after which he entered Berlin 
University as a student of Germanic language 
and literature. Dr. Howe passed two years 
in Berlin, after which he returned to Indian- 
apolis and assumed the duties of the Arm- 
strong chair of Germanic languages in Butler 
University, a position to which he had been 
appointed prior to bis departure for Berlin. 
In 1896 he entered Harvard University, from 
which he received the degree of Master of Arts 
in the following year, and in 1899 that univer- 
sity granted him the degree of Doctor of Phil- 
osophy. In the year last mentioned Dr. Howe 
made a sojourn of a few months in Europe, 
and then resumed his laljors as a meniber of 
the faculty of Butler College. In the spring 
of 1906 he was made chairman of the endow- 
ment committee to which was assigned the 
completion of the raising of the endowment 
fund of two hundred ami fifty thousand dol- 
lars for Butler College. This work Avas suc- 
cessfully completed in 1907, in the autumn 
of which year Dr. Howe became dean of the 
institution, its president, Scott Butler, A. 'SI., 
LL. D., having retired on a Carnegie pension. 



In the spring of 1908 Dr. Howe was formally 
elected president of Butler College, and his 
administration has been such as not only to 
uphold but also to advance the prestige long 
enjoyed by this worthy institution, which was 
originally known as the Northwestern Chris- 
tian University. 

Dr. Howe has practically devoted his entire 
active career to educational work. He has been a 
very close student of all that is best in litera- 
ture; and his intellectual attainments are of a 
high order. He is identified with the Modern 
Language Association of America, the Indian- 
apolis Literary Club, the Irvington Athenaeum, 
the German House, the Commercial Club and 
the University Club of Indianapolis. For a 
number of years he has been one of the in- 
terested principals in the Armstrong-Landon 
Hardware Company of Kokomo, this state, of 
which he is now the vice president, and he is 
also a member of the directorate of the In- 
dianapolis Water Company. In politics Dr. 
Howe gives unequivocal allegiance to the Re- 
publican party, and in 1905 he represented 
Marion County in the state legislature. He 
and his wife hold membership in the Downey 
Avenue Christian church, of whose official 
board he is the chairman. He is also a mem- 
ber of the Board of Ministerial Relief of the 
Christian Church in the United States and of 
the American Christian Missionary Society, 
the national church board for home missions. 

In the city of Kokomo, Indiana, on the 5th 
of June, 1890, was solemnized the marriage of 
Dr. Howe to Miss Jennie Etta Armstrong, who 
is a daughter of Addison F. and Mary Smith 
(Brandon) Armstronsr. the former of whom 
was born in Clinton County, Ohio, and the 
latter in Henry County, Indiana. The Arm- 
strong family was early settled in Pennsyl- 
vania, and members of the same were promi- 
nent in public affairs during the Revolutionary 
war and the period immediately subsequent 
thereto. From Philadelphia, that state, came 
the founders of the family to Ohio. Addison 
F. Armstrong was one of the prominent busi- 
ness men and honored and influential citizens 
of Kokomo, Indiana, to the development- of 
which along both civic and material lines he 
contributed in generous measure. He was en- 
gaged in the hardware business in IS.j-), and 
with this line of enterprise he continued to be 
actively identified until his death in 1903. 
For many years he was a member of the citv 
council and the board of education. His wife 
survives him and still maintains her homo in 
Kokomo. She is a member of a familv that 
came to Indiana from Kentucky and early 
settled in Henry Countv, this state. Dr. and 
]ilrs. Flowe have four children, whose names 



HISTOEY OF- GEEATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



685 



and respective dates of birth are here indi- 
cated: Mary Elizabeth,- March 33, 1895; 
Charlotte Brandon, November 2, 1900; Thomas 
Carr, August 12, 1904 ; and Addison Arm- 
strong, December 10, 1906. 

William Fortune. The history of William 
Fortune's activities in behalf of civic progress 
contains in large measure the history of the 
most important movements in the municipal 
growth of Indianapolis during the past two 
decades. The breadth of this assertion seems 
justified by a review of his work, and is also 
affirmed by a statement made in a public ad- 
dress in 1903 by Mr. A. L. Mason, who said: 
"I undertake to say that William Fortune has 
contributed more individual energy and has 
achieved greater success in building organiza- 
tions for the carrying out of public reforms 
than any man of his age in the Middle West." 

Before narrating the more personal facts 
of his interesting career, a review of his pub- 
lic activities may be written as a valuable con- 
tribution to the history of modem Indianap- 
olis. 

What may be called the modem era of In- 
dianapolis had its beginning about 1890. At 
that time Mr. Fortune was editorial writer on 
the Indianapolis News, then under the manage- 
ment of John H. Holliday. The extreme 
conservatism which then hindered the physi- 
cal improvement and commercial development 
of the city became the object of attack in sev- 
eral articles written by Mr. Fortune, who 
urged the organization of the progressive citi- 
zens to overcome this obstacle to the city's 
gro\vth. The articles were written opportune- 
ly and received hearty approval, as shown bv 
the manv individual letters sent to the News 
commending the suggestions and offering other 
ideas for the needed work. 

Mr. Fortune's articles had suggested that the 
proper organization to undertake the work was 
the Board of Trade. But when a resolution to 
that effect was brought before the board it was 
defeated. Col. Eli Lilly was one of the few 
members of the board of governors who sup- 
ported the resolution. As soon as this action 
of the Board became known, Mr. Fortune ar- 
ranged by telephone for a meeting pf business 
men at the Bates House the following day. The 
twenty-seven men who attended this meeting 
became the nucleus of the Commercial Club 
of Indianapolis, which was regularly organized 
two davs later with eightv charter members. 
With Colonel Lilly as president and Mr. For- 
tune secretary, the club entered vigorously upon 
its work, and within a month had a thousiid 
members. The important undertakings which 
marked the beginning of a new era for In- 
dianapolis were projected while Colonel Lilly 



and Mr. Fortune were officials of the club. For 
a history of this movement after it had passed 
from the individual to the organized stage, the 
reader is referred to other pages. After serving 
m their respective offices five years, Colonel 
Lilly and Mr. Fortune retired, but the latter 
coiitimied two terms as first vice-president and 
rounded out his career in the work with one 
term as president, finally severing all official 
connection in February, 1898. 

In 1890 the National Paving E.xposition, the 
first exposition of the kind ever held, convened 
in Indianapolis, with Mr. Fortune in charge. 
Its original purpose was to interest the people 
of Indianapolis in good street pavements, and 
to afford them the opportunity of complete in- 
formation as to materials and methods. The 
enterprise, however, attracted such wide atten- 
tion throughout the country that it quickly 
grew into national importance and official dele- 
gates were sent from municipalities in all parts 
of the United States. This exposition marked 
the beginning of modern paving in Indianap- 
olis, not to mention any of its more extended 
benefits elsewhere. 

In 1891 he proposed that a systematic effort 
be made to bring large conventions and meet- 
ings to Indianapolis. He argued that this was 
the best method of advertising the city, and 
also had the substantial immediate benefit of 
bringing a large revenue to the citizens. A 
plan was adopted and a large fund raised for 
the work, which has been continued to the im- 
mense advantage of the cily. 

Mr. Fortune was elected executive director 
of the G. A. R. national encampment which 
was held. in this city in 1893. Greater re- 
sponsibility devolved upon him than was ever 
put upon one man in the management of these 
encampments, and his work involved every de- 
tail of the expense. That was the panic year, 
and the difficulty of raising money caused a 
fear of a deficit. The expenses of the previous 
year at Washington had been $157,000. The 
total amount raised at Indianapolis was $120,- 
000, of which $75,000 was appropriated by the 
city council. Although the Indianapolis en- 
campment was conducted on fully as large a 
scale as in Washington and the accommoda- 
tions for veterans were the best ever provided 
anvwhere, at the close it was found that the 
total expense was only about $63,000. Over 
$43,000 of the citv appropriation was returned 
and about $12,000 of the amount raised bv the 
Commercial Club was left in the treasury. 

An Indiana "good roads movement" was 
started in 1892 through the efforts of Mr. For- 
tune. A Good Roads Congress assembled in 
Indianapolis, with delegates from nearly everv 
county. One of the important results of this 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS 



congress was the formation of the Indiana 
Highway Association. Mr. Fortune declined 
the presidency of the congi-ess, but his work in 
behalf of good roads was made the subject of 
a testimonial from the meeting. He also took 
a prominent part in the Good Roads Congress 
at the World's Fair in 1893. 

The committee of three which had charge of 
the relief for the unemployed in Indianapolis 
during the winter of 1894 consisted of Mr. 
Fortune, H. H. Hanna and Col. Eli Lilly. 
The "Indianapolis plan" of relief, adopted and 
successfully carried out by this committee, at- 
tracted wide attention among charity workers, 
and became the subject of several- magazine ar- 
ticles and is described at length in a pamphlet 
entitled "Relief for the Unemployed". Food, 
fuel- and clothing were provided for unemployed 
people in need imder conditions which elim- 
inated as far as practicable the pauperizing in- 
fluences of charity. The plan embraced the 
establishment of a food market, where, after 
investigation, worthy persons were given credit 
for supplies, issued in regular rations, in pay- 
ment for which they performed labor under the 
direction of the committee. Over five thou- 
sand people were supported in this way, and the 
plan was so successful in avoiding the usual 
results of free charity that for some time after 
the close of the relief work in the spring of 
1894 there were fewer people than usual de- 
pendent upon the Charity Organization So- 
ciety. 

The Indiana State Board of Commerce is 
composed of the commercial organizations of 
the various cities of Indiana, brought together 
for united action in advancing the public and 
commercial interests of the state. Mr. Fortune 
proposed and brought about this organization 
in 1894. He was elected its president in 1897 
and again in 1898 and 1899. The State Board 
of Commerce, under the leadership of Mr. For- 
tune, inaugurated the movement for the reforms 
in countv and township government which re- 
sulted in the changes in county administration 
made by the legislature about 1900. It is es- 
timated that these changes, in the first year of 
their operation, saved the people over three 
million dollars. 

Mr. Fortune was one of tlie original members 
of the Commercial Club Elevated Railroad 
Commission, appointed in 1894. He and Colo- 
nel Lilly spent manv vears in agitating the 
abolition of grade crossing? by means of track 
elevation. Mr. Fortune was appointed chair- 
man of the commission in .Tune. 1898, to fill 
the vacancv caused bv the death of Colonel 
Lilly. In 1898 the ordinance was nassed re- 
quiring track elevation. The ra'lroads resisted, 
and it was only after the courts, the legislature 



and local political campaigns had given their 
approval to the measure that the public 
triumphed over the corporations. The city 
charter was so amended as to provide for con- 
tinued progress in the elevation of tracks. 

From the time of its organization Mr. For- 
tune was until 1905 a member of the executive 
committee of the Citizens' League, being asso- 
ciated in this work with Thomas C. Day, T. E. 
GriSith, Father F. H. Gavisk, Lucius B. Swift, 
A. L. Mason and G. E. Hunt. Though he has 
long been identified with the important pub- 
lic undertakings which have created the mod- 
ern character of Indianapolis, Mr. Fortune is 
only a man in the prime of life and naturally 
looks forward to many years of continued use- 
fulness to city and state. 

William Fortune was born in Boonville, War- 
rick County, Indiana, May 27, 1863. He is of 
French and Scotch descent on his mother's 
side — the St. Clairs of Kentucky and Virginia. 
His great-grandfather was Raymond St. Clair 
and his grandfather was Isaac St. Clair. On 
his father's side the family (Fortune-Shoe- 
maker) is of French and German origin. Al- 
though the St. Clairs were large slave owners, 
the Kentiicky branch of the family took the 
Union side, and five of the six uncles of Will- 
iam Fortune served through the war on the 
Federal side. William H. Fortune, father of 
William, was one of the first to enlist in Com- 
pany A of the First Indiana Cavalry, and 
served till mustered out at the close of the war. 
After the war he located at Murfreesboro, Ten- 
nessee, in the summer of 1865, but met re- 
verses which caused him to return north after 
eighteen months For the next few years the 
family lived at Paxton (111.), Seymour, Shoals, 
Mitchell and Evansville in Indiana, finally re- 
turning to Boonville. 

At these various places William Fortune 
spent his youth, passing, his ninth to eighteenth 
year at Boonville. In 1876 he became appren- 
tice in the printing office of the Boonville Stan- 
dard. M. B. Crawford, the editor, took much 
interest in training the boy as a writer, and be- 
fore he was sixteen years old he was doing 
much of the editorial work of the paper. At 
the age of seventeen he wrote and published 
a history of his native count}', from the profits 
of which he was enabled to provide for the 
family, which had become dependent upon him, 
while he sought a new field of work. 

In Jamiary, 1882, he became a reporter on 
the Indianapolis Journal. His reports of the 
sessions of the Indiana general assembly in 
1883-4 were the cause of several rather dramatic 
incidents, resulting finally in an attempt by the 
Democratic majority to expel him on the last 
dav of the session. Enough of the Democratic 



HISTOKY OF GKEATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



687 



senators voted on his side to make a tie, and 
the deciding vote of Lieutenant-Governor Man- 
son was cast in his favor. A little later he suc- 
ceeded Harry S. New as city editor of the 
Journal, but resigned in the spring of 1888 on 
account of ill health. Then he founded the 
Sunday Press, with Mrs. Emma Carleton as 
associate editor. It had high literary quality, 
with some of the best known people of the state 
among its contributors, but its publication was 
discontinued at the end of three months, with- 
out financial loss to any of the stockholders ex- 
cept Mr. Fortune, who assumed the losses. 

The nomination of Harrison for president 
made Indiana the battle center in the cam- 
paign of 1888, and, as the «ptecial representa- 
tive of several leading newspapers, including 
the New York Tribune, Philadelphia Press 
and Chicago Tribune, Mr. Fortune did some 
notable work as political correspondent. A lit- 
tle later he declined an offer of the position of 
Washington correspondent for the Chicago 
Tribune. 

Soon afterward his efforts were turned into 
the new channel afforded by his connection with 
the Commercial Club and its campaign for city 
improvement. In this field he showed the abil- 
ity to "do things" and the energy and enthusi- 
asm and indomitable spirit needed in under- 
taking imtried plans and spurring others into 
activity in the same work. His ambition "to 
make Indianapolis a model city" has since af- 
forded him a range of effort such that he had 
to abandon newspaper work, and his principal 
work has since been in connection with the en- 
terprises already described. 

His management of the National Paving Ex- 
position in 1890 suggested to him the need of 
a publication devoted especially to municipal 
improvements, and, with William C. Bobbs as 
business manager, soon afterward issued Pav- 
ing and Municipal Engineering as a 16-page 
journal. This has since become the Municipal 
Engineering Magazine, which is the pioneer and 
the recognized authority in that field in Amer- 
ica. It is a prosperous publication devoted to 
the practical affairs of American municipalities. 
He is president of the company which owns the 
publication and for a number of years was its 
editor. He is president of the New Telephone 
Company of Indianapolis and in January, 1908, 
was elected president of the Inter-State Life 
Assurance Company; is also president of the 
Indianapolis Telephone Company, vice-presi- 
dent in active charge of the New Long Dis- 
tance Telephone Company, to which he largely 
devotes his titae ; these being his principal busi- 
ness activities at this time. 

In February. 1898. a loving cup was pre- 
sented to 'Mt. Fortune bearing the inscription 



"To William Fortune, from citizens of Indian- 
apolis in recognition of his services in promot- 
ing the general welfare of the city." The 
presentation of the loving cup was accompanied 
by an engrossed testimonial signed by one hun- 
dred leading citizens headed by the name of 
Benjamin Harrison. 

It was largely through personal relatiojis with 
^[r. Fortune that Wong Kai Kah, the Chinese 
diplomat, was influenced to establish his home 
in Indianapolis while in America, and through 
him Prince Pu Lun was invited to become the 
guest of Indiana and Indianapolis for a week 
in 1904. In 1905 the Emperor of China, by 
letter patent, conferred upon Mr. Fortime the 
mandarin rank and also gave him the decora- 
tion of the Order of the Double Dragon. 

Through the Commercial Club in 1902 Mr. 
Fortune offered a gold medal to the pupil of 
the public schools writing the best essay on 
the topic "Why we take pride in Indianapolis", 
the object being to stimulate home pride and 
public spirit in the young people. This prize 
was afterwards offered annually by the Commer- 
cial Club, and the design for the medal has been 
used for various public purposes. 

Mr. Fortune was the first president of the 
Indianapolis Press Club, organized in 1891. He 
was one of the organizers of the Century Club 
and was its president in 1892. He was presi- 
dent of the Automobile Club of Indiana for 
two years. He is a member of a number of 
cfubs, including, besides those mentioned, the 
Country Club, the Columbia Club, the Univer- 
.'^ity Club, and the Woodruff . Club, all of In- 



Mr. Fortune married, November 25, 1884, 
Miss May Knubbe, daughter of Frederick and 
Jerusha A. Knubbe. She died September 28, 
1898, leaving. three children: Kussell, Evelyn 
and Madeline. Evelyn is the wife of Mr. Eli 
Lillv of Indianapolis, a grandson of Col. Eli 
Lilly. 

Salem D. Clark. A young Indianapolis at- 
torney of present prominence and greater prom- 
i.sc. state senator of Indiana, Hon. Salem D. 
Clark is a native of Hoosierdom, born on a 
farm in Hendricks County, May 13, 1872. His 
parents are Daniel M. and Clarinda (Dicker- 
son) Clark, natives of Butler County, Ohio, of 
English descent, the father being a farmer and 
a carpenter. 

S. D. Clark was the thirteenth of fourteen 
children and, up to date, has very successfully 
defied the fact. After completing the education 
to be obtained in the township school, he en- 
tered Central Ipdiana Normal School at Dan- 
ville and later became a student at Valparaiso 
(Ind.) College, where he pursued both com- 
mercial and scientific courses. As he had 3e- 



HISTOKY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



c-idcd upon law as his profession, but was saili}' 
dutic-ic'Ut jn L'lluL-ational funds, lie became an 
employe of the Central Indiana State Asylum 
for some time, assisted his brother in his farm- 
ing, and assumed anything which offered hon- 
est financial returns. He finally entered the 
Indiana Law School of the University of In- 
dianapolis, from which he graduated in May, 
liSOS, when ho was also admitted to the bar. 

Mr. Clark has been in active and expanding 
practice since 1899. His stanch work for the 
Democracy was placed in public evidence in 
1908, as in the fall of that year he was honored 
with election to thej-tate senatorship. His wife, 
whom he married November 1, 1899, was for- 
merly Jliss Emma Pence, of Wa\-ue Township, 
Clarion County, Indiana, and for several years 
before her marriage a teacher in the public 
schools. 

Jaiiks S. Cruse. The interposition of the 
reliable and enterprising real estate dealer and 
agent has a potent influence in connection with 
th(! development and upbuilding of any city, 
and among the able and representative ex- 
ponents of this important line of business in 
Indiana's capital city is Mr. Cruse, one of the 
loyal and progressive citizens of "Greater In- 
dianapolis". 

]\Ir. Cruse was born in New Albany, Floyd 
County, Indiana, on the 16th of July, 1858, and 
is a son of John P. and Annie M. (Dudley) 
Cruse, the former of whom was born in the 
City of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and the lat- 
ter in Virginia. Their marriage was solemnized 
at New Albany, Indiana, where they continued 
to reside iintil 186"2, when they removed to In- 
dianapolis, where they passed the residue of 
their lives. In his earlier business career the 
father was a contractor and builder, but he 
eventually became an extensive manufacturer 
of and dealer in brick, with which line of en- 
terprise he continued to be identified until his 
death. Of the two children the subject of this 
review is the elder, and his sister, Mary B., is 
tlie wife of Henry J. Wiethe, of Indianapolis. 

.Tames S. Cruse was about four vears of age 
at the time of the family removal to Indian- 
apolis, where he was reared to maturity and 
where he duly availed himself of the advan- 
tages of the public schools. As a boy he l)egan 
to assist in the work of his father's brick yard, 
and eventually he was given charge of the 
books, accounts and orders. Later he assumed 
a clerical position in the abstract office of John 
H. Batty, with the nmnagement of whoso busi- 
ness he continued to lie identified until the 
death of !Mr. Batty, after which he was em- 
liloyed by the lattci-"s successor for some time. 
Within these years he gained an accurate and 
intimate knowledge of real estate values in 



Marion Couniy, as well as the state in gen- 
eral. After retiring from the abstract otKce 
he was employed for a short time in the real 
estate rental agency of Giles S. Bradley. He 
next engaged with the firm of Daiu & McCul- 
lough. who conducted a general real estate and 
lental agency, continuing in the employ of this 
firm for some time and later having being sim- 
ilarlj" engaged with the agency conducted in- 
dividually by Mr. Dain. Upon the death of 
Mr. Dain, 5Ir. Cruse purchased the business, and 
during the intervening period of about a quar- 
ter of a century he has held prestige as oue 
of the leading real estate dealers of the cap- 
ital city, where, his business is conducted under 
the titk^ of the J. S. Cruse Realty Company. 
This company was incorporated under the laws 
of the state on the 19th of December, 1908, and 
since that time Mr. Cruse has held the office 
of president, llie business of the concern is 
of wide scope and importance, involving the 
handling of all kinds of city, suburban and 
farm property, the agency for many rental 
properties, rent collections, etc. The books of 
the company show at all' times most desirable 
investments, and the high reputation of the 
interested principals gives to the business a con- 
stantly cumulative tendency. Mr. Cruse is also 
president of the ^farion Title Guaranty Com- 
pany, one of the important financial and fidu- 
ciary organizations of the state. His success, 
and it has been of no equivocal order, repre- 
sents direct result of his own well directed ef- 
forts, and he is one of the honored citizens and 
representative business men of the city which 
has been his home from his childhood days. 

In politics ^Ir. Cruse gives an unwavering 
allegiance to the Republican party, but he has 
never had aught of desire for the honors or 
emoluments of public office. He is a member 
of the Columbia, Commercial and Marion Clubs 
and also of the Indianapolis Board of Trade, 
in whose progressive work he accords a hearty 
co-operation. In the Masonic fraternity Mr. 
Cruse has attained to the thirty-second degree 
of the Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite, in which 
he is affiliated with Indiana Sovereign C(insis- 
tory. Sublime Princes of the Royal Secret, and 
is also a member of the allied organization. 
]\rurat Temple. Ancient Arabic Otder of the 
Nobles of the :\[vstic Shrine. 

In 1896 Mr. Cruse was united in marriage 
to Miss Fannie Jones, daughter of the late 
William H. Jones, of Indianapolis, and they 
have no children. 

Willia:m T. Bnowx has been engaged in the 
practice of law in the City of Indianapolis for 
more than thirty years and is uniformly rec- 
ognized as one of the representative members 
of the bar of the state. It is, in the vernacular 



HISTOKY OF GREATER INDIAXAI'OLIS. 



of the fox chase, a "far cry" from the position 
of a mere lad working as a section liand on a 
railroad to that of a jDrominent member of the 
legal profession in a state within whose bor- 
ders this rise has occurred, and yet this, in 
brief, indicates the measure of personal accom- 
plishment which stands to the credit and honor 
of ilr. Brown, who has been in the most sig- 
nificant sense the architect of his own fortunes 
and who has been dependent upon his own re- 
sources from his boyhood days. 

William T. Brown was born near Marietta, 
Cobb County. Georgia, on the 23d of Septem- 
ber, 1850, and is a son of Burrell E. and Keziah 
(George) Brown, both of whom were natives 
of South Carolina and both of whom passed 
the closing years of their lives in the state of 
Georgia. The father was a blacksmith by trade 
and the family history is one that may be desig- 
nated, in the words of Abraham Lincoln con- 
cerning his own famih^ "the short and simple 
annals of the poor." In his native state the 
subject of this review gained the rudiments of 
an education, and in 1864, when fourteen years 
of age, he came to Indiana, arriving in April 
of that year and soon afterward finding em- 
ployment as a section hand on the line of the 
old J. J[. & I. railroad. He was thus engaged 
until the following November, when he came 
to Indianapolis, where he has maintained his 
home during the long intervening years. Here 
he found employment in a rolling mill, and for 
several years he continued to be identified with 
this line of work, the while he had the ambi- 
tion and tenacity of purpose to husband his 
limited financial resources in order to utilize 
the same in securing higher educational train- 
ing. At the head ojf the rolling mill was John 
Thomas, a man of sterling character and help- 
ful sympathy. He gave to Mr. Brown all pos- 
sible encouragement and aid while the latter 
was working his way through college, and 'Mr. 
Brown has ever felt a debt of appreciative 
gratitude to this kind and considerate friend 
and counselor of his youthful davs. ^Ir. Brown 
was finally enabled to enter the preparatory de- 
partment of Wabash College, at Crawfordsville. 
and in this institution he eventually completed 
the work of the junior year, leaving the college 
in 1874. In the meanwhile he had continued 
to work in the rolling mill during the vaca- 
tions of the college year. Upon leaving college 
Mr. Brown became a student in the law office 
of the firm of Gordon, Browne & Lamb, of In- 
dianapolis, and with such aviditv and such ex- 
cellent powers of absorption and assimilation 
did he prosecute his studv of the science of 
jurisprudence that he gained admission to the 
Indiana bar in the Centennial vear. 187fi. In 
1878 he opened an office in what is now the 



Indiana Trust Company building, and during 
the intervening }'ears he has here maintained 
his professional headquarters, while he has 
moved onward to precedence as one of the lead- 
ing representatives of his profession in the cap- 
ital city. In 1878 he was appointed chief dep- 
uty prosecuting attorney, imder John B. Elam, 
and in 1883 he was elected prosecuting attor- 
ney of Marion County, of which office he re- 
mained incumbent for two years, giving an ad- 
mirable administration and thereby gaining 
further prestige as a strong and versatile trial 
lawyer. In 1897 Mr. Brown was appointed 
county attorney, and he held this position un- 
til 1900. He has been identified with a large 
amount of important litigation in the state and 
federal 'courts and has appeared in connection 
with the trial of a number of the most cele- 
brated criminal causes presented in the local 
courts. 

In politics Mr. Brown has ever been found 
aligned as a loyal and active supporter of the 
cause of the Republican party, though he has 
never sought or held public office except such 
positions as have been in direct consonance with 
the work of his profession. In the Masonic 
fraternity he is identified with local York Rite 
bodies, as well as with the Indianapolis con- 
sistory of the Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite. 
He and his wife are zealous and valued mem- 
bers of the Central Avenue Methodist Episcopal 
Church, and he has been a member of its offi- 
cial board for more than a quarter of a cen- 
tury. He holds membership in the Marion and 
the Commercial Clubs, two of the representa- 
tive social organizations of the capital city, and 
is also identified with the Indiana Bar Asso- 
ciation. 

On the 26th of August, 1884, was solemnized 
the marriage of Mr. Brown to ]\Iiss Hattie E. 
Sperry, of Fulton, New York, in which state 
she was born and reared, being a daughter of 
Ira and Lovina H. Sperrv. 

Col. Ei.i Lilly during his active career in 
Indianapolis did not have a superior among 
his contemporaries either in the practical 
achievements of business or in the civic pride 
and energy which have made Indianapolis a 
great city. .\s founder of the great manu- 
facturing drug house of Eli Lilly Company 
he gave the city one of its greatest business 
institutions. And through his leadership in 
the civic movement which began with the or- 
ganization of the Commercial Club, he was one 
of the founders of the modern era of Indian- 
apolis history. 

He was bom at Baltimore, Maryland, July 
S. 1839, and died in Indianapolis June 6, 1898. 
When he was a year old his parents, Gnstavus 
and Esther E. Lilly, moved to- Lexington, Ken- 



HISTORY OF GREATEK INDIANAPOLIS. 



tucky, and in 1848 to Gallatin County, that 
state, and three years later located at Green- 
castle, Indiana. 

He was thirteen years old when he moved 
to Greencastle, and continued his hitherto lim- 
ited schooling in a private school and also iu 
the preparatory department of Asbury (now 
DePauw) University. For a time he published 
the Asbury Notes, the college paper of the 
time, this being his' first business experience. 
Soon afterward he became a drug clerk, which 
introduced him to the field in which he was 
destined to make his great business success. 
At the age of seventeen he became clerk to 
Henry LawTcnce. an English chemist and 
pharmacist of Lafayette, Indiana, under whom 
he gained both a practical and theoretical 
knowledge of the business. 

At Lafayette he became a member of the 
local company of Guards. This training and 
experience was prelude to another conspicuous 
period of his life. He was in the drug busi- 
ness at Greencastle when the Civil War broke 
oui. Though his father was an abolitionist, 
and said to have been a station agent on the 
"underground railroad," the son had more 
conservative views of the institution of slav- 
ery, and in fact voted for Breckenridge rather 
than for Douglas in 1860. However, he op- 
posed disunion, and when the war broke out 
he was one of the most enthusiastic Union men 
in his vicinity and thenceforth supported Lin- 
coln and the war with all the ardor of his 
being. 

He was one of the first to enlist in what 
subsequently became the First Indiana Heavy 
Artillery, which was organized at Indianapolis 
in Julj', 1861. His previous training and his 
efficiency as a soldier soon brought him more 
responsible duties. As captain, he was as- 
signed the task of recruiting a battery, which 
subsequently became the famous Eighteenth 
Indiana Batter}'. In two weeks the full bat- 
tery was recruited, the oflBcers selected, and it 
was mustered in August 20, 1862. Lieutenant 
Campbell, of Crawfordsville, a member of the 
battery, wrote : "He was an exceedingly young 
man for so important a position, as the com- 
mand of a battery in those days was more 
complex and important than the command of a 
regiment of infantry. His youthful and slen- 
der appearance was decidedly against him, the 
men of the battery thought, as they gathered 
together at Camp Morton in the middle of the 
summer of 1862. But the first day of active 
service in which the battery participated dis- 
pelled all doubts as to the ability and quali- 
fications of the youthful captain. From that 
time on there was no doubt of his fitness and 
abilitv." 



The words of the same writer may be quoted 
as the best description of Colonel Lilly's mili- 
tarj- experience. To continue the above: 

"The rapid advance of the rebel army under 
Bragg and the retreat of Buell to Louisville, 
during the latter part of the summer of 1862, 
required all the raw troops to be hurried down 
to the Ohio River. In this hurried movement 
all his admirable qualities as an organized and 
disciplinarian were developed. In the space 
of twenty-four hours he transformed a green 
lot of men who had never seen a piece of artil- 
lery, and harnessed and hitched a new lot of 
unbroken horses together for the first time 
into an effective battery ready for action. 
September 1 Captain Lilly drew his guns and 
caissons from the arsenal at Indianapolis, 
loaded them on flatcars on the Jeffersonville 
Railroad, reached Jeffersonville the next day 
about 9 o'clock, drew his complement of horses 
and camp equipage from the quartermaster, 
and by the greatest exertion the battery was 
harnessed, hitched and moved down to the 
river, ferried over and assigned a place in the 
lines of defense around Louisville in the after- 
noon of the same day. There his untried men 
stood in line of battle, while the tired and 
dusty veterans of Buell marched past into the 
city. 

"During the winter Colonel Lilly's battery 
was changed into a mounted battery. Four 
more guns were added, making it a ten-gun 
battery, and the entire command was attached 
to the famous Wilder's brigade of mounted 
infantry, and made a part of the Fourteenth 
Army Corps under Gen. George H. Thomas. 
The first severe engagement in which the Lilly 
battery participated was at Hoover's Gap, 
Tennessee, July 24, 1863,— the first day of 
Rosecrans' strategic advance on Chattanooga. 
For four hours Colonel Lilly stubbornly held 
his battery on the brow of a hill and poured 
a triple charge of grape and canister into 
successive charges of two brigades of Clai- 
liorne's division, which vainly attempted to 
drive the Union troops out of the gap. All 
the while the battery received the shot and 
shell from two batteries of six guns belongilig 
to the brigade opposing it. By deftly retiring 
the guns below the crest of the hill so that 
the muzzles just cleared the greensward of the 
brow, he deceived the aim of the rebel batteries 
and greatly shielded his men from slaughter, 
as the rain of shot and shell tore up the earth- 
work on the crest of the slope. Colonel Lilly 
dismounted from his horse and was everv- 
where through the battery directing the aim 
of his men and encourasring them, his presence 
inspiring confidence and courage. He fre- 



HISTORY OF GEEATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



GDI 



queutly helped a tired powder boy carry up 
ammunition from the caisson. 

•'The Tullahoma campaign^ which followed 
the battle of Hoover's Gap, was very trying on 
the battery. There were twenty-one days of 
constant rain, which, upon the barren of Ten- 
nessee, made movement almost impossible. 
With only Wilder's brigade on one side of the 
river, Bragg's entire army on the other, it 
looked as if they could never get back over 
those mountains, had the enemy succeeded in 
crossing the Tennessee River and successfully 
attacking them. At noon on the 21st day of 
August, 1863, Colonel Lilly's guns opened on 
the Confederate stronghold of Chattanooga, 
right in the face of the whole of Bragg's army, 
and to the consternation and surprise of that 
great general himself, as the hasty removal of 
his headquarters afterward testified. It was 
Jeff Davis 'fast daj", and the citizens were 
all at church when the loud booming of Lilly's 
guns disturbed their surroundings, and they 
hastily left their churches without ceremony. 
No shells were fired into the • town, but the 
skill of the commander was devoted to sink- 
ing two steamboats, the Dunbar and the Paint- 
rock, which were lying by the shore. This was 
successfully done after a half hour's firing, and 
the men of the brigade breathed easier as they 
saw the boats sink. The combined forces, 
consisting of nineteen guns in all, directed fire 
upon the Lilly battery from noon till dark, but 
their range and aim was so imperfect that the 
battery escaped with the loss of only one man 
and four horses, all killed by the same shell. 

"The next morning a miry-looking man ap- 
peared before Colonel Lilly. He said he had. 
just swam the Tennessee River, that his name 
was Bill Critchfield and he owned the Critch- 
field House over in Chattanooga that General 
Bragg was using for headquarters, and he 
wanted to see Colonel Lilly 'knock hell' out of 
his house. The gentleman was soon accommo- 
dated, and from his perch in a tree near one 
of the guns he had the satisfaction of seeing 
several shells go through his own house and 
explode on the inside, and the hasty exit of 
all occupants. (In this Critchfield House was 
published a paper which was edited by Henry 
Watterson.) 

"In the battle of Chickamauga, which be- 
gan about noon Friday, September 18, at Alex- 
ander's bridge, Colonel Lilly's battery fired 
the first shell on the advancing army of Bragg, 
which was really the opening of the great bat- 
tle known in history as Chickamauga. On the 
Saturday of the great battle Wilder's brigade 
and Colonel Lilly's battery formed part of the 
main line of battle on the right of the Four- 
teenth Corps. About 3 o'clock on the after- 

Vol. II— 4 



noon of that awful day Colonel Lilly did as 
daring a deed as ever took place m the his- 
tory of the Army of the Cumberland. In front 
of a part of Wilder's brigade and midway be- 
tween the lines of the tWo contending armies 
ran a ditch parallel to the line of battle. The 
rebels would charge our lines, get as far as 
this ditch and then drop into it out of range 
of our fire, and our men could not dislodge 
thein. Just after a very heavy tire of the 
enemy's lines and while this ditch was full 
of rebel soldiers. Colonel Lilly limbered two 
guns of his battery, galloped out to a point 
at the head of the ditch, where the guns could 
rake it from end to end, and opened out with 
triple charges of grape and canister down that 
ditch, dealing death and carnage with every 
shot. There stands today, on the battlefield 
of Chickamauga, on the identical spot occu- 
pied by this brave man, two cannon placed in 
position, to commemorate this act of bravery 
on that eventful day. During some of the ter- 
rific charges made on our lines by Longstreet's 
men. Colonel Lilly rode on his horse from his 
caissons to his guns, bringing up armloads of 
grape and canister to hurl at the enemy. Dur- 
ing the pursuit of Wheeler, immediately after 
the battle of Chickamauga, when for twenty- 
one days our cavalry and mounted troops kept 
up a tight with this Confederate general. Col- 
onel Lilly constantly pushed his command on 
the skirmish line, and whenever the rebels 
ma'de a stand his guns were always in position, 
and the boom of his cannon was a signal for 
a spontaneous charge. So much faith did the 
troops have in the etfectiveness of his battery 
that when the horses of the guns WoUld give 
out by the roadside, the troopers of the brigade 
would dismount from their own horses and 
give them up for the use of the artillery in 
order to have the battery along with them. 

"At the battle of Mossy Creek, December 
29, 1863, our forces were driven back. When 
the order to fall back was received all the 
horses belonging to one of Colonel Lilly's guns 
had been killed, and one gun was left on the 
hill as the troops fell back. Colonel Lilly 
went to General McCook, commanding the 
L'nion cavalry, and begged of him' to give him 
a company of cavalry to make a charge and 
bring oft' that gun. General McCook said he 
had no troops available except a small body 
of scouts, but he could take them. Colonel 
Lilly, with this small body of men, led a 
charge up the hill to his gun, driving the enemy 
liack, and brought the piece safely into Union 
lines. 

"All through the winter of 1863 Colonel 
I.illv operated with General ilcCook's cavalry 
in east Tennessee. During the entire winter 



692 



HISTORY OF GREATEE INDIANAPOLIS.. 



the troops drew no rations, excepting coffee 
and occasionally a box of hard-tack. They 
lived exclusively off' the country. He never 
rested himself until his men and teams had 
something to eat. If there was anything in 
the country Colonel Lilly saw that his men 
had some of it. No commander looked after 
his men more conscientiously than did Colonel 
Lilly. , He was always on the alert for his 
"'boys', as he always called them, and he never 
let them suffer if there was anything he could 
possibly do to prevent it. 

"During the two and a half years he was 
in command of the battery he was forty-one 
times under fire and was twice struck by bul- 
lets, but escaped with only slight wounds. 
During the spring of 1864, while the Anny of 
the Cumberland was preparing for the At- 
lanta campaign. Colonel Lilly came home on 
a short leave of absence, when Governor Mor- 
ton, recognizing the ability and dash of the 
young officer, tendered him the position of 
major of the Ninth Indiana Cavalry. This 
commission was accepted and he resigned his 
position of captain of the Eighteenth Indiana 
Battorv and was mustered major of the Ninth 
Cavalry, April -t, 1SG4. December 2-ith of the 
same vear he was ]iroinoted to be lieutenant 
colonel. 

"Colonel Lilly left his battery with pro- 
found regret, but under the then existing or- 
ganization of the Indiana batteries no pro- 
motion above a captain could be made, and 
he justly deserved a higher command and 
made the change on tliat account only. The 
battery reluctantly gave him tip. His cour- 
age, ability and his devotion to his men had 
so endeared him to their hearts that to the 
day of his deatli the love they then bore him 
lived in memory too deep to ever die out." 

r.y the o\crwiiclming forces of General For- 
rest, and because of the lack of ammunition, 
Jfajor Lilly surrendered at Elk River, Ten- 
nessee, September 22. 18fi4, and for some 
months, until exchanged, he and his men were 
hold prisoners in Mississippi. At the close of 
the war he was in command at Port Gibson, 
Mi*.-is.sippi. ■ 

He remained in the south for about a year 
after the war. and attempted cotton planting, 
on a plantation which he leased. He had in- 
different success and furthermore nearly lo^t 
his health. Broken in body and with scarce- 
ly a dollar he came north and began working 
for tJie wholesale drug house of H. Dailey & 
Company at Indianapolis. Later his experi- 
ence and skill in the drug l)usiness were put 
against a partner's capital in a drug store at 
Paris, Illinois. In 18T3 he returned to In- 



dianapolis, which ever afterward remained his 
home. 

Following a brief partnership in the manu- 
facturing business he began in a modeSt man- 
ner the business from which the present Eli 
Lilly Company originated. In a small store 
room, situated at the rear of the site now oc- 
cupied by the Commercial Club building, and 
facing on the alley, he began to manufacture, 
out of pure drugs, the medicines prescribed 
by physicians. He compounded a stock, then 
went out and sold it to the trade. His drugs 
were of the highest quality, and this and the 
skill with which they were put up made them 
popular and in permanent demand. His trade- 
increased to a point where he had to remain 
in the shop all the time, while his brother, 
James E., acted as salesman. The process of 
business growth went on rapidly, and without 
describing in detail it is sufficiently impres- 
sive to compare the little shop on the allev 
with the present laboratory building in which 
the Lilly drugs are made, a complete medicine 
bouse with a reputation which has passed be- 
yond the boundaries of the United States. 

One incident illustrates Colonel Lilly's quick 
compreliension and alertness in turning an idea 
to business advantage. Dr. J. Marion Sirams 
told him of the rare medical qualities of a 
plant which Dr. McDade of Alabama had dis- 
covered among the Indians. He at once 
sought out Dr. McDade in Alabama, investi- 
gated the properties of the plant, and made a 
contract for a su])ply. A short time later Dr. 
.McDade, to his surprise, received an order for 
several thousand ])ounds of the plant. The 
medicine, through general prescription by 
])hysicians, has become a standard remedy, 
and the success of the Lilly Company is due 
more to that one preparation than to anything 
else. Tlie methods of administering medicines 
were almost revolutionized by the pioneer in- 
vestigations of Colonel Lilly. No one did so 
much to perfect and introduce the capsule and 
the tablet for removing the disagreeable fea- 
tures of taking medicines. 

His labors in behalf of the material and 
civic improvement of his home city were such 
as to guarantee him a lasting place among the 
great citizens and builders of Indianapolis. 
His ideals of wealth were high, and after he 
had founded a solid fortune he directed his 
efforts and his means to the welfare of city and 
citizens. 

One of the first public enterprises in which 
he took a prominent part was the creation of 
the Consumers Gas Trust, about the time of 
the great natural gas discoveries in Indiana. 
He made the first subscrintion and pushed the 
matter to success. He was at the head of the 



HISTOEY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



693 



committee for securing gas territory, and his 
forethought and executive tact were largely 
TL^sponsible for the large arga from which thj 
Consumers Company drew its supply. 

The natural gas epoch was one of unex- 
ampled prosperity in the various sections of 
Indiana affected by the discoveries, and Col- 
onel Lilly was one of those who foresaw and 
sought to utilize to the greatest possibilities 
this prosperity for the permanent benefit of 
Indianapolis. To improve the city and pre- 
pare the way for its growtli to a modern 
metropolis, he became one of the foremost 
among a group of public-spirited citizens who 
may })roperly be credited with instituting the 
modern era of Indianapolis. 

The first work was the improvement of the 
streets and the construction of a scientific sys- 
tem of drainage. The plan was laid before 
the Board of Trade, of which he was then 
an oflficer, but that body was not competent 
to undertake so much civic responsibility and 
refused to take action. The plan involved the 
securing of a new city charter and also a long 
:ind persistent campaign in carrying out its 
details. The result was that Colonel Lilly and 
liis a— oeiates organized the Commercial Club, 
in 18ii0, and the history of that organization 
tell> the ultimate success of the plans for city 
building. Colonel Lilly was the first presi- 
dent of the club, and he was both an orig- 
inator of methods and an executive in secur- 
ing practical results. At the beginning there 
was not a mile of paved street in the city, 
and no system of drainage, and the present 
conditions in this respect have been brought 
about since the Commercial Club took hold 
of the work twenty years ago. It was due to 
Colonel Lilly's forethought that the Commer- 
cial Club erected its building and thus became 
a permanent organization for the city's wel- 
fare. 

(,'olonel Lilly was general director in mak- 
ing the arrangements for the national en- 
rainpnient of the Grand Army at Indianapolis 
in 1803. The successful issue of that encamp- 
ment, in the face of the difficulties of a panic 
vear, the liberal entertainment of the guests 
but without the usual deficit in the treasury 
of the management, are among the achiev- 
ments of the city for which a due amount of 
credit must be given Colonel Lilly. 

He was a liberal contributor to every charit- 
able enterprise from the time he became a 
nian of means. Several years prior to his 
death, he and his wife established tlie Eleanor 
Hospital in remembrance of an only daughter 
"lio died in childhood. Both public and pri- 
v.-itf chiirities benefited by his generous but 
'iiinstontatious jrifts. 



He was an active member of the George H. 
Thomas Post, G. A. E., and of the Indiana 
Division of the Loyal Legion. Also a member 
of the Commercial Club, the Columbia Club, 
and' Christ Episcopal Church. After the Civil 
War, on national issues, he was a Republican, 
l>ut somewhat independent in local politics. 
He never took active part in party affairs and 
declined numerous offers of political prefer- 
ment. 

In ISfiO, at Greencastle, Colonel Lilly mar- 
ried Miss Emily Lemon. She took the pride 
of a wife in his military career, but died in 
18(io during his unfortunate experience as a 
cotton planter in Mississippi. Josiah K. Lillv 
was the only child of this marriage. Colonel 
Lilly married, in 1869, Mariah C. Sloane, who 
is still living. The only child, a daughter, by 
this marriage, died in childhood. 

JosiAii K. Lilly, president of the Eli Lilly 
Company, is a son and the only child of the 
late Colonel Eli Lilly. He was born at Green- 
castle, Indiana, November 18, 1861, and was 
twelve years old when the family home was 
permanently established in Indianapolis. 

xVfter a common-school education he entered 
his father's business. Then, in order to equip 
himself for his business specialty, which re- 
quires professional as well as busineES training, 
he attended the Philadelphia College of Phar- 
macy. After his. graduation in 1382, he be- 
came superintendent of the Lilly laboratories, 
and upon the death of his father succeeded to 
the presidency of the company. 

]\rr. T^illy continues the public-spirited ac- 
tivity of his honored father. He has been 
identified with public movements of recent 
voars, most conspicuouslv in connection with 
the building of the splendid Y. M. C. A. 
home at the corner of North Illinois and West 
New York streets. He was president of the 
-Vssociation during its recent campaign in 
raising a quarter of a million dollars for the 
erection of this structure. He is still a direc- 
tor of the Association. He is also a member 
of tlic Commercial, Columbia and Country 
clubs, and of Christ Episcopal Church. 

He was married at Lexington, Kentucky, in 
1S82, to :Miss Lilly M. Ridgely of that city. 
Their two children are named Eli and Josiah. 

Judge Jaiies A. Pkitchard has been a rep- 
resentative nien)l)er of the Indianapolis bar for 
nearly two score of years and is now presiding 
with marked ability on the bench of the Clarion 
County criminal court. To the practice of 
his chosen profession he has l)rouglit a broad 
and accurate knowledge of the science of Juris- 
prudence and ready power of applying the same 
a« an advocate and counsellor, so that his suc- 
cess as n practitiiiner during tlie many year> of 



694 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



Dctive work prior to his elevation to the bench 
(v-as of the most unequivocal type, giving him 
prestige as one of the strong and versatile 
members of the bar of his native state. On 
the bench he has given ample manifestation of 
his judicial acumen and his rulings and de- 
cisions have been fair and equitable, ever con- 
serving the cause of justice. As a legist and 
jurist he has ably aided in maintaining the 
high standard of his profession in Indiana, and 
his position well entitles him to specific con- 
sideration in this publication. 

James Ambrose Pritchard was born in Fair- 
view, Fayette County, Indiana, on the 25th of 
October, 1846, and is a son of Rev. Henry R. 
and Emeline (Birdsell) Pritchard, the former 
of whom was born in Bourbon Coujity, Ken- 
tucky, a scion of one of the honored pioneer 
families of the old Bluegrass state, and the lat- 
ter of whom was a native of Butler County, 
Ohio, where her parents settled in the pioneer 
days. Rev. Henry R. Pritchard came to In- 
diana when a young man and for sixty-five 
years he labored with all of consecrated zeal 
and devotion as a clergyman of the Christian 
Church. He also became the owner of a good 
farm, to the management of which he gave his 
personal attention, and on the old homestead, 
in Bartholomew County, the son, of this re- 
view, passed his boyhood days. The father was 
a man of fine mental equipment and unassum- 
ing nobility of character, so that his influence 
was ever exerted beneficently in the aiding and 
uplifting of his fellowmen. He passed the 
closing years of his life in Indianapolis, where 
he died at the venerable age of eighty-one years. 
His cherished and devoted wife, a woman of 
gentle and gracious personality, was summoned 
to the life eternal at the age of eighty-two 
years. Of their four children all are now 
living. 

Judge James A. Pritchard, as already stated, 
passed his boyhood days on the farm, and when 
he was eight years of age his parents took up 
their residence in the village of Columbus, 
where he received the advantages of the pub- 
lic schools, after which he prosecuted his aca- 
demic studies for three years in Miami Uni- 
versity. After leaving college, in 1867, Judge 
Pritchard began reading law under the able 
preceptorship of Herod & Herod, of Columbus, 
Indiana, and he was admitted to the bar of 
his native commonwealth in 1873. 

In 1873, when in his twenty-seventh year, 
Judge Pritchard came to Indianapolis and en- 
gaged in the practice of his chosen profes- 
sion, and through his ability, energy and devo- 
tion to his work he soon srained a definite stand- 
ing at the local bar, wliile the passing years 
were marked by cumulative success and prece- 



dence in his profession, in connection with 
which he eventually retained a large and rep- 
resentative clientage and appeared in connec- 
tion with much important litigation in both 
the state and federal courts. He continued in 
the active practice of law until the 1st of Jan- 
uary, 1907, when he assumed his position as 
judge of tlie Clarion County criminal court, to 
which responsible and exacting office he had 
been elected in the preceding November, as 
candidate on the Republican ticket. In his 
regime on the bench he has amply justified the 
wisdom of those through whose suffrages the 
preferment came to him, and he has showTi dis- 
tinctive facility and high judicial acumen in 
the administration of the affairs of his impor- 
tant tribunal. He has ever been a stalwart 
advocate of the principles and policies for which 
the Republican party stands sponsor and has 
rendered efficient service in the cause, but he 
has never appeared as a candidate for public 
office save in the instance of his present incum- 
bency. 

Judge Pritchard is recognized as a loyal and 
broad-minded citizen and is fully appreciative 
of the advantages and manifold attractions of 
his home city, where he is held in unqualified 
popular esteem. He and his wife hold member- 
ship in the Christian Church, and he is affiliat- 
ed with Oriental Lodge No. 319, Free & Ac- 
cepted Masons, and Centennial Lodge No. 520, 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, in which 
latter order he is also identified with the En- 
campment of the Patriarchs Militant. He 
holds membership in the Marion Club, one of 
the representative social organizations of the 
capital city. 

On the 20th of May, 1885, was solemnized 
the marriage of Judge Pritchard to Miss Lilly 
H. O'Hair, who was born in Laurel, Franklin 
County, Indiana, a daughter of the late James 
and Mary O'Hair, and the three children of 
this union are Walter, Marie and Irene. 

John E. Hollett. Among the attorneys of 
the younger generation who are upholding the 
prestige of the bar of the capital city of In- 
diana is Jolm E. Hollett, who for about twenty, 
years and until January, 1910, was a member 
of the well known and representative law firm 
of Ayres. Jones and Hollett. He is also dis- 
tinctively tlie arcliitect of his own advancement 
and creditable work, an example of the boys 
wlio have educated themselves and secured their 
own start in life. He was only a lad of four- 
teen when he began plaving in the theaters to 
secure the money for his schooling, and tlius 
he continued until liis scholastic training was 
completed. 

^[r. Hollett was born in the village of Ar- 
cadia, Hamilton County, Indiana, on the 19th 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



of April, 1874, and is a son of Byron P. and 
Elizabeth A. (DeVaney) Hollett. The father 
was bom in Hendricks County, this state, and 
is a son of John M. Hollett^ who was a native 
of Kentucky, a scion of an old and honored 
family, and who came with his parents to In- 
diana in the early pioneer days, being reared 
to manhood in Wayne County. He passed the 
residue of his life in Indiana,^ where he fol- 
lowed the vocation of farming, ' becoming one 
of the prosperous agriculturists and influential 
citizens of Hendricks County. Byron P. Hol- 
lett was reared and educated in the old Hoosier 
state, and here he has ever continued to main- 
tain his home. He has been successful as a 
business man, and was for a number of years 
prominently identified with manufacturing en- 
terprises, besides building up a successful busi- 
ness as a general merchant and buyer and ship- 
per of grain. He and his wife still reside in 
the village of Arcadia. He is a Democrat in 
his political views. Mrs. Hollett was bom in 
Hamilton County, Indiana, and is a daughter 
of John H. DeVaney, who came to this state 
from North Carolina. Of the children of By- 
ron P. and Elizabeth A. Hollett the subject of 
this review is the only one now living. 

In the public schools of his native village 
John E._Hollett secured his early educational 
disciplii.", and after completing the curriculum 
of the same he entered the Shortridge high 
school in Indianapolis and graduated. There- 
after he completed a two years' coiirse in But- 
ler College in that citv. Prior to completing 
his college course he had entered the law office 
of the firm of Ayres and Jones, and under the 
able preceptorship of its principals he took up 
the study of law, and with this firm he was 
connected as student and member for more 
than twenty years, and the association was 
marked by the most pleasing relations and by 
definite accomplishment in a professional way. 
In 1897 Mr. Hollett graduated in the Indiana 
Law School in Indianapolis, and in the same 
year he was admitted to the bar of his native 
state. He forthwith became associated in prac- 
tice with his former preceptors as a member of 
the firm, and this professional alliance was con- 
tinued under the title of Ayres, Jones and Hol- 
lett until January 1, 1910, when Mr. Hollett 
formed a partnership with Merle N. A. Walker, 
a former judge of the Probate Court of Marion 
County, and with whom he is now engaged in 
the practice of law. 

In politics Mr. Hollett is aligned as a stal- 
wart supporter of the cause of the Democratic 
party, and he was formerly president of the 
Indiana Democratic Club, one of the leading 
social-political organizations of Indianapolis. 
He is a member of the Commercial Club, of 



which he was president in 1908-1909 and a 
director for several years. Both he and his wife 
are communicants of the Protestant Episcopal 
Church and are members of the parish of St. 
Paul's Church. 

On the 26th of June, 1900, Mr. Hollett mar- 
ried Miss Katherine Moore Sullivan, a daugh- 
ter of the Hon. Thomas L. Sullivan, former 
mayor of the City of Indianapolis and a promi- 
nent and influential citizen. She is a great- 
granddaughter of Senator Oliver H. Smith and 
also of .Judge Sullivan of the Supreme Court 
of Indiana. The children of Mr. and Mrs. 
Hollett are: Thomas Sullivan Hollett and 
John Everett Hollett, Jr. 

Frederick H. Chetne. This vital, pro- 
gressive age is one that demands of men a dis- 
tinctive initiative power if they are to attain 
to success worthy the name, and in addition 
to this power is required self-reliance, determi- 
nation and consecutive application in the pur- 
suit of a definite purpose. All these attributes 
have been exemplified in the career of Freder- 
ick H. Cheyne, who has gained success and 
prestige in the business world and who is dis- 
tinctively the architect of his own fortunes. 
He is now president of the F. H. Cheyne Elec- 
tric Company, one of the leading concerns of its 
kind in Indiana, and he has been a resident of 
the capital city since 1892. Appreciative of the 
attractions and commercial advantages of In- 
dianapolis, he has here found it possible to gain 
a position as one of its representative business 
men of the younger generation, and he enjoys 
unmistakable personal popular esteem in the 
city which he has thus elected to make his home 
and the scene of his well directed endeavors. 

Mr. Cheyne was bom in the City of Toronto, 
Canada, on the 20th of June, 1865, and is a 
son of Luther and Mary (Switzer) Cheyne, 
both of whom were likewise bom and reared in 
the Dominion of Canada, whither the paternal 
ancestors, of Scotch-Irish lineage, came from 
County Tyrone, Ireland. The mother's an- 
cestors came from Holland to Ireland, and 
family tradition is to the effect that the line is 
traced back to French-Huguenot origin and that 
representatives of the name sought hospice and 
refuge in Ireland to escape the persecutions in- 
cidental to the revocation of the Edict of 
Nantes. During the youth of the subject of 
this review his father was engaged in farming, 
and both of his parents continued to reside in 
the Province of Ontario, Canada, until their 
death. 

Frederick H. Che}Tie passed his boyhood and 
youth on the home farm, about twenty miles 
west of Toronto, and in the public schools of 
the locality he secured his early educational dis- 
cipline, in the meanwhile contributing his 



HISTOKY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



quota to the work aud management of the 
farm. At the age of sixteen years he entered 
upon an apprenticeship at the trade of mill- 
wright, which he followed for some time, after 
which he had charge of the operation of a mill 
which his father had purchased, at Brampton, 
Ontario, where he remained about two 3-ears. 
In 1888, Mr. Cheyne went to Cincinnati, Ohio, 
where he assumed a position in the establish- 
ment of an experimental manufacturing con- 
cern, with which he remained about two years, 
at the expiration of which he entered the em- 
ploy of a company engaged in the manufactur- 
ing of electrical machinery and appliances, in 
the same city. In this connection he put forth 
ever)- effort to master the details and multi- 
farious scientific and practical principles of 
applied electricit}-, and by his close attention to 
business and his receptive mind he gained a 
thorough and comprehensive knowledge and be- 
came an expert mechanician and theorist in this 
important field, or, as it may well be termed, 
profes.-^ion. In 1892 [Mr. Chej-ne came to In- 
dianapolis for the purpose of installing the 
electrical plant in the large building now known 
as the Imperial Hotel, and this commission led 
to his making permanent location in this city. 
In view of the success which he has here at- 
tained it can well be imderstood that he has had 
no reason to regret the choice which he made 
at the time, and, further than this, it may also 
be said that the capital city has no more loyal 
and appreciative admirer than he, while he has 
implicit faith in the still further industrial 
and civic progress of "Greater Indianapolis." 

In 1894, Mr. Cheyne entered into partnership 
with C. W. Meikel and engaged in the elec- 
trical supply and contracting business, with 
headquarters at Xew York and Delaware 
streets, and later at 124 Xorth Pennsylvania 
street, where was built up a very successful 
enterprise. The partnership alliance continued 
until October, 1903, when Mr. Chej-ne pur- 
chased his partners interest and, securing the 
co-operation of others, he effected the organi- 
zation and incorporation of the F. H. Cheyne 
Electric Company, of which he has since been 
the executive head. The well equipped estab- 
lishment of the company is located at 115-17 
East Ohio street, and a large and representative 
business is controlled — one that is constantly 
increasing in scope and importance, owing to 
the effective service given and the able and pro- 
gressive administration on the part of the 
founder of the enterprise. The company does 
a general electrical engineering business and 
has handled many large contracts, and in con- 
nection with the contracting feature of the en- 
terprise electrical supplies and appliances are 
handled at both wholesale and retail. Mr. 



Cheyne is identified with three of the repre- 
sentative civic organizations of Indianapolis — 
the Commercial, the Marion aud the Columbia 
Clubs, Mannerchor Hall Society, aud is a mem- 
ber of the Knights of Pythias. In politics he 
supports the principles of the Republican party, 
having become a naturalized citizen about 1894. 
He and his wife are members of the Meridian 
Street Methodist Episcopal Church. 

On the 30th of April, 1895, Mr. Cheyne was 
united in marriage to Miss Emma Alberta 
Scott, daughter of Henry Scott, a representa- 
tive citizen of Browustown, Indiana, and they 
ha\e one son, Thomas L. The beautiful fam- 
ily home, erected by Mr. Cheyne, is located at 
52 C Woodruil place. West Drive, and is a cen- 
ter of generous hospitality, under the gracious 
supervision of Mrs. Cheyne. 

C'ASsiis C. Shiklev. One of the distinctive 
functions of this historical compilation is to 
give consideration to the bench and bar of the 
Indiana capital, aud marked for proper recog- 
nition on the roster of the representative attor- 
neys and couuselors at law in Indianapolis is 
Cassius C. Shirley. 

Mr. Shirley finds due satisfaction in revert- 
ing to the fine old Hoosier commonwealth as 
the place of. his nativity. He was born at Rus- 
siaville, Howard County, Indiana, on the 28th 
of ^^ovember, 1859, and is a son of Dr. D. J. 
and Waitsel (Seward) Shirley, the former of 
whom was born in Scott County, Kentucky, and 
the latter was a native of Ohio. Dr. Shirley 
was one of the pioneer physicians and surgeons 
of Howard County, where he was long engaged 
in the practice of his profession and where he 
ever maintained a secure hold upon popular 
confidence and esteem. Both he and his wife 
continued to reside in Howard County, where 
his death occurred in 1891, his wife still surviv- 
ing him and making her home in Howard 
County. 

When Cassius C. Shirley was a child of four 
years, his parents removed from Russiaville to 
Xew London, Howard County, aud in the lat- 
ter place he was reared to maturity. After 
completing the curriculum of the public schools, 
he took a short course in Asbury Universit\, 
now DePauw Universitj', at Greencastle, In- 
diana, and in 1879 he was matriculated in the 
law department of the celebrated L'niversity 
of Michigan, at Ann Arbor, in which institu- 
tion he was graduated in the spring of 1881, 
with the degree of Bachelor of Laws. Imme- 
diately after his graduation, Mr. Shirley located 
in the city of Kokomo, Indiana, where he was 
duly admitted to the bar of his native state 
and where he engaged in the practice of his 
chosen profession under most favorable condi-' 
tions, as he formed a partnership with Judge 




/^^ 




CASPER MAUS 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



697 



James O'Brien, with whom he continued to be 
associated in the work of his profession, under 
the firm name of O'Brien & Shirley, for a 
period of ten j-ears. Upon the dissolution of 
this alliance 'Sir. Shirley formed a professional 
partnership with J. C. Blacklidge, under the 
title of Blacklidge & Shirley, and he continued 
in the successful practice of his profession 
until 1906. He had gained a position of prior- 
ity as one of the leading members of the l)ar 
of Howard County and his reputation as a 
trial lawyer had far transcended local limita- 
tions, as he has appeared in connection with 
many important litigations in both the State 
and Federal Courts. 

Distinctly eligible for a broader held of (.'U- 
deavor and realizing opportunities afforded for 
successful professional work in the capital city 
of the state, Mr. Shirley removed to Indianap- 
olis in !May of 1906. Here he forthwith be- 
came a member of the law firm of ;\Iillcr, 
Shirley & ^Filler. The senior member of the 
firm is Hon. William H. H. :Millcr, who was 
attorney-general of the United States under 
the administration of President Harrison, and 
the third member of the firm is ^Ir. Miller's 
son, one of the able younger members of the 
bar of the state. 

In 1S82, Mr. Shirley was elected prosecuting 
attorney of the judicial circuit composed of 
Howard and Tipton counties, and he remained 
incumbent of this office for two years, within 
which he made an admirable record in the han- 
dling of many important cases brought for- 
ward in the name of the people of his circuit. 
In the autumn of 1884, he was chosen city at- 
torney of Kokomo, and he continued in tenure 
of this position for several years — which fact 
offers effective voucher of public appreciation 
of his services. As a dialectician and trial law- 
yer, Mr. Shirley has gained a foremost posi- 
tion and his success has been the direct result 
of the application of his natural and technical 
powers to the work of his exacting profession. 

While recognized a's a stalwart in the camp 
of the Republican party and as an effective 
worker in behalf of its cause, "Mr. Shirley has 
never sought or held public office except in the 
direct line of his profession. For a number of 
years he was a valued member of the Repub- 
lican state central committee, and in 1900 he 
was a delegate to the national convention of the 
party, in Chicago. He served as a member of 
the Indiana commission of the Louisiana Pur- 
chase Exposition, in St. Ijouis, and did much 
to promote the favorable representation of his 
native state in that notable exposition. In a 
fraternal way he is identified with Kokomo 
Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons, and also 
the Chapter of the Royal Arch Masons, both 



of whicliare Kokomo bodies of the' time-hon- 
•rcd fraternify. 

On the 14th of January, 188-5, Mr. Shirley 
was united in marriage to Miss Blanche Ivlum, 
a daughter of Hiram and Mary Klum, of 
Kokomo, this state, and the only child of this 
union is Mary, who remains at the parental 
!iome. 

Frank M.\us Fauvre. A representative 
business man and highly esteemed citizen of 
tntlianapolis, which has been his home from 
his boyhood days to the present time, is Frank 
M. Fauvre, who has contributed materially to 
the industrial and commercial advancement of 
tbc cajjital city, as did also his honored father, 
and whose capitalistic interests are varied and 
important. He is a scion of stanch French stock 
and both his paternal and maternal lines trace 
back to influential families of what is now the 
German province of Alsace-Lorraine, wrested 
from France in the Franco-Prussian war. 
The family name in the agnatic line is Maus, 
but in 1900, in accordance with an order issued 
by the Circuit Court of Marion County, the 
subject of this review added to the same the 
name of his paternal grandmother, so that his 
legal name is now Fauvre. 

Frank M. Fauvre was born in the town of 
New Alsace, Dearborn County, Indiana, on the 
24th of January, 18-51, and is a son of Casper 
and Magdalena (Dietrich) Maus. Casper 
Maus was born in Eberbach, near the city of 
iletz, in Lorraine, France, and his wife was 
born near the city of Kohlmer, in the adjoin- 
ing province of Alsace. He came to America 
in 183-5, and his wife came with her ]iareuts 
about two years later, their marriage having 
been solemnized in the city of Cincinnati. 
Casper Maus was a miller by trade, and the 
family name has been identified with this im- 
portant line of industry for many centuries. 
.Authentic data determine that an ancestor in 
the direct line erected a mill at Eberbach, 
Lorraine France, in the year 1550, and the 
property remained in possession of the family 
until its representatives left their native land 
to come to America. .Jacob Maus, father of 
Casper, was a gallant soldier under the great 
Napoleon and was wounded in the battle of 
Eckmuhl, from the effects of which injury he 
died, in the early '20s. His wife later joined 
her son Casper in America and she passed the 
closing years of her life in Indiana. 

Casper jlaus merits' recognition as having 
been one of the sterling pioneers of Dearborn 
Countv, Indiana, and he had the distinction 
of there erecting, in 1842, the first steam grist- 
mill in the eastern part of the state. He was 
a man of inflexible integrity and honor in all 
the relations of life and ever evinced the utmost 



698 



HISTORY OF GKEATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



loyalty to the land of his adoption. In 1863 
he rendered effectiTe service as enrolling officer 
for the drafting of soldiers for service in the 
Union armies, and in the same year his mill 
was destroyed by fire. It is practically an his- 
torical certainty that the property was burned 
by the organization which was known as the 
Knights of the Golden Circle and which was 
in sympathy with the Confederate cause, or, 
at least, radically opposed to drafting men for 
the Union service. In 186-i Casper Mans re- 
moved with his family to Indianapolis, where 
he continued to reside until his death, in 1876, 
at the age of sixty years. His wife survived 
liim by many years and was eighty-two yeai-s 
of age at thetiine of her death, which occurred 
in 1900. Casper Maus erected in Indianapolis 
the Maus brewery, and the same was operated 
by him until his death, after which the business 
was continued by members of the family until 
1889, when the property and business were sold. 
Since that time the family name has not been 
identified with that line of industry. Casper 
Maus was a man of much business acumen and 
of indefatigable energy, and he attained to a 
large measure of success through his own well 
directed efforts after coming as a stranger to 
a strange land. He was generous and hos- 
pitable, tolerant and kindly in his relations 
with his fellow men, and he left the heritage 
of a good name. His wife came with her 
father, Jacob Deitrich, to America about the 
vear 1837 and the family established their 
home in Cincinnati, Ohio, where she continued 
to reside until her marriage. Of the six sons 
and three daughters, only the one son, Frank 
M., of this review, and two of the daughters 
are now living. Two of the sons, Albert and 
Joseph, rendered valiant service in defense of 
the Union in the Civil War, having been num- 
bered among the early volunteers from Indiana. 
Frank Maus Fauvre was thirteen years of 
age at the time of the family removal from 
Dearborn County to Indianapolis, and in this 
citv he was reared to maturity and here has 
constantly maintained his home during the 
intervening years. He duly availed himself 
of the advantages of the public schools of the 
day, and in 1867 he was graduated in a local 
commercial college. He was thereafter asso- 
ciated with his fatlier in the brewer}- business 
until the death of the latter, after which he 
had the general management of the business 
until the same was sold, in 1889, as has already 
been stated in this context. Since that time 
Mr. Fauvre has been prominently identified 
with the manufacturing of artificial ice, in 
Indianapolis and other cities, and to his enter- 
prise is due the founding of a number of large 
and modem ice-manufacturing plants which 



give to the public tlie most effective service 
and insure in the same the utmost purity of 
product. He is aUo prominently concerned 
with coal-mining operations in various parts 
of Indiana and has accomplished much in 
connection with the promotion of public util- 
ities of important order. 

In 1902 Mr. Fauvre was associated with 
others in the purchase of the electric inter- 
urban line extending between Indianapolis and 
Greenfield, and the lines were thereafter ex- 
tended to New Castle and Dublin, this state. 
ifr.. Fauvre was a stockholder and executive 
officer of the company at the time these note- 
worthy improvements were made. He sold his 
interest in 1905, prior to which time he had 
ablv administered the affairs of the corporation, 
in the office of president. He is at the present 
time president of the Vigo Electric Company, 
of Terre Haute, Indiana, and a director of the 
People's Light & Heat Company, of Indian- 
apolis. In 1881, in connection with the busi- 
ness of the ^laus brewery, he built and placed 
in operation the first artificial-ice plant in 
the city of Indianapolis. 

^Ir. Fauvre is essentially a progressive and 
far-sighted business man, and his loyalty to his 
home city has been manifested n»t only in the 
ca]ntalistic and executive support he has given 
to enterprises that have conserved industrial 
and commercial advancement, but also in his 
ready co-operation in the promotion of measc 
ures and public enterprises projected for the 
general welfare of the community. He is a 
valued member of the Indianapolis Board of 
Trade and also of the Commercial and Uni- 
versity Clubs. He is affiliated with Veritas 
Lodge, No. 602, Free & Accepted Masons, and 
he and his wife are members of the Christian 
Science Church, to which they transferred their 
membership from the Plymouth Congregational 
Church of Indianapolis. 

In the year 1880, was solemnized the mar- 
riage of Mr. Fauvre, at that time !Mr. Maus, 
to iliss Lilian Scholl, of Indianapolis, and 
they have three sons and three daughters, 
namely: Lilian M., Madeleine M., Francis 
M.. Julian M., Irving M., and Elizabeth M., 
all of whom remain at the parental home ex- 
cept Lilian IM., who is now the wife of Mr. 
Arthur Vonnegut, of Indianapolis. 

John Sanders Duncan is a member of the 
oldest law firm of Indianapolis, and through his 
father represents the oldest and best traditions 
of the law and official affairs in Indianapolis 
and the County of Marion. 

His father was the late Robert B. Duncan, 
for several years a prominent official of Marion 
Count^^ He was born in Ontario Countv, 
New York, June 1.5. 1810. In his fourteenth 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



699 



year the family moved to Pike Township in 
Marion County, Indiana. About the same time 
Indianapolis was selected for the permanent 
capital of the state, and in 1827, having spent 
three years in clearing and developing his 
father's farm, Robert Boyles Duncan identified 
himself with the new town. Before his death, 
in ."March, 1897, he had witnessed the rise and 
development of one of America's great cities 
froni the capital town where he had begun his 
career seventy years before. For a number of 
years prior to his death he enjoyed the distinc- 
tion of being the oldest continuous resident of 
Indianapolis. 

On coming to Indianapolis, he bound him- 
self under a contract to Mr. James M. Ray, 
M'ho became county clerk of Marion County, 
witii Duncan as his deputy. In March, 1834, 
he was promoted by election from deputy to 
county clerk, and continued to hold that office 
.-ixteen consecutive years. Through practically 
ihe first quarter century of Marion County's 
existence he administered the ofiBce of county 
clerk. 

AVhen he retired from the office of county 
clerk, he became a member of the bar, and for 
many years thereafter engaged in practice as 
a probate lawyer. Early in life he was a Whig 
in politics, but became a Republican on the 
orpinization of that party. He was a plain, 
nn]irptentiou5 man, firm of conviction and di- 
rect in statement, and honored everywhere for 
liis strict probity and just dealing. He was 
competent as a public official, business man 
and lawyer, and public-spirited as a citizen. 

He was reared a Scotch Presbyterian, but his 
wife, who bnre the maiden name of Mary E. 
Sanders (a daughter of Dr. John H. Sanders, 
"f Indianapolis), was a member of the Chris- 
tian Church, which he attended with her. He 
-crved as a trustee of the Northwestern Chris- 
tian Universitv, now Butler College. He mar- 
ried :Miss Sanders in 1843. Their children 
were: John Sanders, Robert P.. Anna B. (de- 
ceased), and Nellie G. 

The Duncan family, originally Scotch, has 
resided in America over a hundred and fifty 
years, since Robert Duncan emigrated in 1754. 
He was born in Scotland in 1726 and married 
Agnes Singleton, also of Scotch parentage. 
Their first home was in Pennsylvania, where 
thnir son Robert Avas born, September 28. 1772, 
their other children being James and John and 
three daughters. Some years later the family 
home wa« moved to western New York, and in 
1S17 Robert Duncan, the second, settled near 
"Sandusky. Ohio. Robert (the second) had mar- 
ried Anna Boyle=. and their son Rnljert Boyles 
wa- ;<?ven rears old when taken to Ohio, and at 
the age of ten. in the spring of l.'«2n. the familv 



located at Connertown, Hamilton County (then 
a part of Marion County). 

John Sanders Duncan, son of the late Rob- 
ert B. Duncan, was born at Indianapolis, Jan- 
itary 11, 1846, and his happy boyhood and suc- 
cessful manhood have both been passed in this 
city. From the public schools he entered the 
Northwestern Christian University (now Butler 
College), and was graduated in 1865 with tlie 
degree of B. S. In 1867, he was graduated 
in the Howard Law School with the degree of 
LL. B. The day following his twenty-first 
birthday he was admitted to the bar, and in 
Noveinber, 1867, he was appointed prosecutor 
of the Criminal Court of Marion Count)-, and 
a year later was elected to that office. Since 
serving out the terms of one year by appoint- 
ment and two years by election, Mr. Duncan 
has neither sought nor accepted political office, 
but has made the practice of the law the absorb- 
ing activity of his life. However, he has al- 
ways been a stanch Republican. 

On June 15, 1877, he and Charles W. Smith 
formed a legal partnership. The firm has con- 
tinued unbroken for thirty-three years, and be- 
sides being the oldest law firm in the city, it is 
a matter of additional interest that its offices 
have always remained the same, at 128 East 
Washington street. 

In 1864, when eigliteen years old, he enlisted 
as a private in the One Hundred and Thirty- 
second Indiana Infantry, in the-h.undred days' 
service, and received an honorable discharge at 
its close. He is a member of George H. 
Thomas Post No. 17, G. A. R., and of the Cen- 
tral Christian Church of Indianapolis. 

In 1867, Mr. Duncan married Miss Esther 
Wallace, a daugliter of William Wallace. She 
died in 1892. Mr. Duncan married, in 1897, 
Mrs. Perlie Haines, of Richmond, Indiana. 

JoHX J. Cooi'ER. The life record of the late 
John J. Cooper, of Indianapolis, constitutes the 
most worthy and significant monument to his 
memory. For many years he wielded large 
and beneficent infiuence in public affairs in the 
state; he was concerned with important busi- 
ness and industrial enterprises which conserved 
the progress and material prosperity of the com- 
munity : he -erved with distinction as treas- 
urer of the State of Indiana: and in all the 
relations of life he exemplified the highest 
principles of honor and integrity, thereby gain- 
ing and retaining the inviolable confidence and 
esteem of his fellow men. He was largely 
self-educated and was a man of broad mental 
ken and distinct individuality — one well 
equipped for leadersliip in thought and action. 
His character and his accomplishments were 
such tliat his name merits a place on the roll 
of the distinguished native sons of tlic Honsier 



~00 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



L-onmiouwualtli, wlicre he held prestige as :i 
t^eion of an honored pioneer family. He was 
long one of the prominent and influential citi- 
zens of the capital city, where he continued to 
reside until his death, which occurred on the 
ISth of January, 1906. 

John J. Cooper was born on a fanu in Ripley 
County, Indiana, on the 20th of January, 1830, 
and was a son of James and Virginia Cooper, 
the former of whom was a native of Virginia 
and of English lineage, and the latter of whom 
was born in Ohio, a member of one of the 
sterling pioneer families of the Buckeye com- 
monwealth, and one HthdsG' agnatic ' ancestral 
line is tr/iced'tack to French origin. James 
C'ooper was married in Ohio, whence he immi- 
grated to Indiana in the second decade of the 
nineteenth century, becoming one of the early 
settlers of Ripley County, where he became the 
owner of a large tract of land, a considerable 
]iortion of which he reclaimed from the virgin 
foicst, liesides which he built and operated a 
saw mill and a grist mill. He was one of the 
influential pioneers of that county and there 
lioth he and his wife continued to reside ixntil 
their death. 

Owing to the conditions and exigencies of 
time and place the subject of this memoir re- 
ceived in his youth only such advantages as 
were afl'orded in the pioneer schools of Riplcv 
County, but to such valiant souls advancement 
is certain, no matter what the handicap. Under 
the direction of that wisest of all head-masters, 
experience, he gained a broad and exact fund 
of knowledge, and his alert mentality and es- 
sential appreciation led him to read and study 
along effective lines, so that his intellectual 
powers were of high order, as was his judgment 
made mature and his poise secure through his 
long and active association with men and af- 
fairs. 

WTien twenty-one years of age Mr. Cooper 
established a general store at Zenas, Jennings 
County, Indiana, where he remained until 1858, 
when he removed to Kokomo, this state, where 
he engaged in the livery business and also built 
up a most successful enterprise as a dealer Iti 
horses and mules. During the Civil War he 
purchased and sold to the goTcmment thou- 
sands of horses and mules, and through his op- 
erations in this period he realized substantial 
financial returns. In 1864, Mr. Cooper re- 
moved from Kokomo to Indianapolis, where 
he continued to deal in stock upon a large 
scale, in connection with fanning. Ho became 
the owner of a farm of 750 acres a few miles 
northwest of the citv, and developed the same 
into one of the most valuable properties of the 
kind in the state. To the supervision of this 
farm he continued to give his personal atten- 



tion until his death, and the property is still 
owned by his family, except 250 acre-, which 
now forms a part of l>eautiful Riverside Park. 

In the domain of practical politics ^Ir. 
Cooper wieltied a large influence for many 
years, and as a contemporary of Hendricks, 
Vorhees, McDonald, Gray and other leaders of 
the Democratic party in Indiana, he was prom- 
inent and influential in the party councils and 
assisted ably in the effective manoeuvering of 
]iolitical forces in his native state. In 1882, he 
was elected to the ofl^cc of state treasurer, as 
the regular candidate on the Democratic ticket, 
and in 1884, a mark of popular appreciation 
and confidence was further given, in his being 
cliosen as his own successor. A thorough busi- 
ness man and one of much executive ability, 
he administered the fiscal affairs of the state 
with consummate wisdom and discretion, and 
his record in this responsible office has passed 
into historv as one of the best in the annals 
of the state. As a leader in legitimate political 
contests he had few superiors in Indiana and 
he ever brought his splendid powers to bear in 
forwarding the interests of the people and the 
development and upbuilding of his home citv, 
in whose welfare his loval interest never flagged. 

In his later years Mr. Cooper became promi- 
nently identified with the promotion and de- 
velopment of electric interurban raihvays, and 
in this important field of enterprise he was one 
of the pioneers in Indiana, which state now 
holds in this line practical precedence of all 
others in the Union. He was a member of 
the directorate of the Indianapolis, Greenfield 
& Eastern Electric Railway Company and also 
of the Indianapolis, Shelb^•A'ille & Southeastern 
Traction Company, besides which he was a 
stockholder in various other companies of like 
order. In 1SS6 he was one of the organizers and 
incorporators of the United States Encaustic 
Tile Works, of Indianapolis, representing one 
of the most e:^ensive industries of its kind in 
the Union, and he served as president of this 
corporation from the time of its inception until 
Ills death. 

As a citizen Mr. Cooper was essentiallv pro 
gressive. loyal and public-spirited, and all legit- 
imate measures and. enterprises tending to con- 
serve the welfare and advancement of the cap- 
ital citv were certain to receive the benefit of 
his infliience and tangible co-operation. Sin- 
cerity and probity dwelt with him as constant 
guests, and upon his entire career there rests 
no shadow of wrong or injustice. He was en- 
tirely free from ostentation, was a keen judge 
of men and, understandinsr the well-springs of 
human thought and motive, he was tolerant 
in bis judgment. Thus placing true values 
upon men and affairs, his helpfulness was man- 



HISTORY OF GKEATER IXDIAXAPOLIS. 



701 



ifesteil in wise ami legitimate ways, and hu 
uiaile his forceful and noble pei>i)iiaiity count 
for good in all the relations of life. He was 
a blaster ;\[a,son, and held membership in the 
Indianapolis Board of Trade and the Commer- 
cial Club. He passed to his reward, secure in 
tlie esteem of all who had appreciation of his 
true worth of character and of his large and 
generous accomplishment as one of the world's 
noble army of workers. 

On June 24, 1852, was solemnized the mar- 
riage of Mr. Cooper to Miss Sarah F. flyers, 
who was born in Dearborn and reared in Ripley 
County, Indiana, where her father, James fly- 
ers, was an early settler. Mrs. Cooper sur- 
vives her honored husband and still resides in 
the beautiful old liomestead in Indianapolis. 
Slie is a member of the Tabernacle Presby- 
terian Church, as is also the family. Of their 
eight children only three are now living — 
Charles M., of whom individual mention ia 
made on other pages of this publication; Yir- 
ginia E., who is the wife of Hon. John M. 
Wiley, of BufEalo, Xew York, and ex-member 
of Congress from that state; and Caroline C, 
who is the wife of Earl M. Ogle, of Indianap- 
olis. 

Charles il. Cooper. An able member of 
the bar of the state, Charles M. Cooper gave 
Ills attention to the work of his profession in 
the City of Indianapolis for a long term of 
years, but his various industrial and capitalistic 
interests now place such exigent demands upon 
his time and attention that he has to a large 
degree withdra\\Ti from active practice at tlie 
bar. He is native of Indiana and a representa- 
tive of one o'i its sterling pioneer families, 
being a son of the late John J. Cooper, a dis- 
tinguished citizen to whom is dedicated a special 
memoir on other pages of this work, so that 
m the present connection further review of 
the family history is not essential. 

Charles M. Cooper was born in the village of 
Zenas, Ripley County, Indiana, on the 17th of 
January, 1855, and three years later his par- 
ents, removed to Kokomo ; after six years' resi- 
dence there, they moved to Indianapolis, where 
ne was reared to manhood and where he has 
maintained his home during the intervening 
years. He completed the curriculum of the 
jniblic schools of the capital city, including a 
eourse in the high school, and in 1877 he was 
graduated in Cornell University at Ithaca, 
Xew York, with the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts. Somewhat later he began reading law 
under the able preceptorship of the late and 
honored Judge Samuel H. Buskirk, former 
judge of the Supreme Court of Indianapolis, 
niv} in 1879 was admitted to the bar of his 
.lativ'^ state, amply fortified in a preliminary 



\\a\- for the •vurk ef the exacting vocation in 
whicli he was destined to attain to marked 
success and prestige. He forthwith engaged 
in the practice of his profession in Indiana]!- 
olis and for more than twenty years he was 
numbered among the active and representative 
practitioners in tlie citw where he held \ra\v- 
dence botli as an able and discriminating trial 
lawyer and as a well fortified and conservative 
counselor. He became associated witli liis 
father in various business enterprises and also 
extended his operations individually in tlie in- 
dustrial field, and with the expanding of these 
various interests in scope and importance lie 
found it expedient to give to the same his per- 
sonal supervision, with the result that he in 
large measure relinquished the work of his 
profession. He succeeded his father in the 
presidency of the Ignited States Encaustic Tile 
Comjiany. one of the large industrial concerns 
of Indianapolis and one of the most important 
of its kind in the T'liited States, and of this 
position he is now incumbent. Much of his 
time is deniiinded in connection with the ad- 
ministration of the affairs of this corporation, 
and lie also has other large and im]iortant capi- 
talistic interests in the city and state. In the 
liromotion of business enterprises of magnitude 
lie has contributed his quota to the upbuilding 
of the Greater Indianapolis, and no citizen has 
shown a more loyal and vital interest in all that 
tends to further its progress and material and 
civic prosperity. He is the only surviving win 
of his parents and is well upholding the pres- 
tige of the honored name which Iv^ liears. 

As a stanch advocate of the ])rinciples and 
]iolicies for which the Democratic jiarty generic- 
ally stands sponsor, 'Mr. Coo]ier has been an 
active worker in its ranks, though he has m-ver 
had aught of ambition for the honors or emolu- 
ments of ]iublic office. He is a member of the 
Indiana Democratic Club, and is also identified 
with the Indianapolis Board of Trade and the 
Commercial Club. In the Masonic fratcrnitv 
he has completed the circle of both the York 
and Scottish Rite bodies, in which latter he is 
identified with the Consistory, of the Valley of 
Indianapolis, in which ho has attained to the 
thirbi--second degree, besides which he has 
crossed the sands of the desert and been en- 
rolled as a member of Murat Temple of the An- 
cient Arabic Order of the Xobles of the Mystic 
Shrine. He is also affiliated with the local 
lodge of the Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks. He is a member of the St. Paul's 
Episcopal Church of Indianapolis. 

On the 10th of August, 1899, Mr. Cooper 
was united in marriage to Miss Nellie J. John- 
son, daughter of the late Dr. Thornton .\. 
Johnson, of Indianapolis, and their attractive 



ro2 



HISTORY OF GllEATEU IXDIA.XAPOLIS. 



hoiiie. at K.'JO Xortli ^Meridian street, is one in 
which is (lis))enserl a gracious hospitality, 
touching the bijst social life of the capital 
city. They have two children, Sarah Frances, 
boi-n September 5, 1900, and John J., born 
JiUy 11, 190G. 

Jruu? A. Lii-MCKE. The German-American 
element has long been one of the strongest 
forces in the bone and sinew of the Repub- 
lican pnrty in tJie middle west, and the late 
Capt. Julius A. Lemcke was long a popular 
and stalwart leader of the Indiana contingent. 
Twenty-seven years of his earlier life was spent 
in Evansville' as merchant, banker, Fremont 
compaigncr and pioneer Republican, and 
finallv as one of the most active men con- 
nected with the promotion of the boat interests 
of the Ohio River. In the latter capacity he 
not only acquired a considerable fortune and 
a high "standing as a business man, but ren- 
dered his country splendid service in the early 
part of the Civil War by patrolling the lower 
Ohio and cutting oflE Confederate supplies, as 
well as by the transportation of men and muni- 
tions of war for the Union armies. He was 
an efRcicnt official both of Evansville and Van- 
derburg Countv before he was called to In- 
dianapolis to become treasurer of Indiana and 
until his death, twenty-two years thereafter 
was a prominent and honored citizen of the 
capital. Captain Lemcke was a man who drew 
people to him because they admired him for 
what he had really accomplished and because 
of the attractive power which always abides 
with those who themselves have an honest af- 
fection for their fellows. Such lovable char- 
acters avoid much of the wear and tear of life 
which fall npon those who plow through the 
world by sheer .strength and uncompromising 
force. 

Captain Lemcke's enviable record commences 
with his birth in Hamburg, Germany, on the 
] 1th of September, 1832 ; is extended into his 
early boyhood by the death of his father and 
into the" period of his youth by his emigra- 
tion to the United States in the spring of 
184(5. An ocean voyage of three months on a 
sailing vessel brought the youth of fourteen to 
Xew Orleans, and a trip of several days, up the 
^lississippi and Ohio Rivers, brought him to 
to the farm of his matenial uncle, William L. 
Deubler, ten miles from Evansville on the New 
Harmony road. Tliere was no child in the 
household and the f(nir vears which the hardv 
German boy spent on this homestead were 
busy ones indeed, valuable to him chiefly as 
a season of ffood discipline: his wages were 
nothing the first three years and four dollars 
nionthiv. the last year. So he decided to trv 
a drygoods store in Evansville. In his quaint 



book of "Reminiscences"', published not long 
before his deatli, the captain gives a graphic 
sketch of the duties which had fallen to him. 
"It was not unnatural," he says, "that the 
childless couple I left behind should be loth to 
part with a handy boy, who, never idle, began 
at daybreak with milking the cows; before 
breakfast had fed the stock and chopped an 
armful of wood ; and who, during the day, 
when not at work in the field or the clearing, 
kept up repairs on the barn and farming im- 
plements of the place, patched the harness of 
the horses, half-soled the shoes of the family, 
did the hog killing at Christmas, pickled the 
hams and smoked them, made the sausage and 
souse, watched the ash hopper and boiled the 
soap, and, who, on Saturday nights, helped 
Aunt Hannah darn the stockings of the fam- 
ily." Not to mention assisting the old uncle in 
his prosperous country store, both in selling 
his goods and hauling country produce to 
Evansville for shipment to New Orleans. 

After working in the drygoods store, study- 
ing bookkeeping at night and clerking in a 
grain and grocery store for about a year, young 
Lemcke went to New Orleans as receiving clerk 
on a passenger steamer. On his return he was 
sent np Green River, Kentucky, to take charge 
of a country store, and in the winter of 1852 
he took charge of the railroad station of Kings 
Station, then the northern terminus of the 
Evansville and Terre Haute line. The station 
was in the forest and the agent, who was soon 
dispensed with, returned to Evansville and 
commenced to make cigars. Soon afterward he 
was back on the river as a steamboat clerk, 
and then for some time operated a country 
store, auctioneered and did various other 
things, a dozen miles from Mount Vernon, 
Posey Countv, Indiana. Another return to 
Evansville followed, with some experience in 
connection with the "wildcat" bank of the 
place, and in the autumn of 1856 the young 
German- American appeared as a vigorous cam- 
paigner for Fremont and the Republican 
party. He was elected city clerk of Evansville 
in 1858: next became a member of the whole- 
sole grocerv firm of Sorenson, Lemcke and 
Company, from which he emerged financially 
broken but in fair spirits: built a first-class 
hotel, of which the city was much in need, and 
before the outbreak of the war had become 
largely interested in several well equipped 
steamboats, having, bv general consent, fairly 
earned the title of Captain. In 1861 the 
I'nited States Government detailed him to 
lintrol the lower Ohio River, and before regular 
posts were established in the valley, he did 
good service in preventing the transportation 
of supplies across the lines to the Confederacy. 



HISTOKY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



703 



He also served with one of His boats under 
Generals Grant and Sheridan at Cairo and Pa- 
ducah, and carried away the first load of 
wounded Union soldiers from Fort Donelson. 
Still later he was in the militarj- service on 
the Ohio, Tennessee and Cumberland rivers, 
and in 1862, with Captain. Dexter, he organ- 
ized the first Evansville and Cairo line. In 
times of peace he served for ten years as a 
member of the Ohio River Commission, and, in 
all respects, during his day no man was more 
closely identified with the boat interests of the 
Ohio valley. In 187fi he was elected city treas- 
urer of Evansville; in 1880 became sherifE of 
the county for two terms and was a member 
of the city police board. He was cashier of 
the Merchants' National Bank of Evansville 
and became interested in a woolen factory, 
also in Evansville. 

In 1887, when Captain Lemcke commenced 
his first term as state treasurer, he moved to 
Indianapolis, which ever after was his home. 
He was re-elected in 1888 and continued in 
office until 1891. President Harrison after- 
ward offered him the United States treasurer- 
ship, which he declined, and not long there- 
after visited Europe for the second time (first 
trip in 1866). While in Germany he formed 
a warm attachment to the poet Bodenstedt, 
who died during his stay in the fatherland, 
and he was honored by appointment as one 
of his famous friend's pallbearers. During the 
later years of his life. Captain Lemcke devoted 
much time in writing an account of his Euro- 
pean travels and his "Reminiscences of an 
Indianian", developing a remarkable gift for, 
humorous and graphic narrative. Although 
the deceased belonged to no secret societies, he 
was an old member of the Columbia Club, 
ilaennerchor, German House, Indianapolis Lit- 
erary Club and the Indianapolis Art Associa- 
tion, and no one was ever more welcome to 
any circle which he chose to enter than Cap- 
tain Lemcke. His death occurred at his home 
on North Pennsylvania street, the direct cause 
of his demise being pneumonia. He was buried 
in Evansville beside his eldest son, George, 
who had died ten vears before. The surviving 
members of his family are his widow, to whom 
he was married January 1, 1874; two daugh- 
ters, Mrs. Harn- Sloan Hicks, of New York 
City, and Eleanor, now tlie wife of Russell 
Fortune, of Indianapolis: and Ralph A. 
Lemcke, who was associated with his father 
in the management of his property. Captain 
Lemcke built the present handsome office build- 
ing, now knoT^m as the Lemcke Building, 
which was commenced in the spring of 18f).i. 

Charles E. Coffix. In the enlisting of 
men of enterprise, ability and integrity in the 



furtherance of lier financial, commercial and 
industrial activities, is mainly due the prece- 
dence and prosperity of Indiana's capital city, 
and as representative of the progressive spirit 
which has brought about the upbuilding of 
"Greater Indianapolis" it is consonant that in 
this publication special recognition be accorded 
to Charles E. Coffin, president of The Central 
Trust Company, which has been jjrominent in 
its sphere of operations in our favored com- 
monwealth. 

Mr. Coffin finds a due measure of satisfac- 
tion in reverting to the fine old Hoosier state 
as the place of his nativity. He was born at 
Salem, Washington County, Indiana, on the 
13th of July, 1849, and is a son of Zachariah 
T. and Caroline (Armfield) Coffin, who re- 
moved from Salem to Bloomington, this state, 
in 1862. There they passed the residue of their 
lives, honored by all who knew them. The 
father was a tanner and justice of the peace. 

Charles E. Coffin secured his rudimentary 
education in the schools of his native village 
and thereafter continued his studies in the pub- 
lic schools of Bloomington. where he was reared 
to maturity. In 1869, when twenty years of 
age, Mr. Coffin came to Indianapolis, where he 
assumed a position in the employ of Wylie & 
Martin, leading real estate dealers. He re- 
mained with this firm for a period of six years, 
at the expiration of which he established him- 
self independently in the same line of business, 
in which his operations eventually attained 
large proportions. He built up a most success- 
ful enterprise and incidentallv did much to 
further the material upbuilding of Indianapolis 
through the handling of both business and resi- 
dence properties and the opening of suburban 
subdivisions. He continued to be actively en- 
gaged in the real estate business until 1899, 
when he effected the organization of The Cen- 
tral Trust Company, of which he has since 
been president and which, under his able ad- 
ministration as chief executive, has become one 
of the strongest financial and fiduciarv institu- 
tions of its kind in the state. Mr. Coffin was 
also one of the organizers of the Indianapolis & 
Eastern Railroad Company, in which he wa,s 
one of the original stockholders and of which 
he served as vice-president for a number of 
years. He is a valued member of the Indian- 
apolis Board of Trade, of whose board of gov- 
ernors he was a member for one term. He was 
one of the organizers and incorporators of the 
Commercial Club and was its president in 
1900. He was one of the incorporators of the 
County Club and a member of its directorate, 
and is a director of the Art Association of 
Indianapolis, which controls the Heron .\rt In- 
stitute. For the past eleven years he has been 



?04 



HISTORY OF GKEATEK INDIANAPOLIS. 



a member of the city board of park commis- 
sioners, and at the present time is "tlie senior 
member in service in this important municipal 
body. 

From the foregoing statements, brief as they 
arc, it will be seen that Mr. Coffin is animated 
by broad public spirit and civic loyalty and 
thiit he has touched the various activities which 
juake for advancement and prosperity and con- 
serve consecutive progress in the beautiful 
capital city of Indiana. He was one of the 
charter members of the Columbia Club and 
is a member of the Marion Club, both repre- 
sentative social organizations of Indianapolis, 
nnd he takes deep interest in the affairs of the 
Indiana Historical Society, of which he is 
treasurer. In politics, though never animated 
by aught of ambition for official preferment, 
y\r. Coffin gives a stanch allegiance to the Re- 
]jublican party, and his religious faith is thai 
of the ]\rethod!fL Episcopal Church. In the 
Afasonic fraternity he has attained to the thirty- 
second degree of the Ancient Accepted Scottish 
Rite and is also identified with its adjunct or- 
ganization, the Ancient Aralnc Order of the 
Xobles of the ^[ystic Shrine, in which he has 
affiliation in Murat Temple. 

Albeut J. Beveridgk. Through his own 
powers and labors has Hon. Albert J. Beveridge 
lifted himself to the plane of high achievement 
and distinguished r-erviee. and thongh it is im- 
]iossible in a publiratimi of this order to enter 
into details concerning liis career in its cntiretv, 
yet consistency demands that in a work touch- 
ing the liistorv of "Greater Indianapolis", the 
citv of his honu', a tribute be paid to this dis- 
tinguished Indiana representative in the I'nited 
States senate. In the very prime of strong and 
vigorous manhood, none can denv that he has 
made a lasting impress upon the history of 
liis time, and that still more brilliant accom- 
plishment shall be his is but a logical sequence. 
A fignre of prominence in national affairs, a 
lawyer of marked abilitv, a man of fine in- 
tellectual, oratorical and literarv powers, h^^ 
has made his influence fell in divers directions 
•md has empbaticallv honored the state that has 
Jio'iored him in conferrins upon him the dig- 
nified office of which be is now incnmbent. 

M the time of his diction to the T'nited 
States senate, in ISflf). Albert J. Beveridge was 
one of the youngest men ever called to tint 
.ri'oot del'bnrntive bodv of o'lr national len^is- 
latnre. Here he has not failed to sunnort his 
initial brilliancy with a record of nraet'cal and 
cfFortive statesmanship. One especially familia'- 
with the career of Senator B°verid<re has nffpred 
the follnwinsr pertinent and apnr'^ciative esti- 
mnto: "Retninine t^e resnect and admiration 
of his confrere? at the bar and of those promi- 



nent in public life, he is by them recognized 
as an eloquent orator and at the same time he 
has evinced — in the halls of the United States 
senate and through the newspaper press, peri- 
odical literature and individual authorship — a 
solidity of mental equipment that has given 
his reputation the quality of endurance as well 
as that of elasticity. This stability of power, 
with consequent and normal expansion thereof, 
was denied him by the dictums of opposing 
political prophets, in the earlier period of his 
public career. To those familiar with the cir- 
cumstances that compassed him during his 
youth and early manhood there must come a 
feeling of respect and admiration, for he has 
unmistakably risen on the ladder of /his own 
building and merits that proudest of American 
titles, 'self-made man'." 

Senator Beveridge was born on a farm on 
the borders of Adams and Highland Counties, 
Ohio, on the Gth of October; 18(52, the old 
homestead residence having been located in 
Highland County.. His father had entered the 
Union service at the inception of the Civil 
War, and upon his return to his neglected farm, 
soon after the birth of Albert J., the veteran 
soldier found himself facing serious financial 
prol)lems, and soon after the close of the war 
he removed to Sullivan, Moultrie Countv, Illi- 
nois. In the rai^id fluctuation of values in the 
early post-bellum period he was unable to pro- 
tect his interests and suffered the loss of bis 
entire property. It was at this time that the 
family home was established in Illinois, where 
the father resumed agricultural operations un- 
der unfavorable circumstances. 

That the future United States senator was 
denied proper educational advantages in his 
boyhood days was the direct result of the de- 
pressing conditions that compassed the family 
fortunes. He attended the district schools of 
Moultrie County, Illinois, in a desultory wav, 
and at the ase of twelve years the boy was to 
be found following the plow. There was in 
his makeup, however, naught of apathy or stolid 
patience, and his alert mentality and definite 
ambition soon manifested themselves in de- 
termined effort for advancement through in- 
dividual endeavor. At the age of fourteen 
years he was employed as a laborer on a rail- 
road, and even then was he devising and for- 
mulating plans for the securing of an educa- 
tion far beyond the imperfect and irregular 
training thus far accorded him. In later davs 
than those of the youth of the mart>Ted and 
noble president, ,\braham Lincoln, have there 
been those who have wrought out their own 
salvation throush equally strenuous toil and 
endeavor, and there can be naught of incon- 
sistency in drawing measurable parallels. At 



HISTOKY OF GKEATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



T05 



lifteeu years of age Senator Beveridge was pro- 
viding for his Own maintenance tlirough his 
labors as a logger and teamster, and his leisure 
Iiours, oft times lent with grudging favor of 
the god of sleep, were given to study. Con- 
cerning his early struggles the following words 
have been written: "The deadlock in his hard 
aifairs was temporarily broken when he became 
a high-school student, but then, and for a 
number of years afterward, whatever he 
achieved mentally was a double triumph, for 
he was not only compelled to master the task 
in hand but also, by sheer force of will, to 
raise himself above all physical considerations 
most natural to the young man who is also 
valiantly struggling to provide himself with 
the absolute necessities of life." What of am- 
bition and determination belonged to the young 
student and worker 'need not be asked. He 
grappled with circumstance and bent it to his 
will. Under such conditions as have been desig- 
nated in foregoing sentences he also entered 
Asbury University, now DePauw University, 
at Greencastle, Indiana, in which institution 
he was graduated as a member of the class of 
ISS.J, with higli honors. He received his de- 
gree of Bachelor of Arts, but the baccalaureate 
lienors rented upon one who was virtually penni- 
less. After winning such intermediate vic- 
tories it was not to be expected that the young 
collegiate would flinch in tlie face of the fu- 
ture — a "foenuin worthy of his steel". There 
must have been to him at this point in his 
career much of that "stern joy that warriors 
feel"", and supine inactivity or rebellious protest 
found no hospice at his houseless door. 

After leaving the university Mr. Beveridge 
passed one year in the west, where he followed 
the untvammeled life of a cowboy, and he then 
returned to Indiana and took up his residence 
in Indianapolis, in the winter of ISSG. Here 
he began the study of law in the office of Sena- 
tor ^foDonald. But a vouiig man fresh frnm 
the westevn prairies can not well devote him- 
solf to such technical training without pro- 
viding for the assuagement of a vigorous and 
insistent pliysical a])iU't'te. Under these coii- 
ditioD" Si'uator Beveridge consulted ways and 
nionns for ])roviding for his support. While 
in colk'i.'e he had given evidence of the fine ora- 
torical lowers that have since gained to him 
wide repute and had given effective service as 
a cainiiaign speaker for the Kepublican party. 
His efforts in this direction may have Jiad in- 
fluence in gaining to him at this period of in- 
sistencv the position of reading clerk in the 
lower house of the Indiana legislature. Through 
his services in this caiiacity he earned enough 
to tide him over one year of his law studies. 
Uii-i"- tl^i- period he' continued his technical 



reading in the law oifice of McDonald & Butler, 
and appreciation of his ability and earnestness 
was tnen given by the firm, for which he be- 
came managing clerk, at a fair salary. He 
remained thus, associated with this firm until 
1889, when he was admitted to the bar, to 
which he came specially well fortified in exact 
and comprehensive knowledge of the science 
of jurisprudence. 

Immediately after his admission to the In- 
diana bar Senator Beveridge established him- 
self in the independent practice of his profes- 
sion in the capital city of the state, where he 
has- since maintained his home. From the 
initiation of his work in Indianapolis he gained 
strong supporters both in his. profession and in 
the ranks of the political party to which he 
gave his allegiance. Incidentally it should be 
noted that he early manifested a remarkable 
insight regarding constitutional questions. De- 
mands for his services as a campaign orator 
were insatiable. In the national campaign of 
189(5 he leaped into national fame by reason 
of his great speech, in Chicago, in answer to 
that of the late Governor Aitgeld, of Illinois, 
who spoke in JN'ew York City. Senator Bever- 
idge"s speech was one of the most powerful 
ever delivered by an American statesman as a 
masterly arraigJimeut of the socialistic ten- 
ilencies of the Democratic party and in the 
uttering of impressive warnings against the 
dangers of license and anarch}'. There can be 
no measure of doubt that this address, born of 
conviction and earnestness and graced by the 
most superb diction and oratory, had potent 
mtluenee m bringing its author forward as a 
candidate for the Lnited States senate and 
insuring his election, in 1899. His opponents 
in the nominating convention were four in 
number and were conceded to be among the 
ablest men in the state, but Senator Beveiidge. 
the youngest of the aspirants for the senatorial 
toga, gamed supporters who rallied valiantly 
to his standard, carrying the convention witii 
a dash and spirit almost unprecedented in the 
liistory of Kepublican politics in Indiana. Of 
his services in the federal senate it is not neces- 
tary to speak in this article, for they are known 
to all students of national affairs and ate a 
matter of record as well as of distinctive honor 
to the man. The senator was chosen as his 
own successor in the election of 1905, and his 
second term will expire in 1911. His course, 
marked by due independence and yet bv the 
strongest loyalty, has begotten a popular con- 
fidence that implies an impregnable hold upon 
public esteem and party fealty, and further 
honors shall not be' denied the gifted young 
stat.'snian who has won much and won it 
worthily. Energetic, sincere, studious, diiJlo- 



706 



HISTOKY OF GKEATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



matie, eloquent, strongly fortified in knowledge 
of constitutions questions and matters of 
national import, and thoroughly familiar with 
the demands, necessities and best interests of 
the people he represents — Albert J. Beveridge 
is to-day one of the progressive, loyal and able 
public officials _of our nation and is at the very 
zenith of his strong and \vorthy manhood. The 
country expects much of him, and it is his to 
give much. 

As a writer has Senator Beveridge also 
shown distinctive versatility and resourceful- 
ness, bringing to bear a tine literary apprecia- 
tion and great purity and amplitude of diction, 
and in addition to his many contributions to 
the newspaper press and to standard periodical 
literature he is the author also of the follow- 
ing named works: "The Russian Advance" 
(1903), "The Young Man and the World" 
(1905), "The Bible as Good Reading" (1908), 
"Meaning of the Times" (1908), "Work and 
Habits" (1908), "Americans of To-day and 
To-morrow" (1909). On the 24th of No- 
vember, 1887, Senator Beveridge was united in 
marriage to Miss Katherine Langsdale, of 
Greencastle, Indiana, and she was summoned 
to the life eternal on the 18th of June, 1900, 
leaving no children. In the City of Berlin, 
Germany, on the 7th of August, 1907, was 
solemnized the marriage of Senator Beveridge 
to Miss Catherine Spencer Eddy, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Augustus N. Eddy, of Chicago. 

Dr. Charles S. Goae. There is no man in 
the City of Indianapolis more widely known 
than Dr. Charles S. Goar, a physician and 
political worker of distinction. He traces his 
ancestry back on his paternal side through 
many generations to St. Goar, who was born 
near the River Rhine, Germany, and on his 
mother's side he is of English descent. He was 
born on his father's farm in Cicero Township, 
Tipton County, Indiana, August 17, 1865, a son 
of Henry and Martha E. (Smith) Goar, the 
former born in Monroe County, Virginia, No- 
vember 16, 1821, and died December 14, 1905, 
and the latter, born in Kentucky June 21, 
1828, died March 12, 1906. They were mar- 
ried in Henry County, Indiana, May 27, 1844, 
and thirteen children blessed their marriage 
union, but only six are now living, Charles S. 
being the eleventh born. The parents spent 
their days on the old homestead in Cicero 
Township, Tipton County, Indiana, he having 
pre-empted that land from the government dur- 
ing the presidency of James K. Polk, who 
signed the papers. In politics he was an in- 
dependent voter, lielieving firmly in the saying 
of Washington— "Don't forget your country 
for your politics." 

After a training in the district schools 



Charles S. Goar pursued a special scientific 
and teacher's course in the Central Normal 
College at Danville, Indiana, and graduated 
with the class of 1884. He then began the 
study of medicine under the instructions of 
Drs. Newcomer and Dickey of Danville, In- 
diana, and in the fall of 1885 matriculated in 
the College of Physicians and Surgeons of In- 
dianapolis, where he graduated with the class 
of 1888. Locating then at Kennedy, Minne- 
sota, he was in practice there until November 
of 1890, when he returned to Tipton, Indiana, 
and settled at Goldsmith. He was successful in 
his practice there and established a splendid 
reputation for professional skill, but leaving 
that city he came to Indianapolis in 1899. His 
fine ability as a medical practitioner is recog- 
nized by the profession, and he is often called 
into consultation both near and far. He is a 
member' of the County Medical Society, and of 
the State and American Medical Associations. 
Dr. Goar since his graduation from the Col- 
lege of Physicians and Surgeons has pursued 
post graduate courses in the clinics of New 
York City and in the Post Graduate School of 
Chicago. He is one of the lecturers in the In- 
diana School of Medicine, and during the past 
six years has been physician for the state 
school for the deaf. He is past noble grand 
of Goldsmith Lodge No. 324, I. 0. 0. F., and 
is a Thirty-second degree Mason. 

Dr. Goar has long been very popular in the 
ranks of the Republican party in central In- 
diana. In 1896 he was nominated and elected 
to the senate of Indiana, representing Tipton 
nnd Hamilton Counties, and during the session 
of 1897 he performed effective work in behalf 
of the people of his district, serving on a num- 
ber of important committees and was chairman 
of the committee on public health and vital 
statistics. His term continued during the ses- 
sion of 1899. He is a man of marked ability 
and worth, and gives his hearty co-operation 
and influence to all public measures having 
for their object the welfare of the community 
in which he lives and of the country at large. 
He married on March 8, 1891. Miss Jennie 
Hinkle. a daughter of L. D. and Mary Hinkle. 
of Goldsmith, Indiana, and a son, Churchill 
Goar, has been born to them. 

Joseph E. ^McDonald. A lawyer of exalted 
ability, a statesman of the highest type, and a 
man of sublimated integrity and honor, Hon. 
Joseph E. McDonald left a deep impress upon 
the history of Indiana and also upon that 
of the nation. Both were dignified bv his noble 
life and splendid achievements, and he stood as 
an honored member of a striking group of men 
whose influence in the social and economic life 
of the nation was of most beneficent order. 




O^ tU^c/. 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



He served as a member of both branches of 
the United States Congress and was accorded 
other evidences of popular confidence and re- 
gard, the while he ever ordered his course 
according to the highest principles and ideals, 
so that he was found true to himself and to 
all men. Such was his proiiiinence in public 
affairs and in professional life in Indiana and 
its capital city that it is but a matter of jus- 
tice to here enter a brief tribute to his memory 
and perpetuate at least a brief record concern- 
ing his career. 

Joseph Ewing McDonald was bom in Butler 
County, Ohio, on the 30th of August, 1819, 
and was a son of John and Eleanor (Piatt) 
McDonald. The father traced his lineage to 
stanch Scottish origin and the family was 
founded in America in the colonial days. John 
McDonald was a pioneer of the old Buckeye 
state and was known as a man of strong men- 
tality, impregnable integrity, and generous and 
kindly nature. He was industrious and dili- 
gent in connection with the practical affairs 
of life and manifested the business ability so 
characteristic of the sturdy race from which 
he was sprung. He died when the subject of 
thi^ ^memoir was an infant, and his widow sub- 
sequently became the wife of John Kerr, of 
Fairfiekl Township, Butler County, Ohio. She 
was of French-Huguenot ancestry and was a 
member of a family that was first founded in 
New Jersey, from which state representatives 
later made permanent settlement in Pennsyl- 
vania. From the latter commonwealth came 
the founders of the family in Ohio. Mrs. 
Eleanor (Piatt) McDonald Kerr was a woman 
of much talent and gracious personality, and 
her distinguished son ever gave credit to her 
for the beneficent influence she exerted in the 
formative period of his character. In the 
autumn of 1826, John Kerr removed with his 
family to Montgomery County, Indiana, where 
he secured a tract of government land and 
initiated the herculean task of reclaiming a 
farm from the forest wilds. He passed the 
closing years of his life in the home of his 
step-son, the subject of this memoir, in Craw- 
fordsville, Indiana, where he died in 1856. He 
and his wife were both devout members of the 
Presbyterian Church, as was also John McDon- 
ald, father of him whose name introduces this 
review. 

Joseph E. ilcDonald was significantly the 
artificer of his own fortunes, and he literally 
built the ladder upon which he rose to a place 
of distinction and great influence. He was 
seven years of age at the time of the family 
removal to Indiana, and he remained on the 
home farm until he had attained to the age 
of twelve years. He early began to contribute 
Vol. 11—5 



to the work of the pioneer farm and availed 
himself of the meager advantages att'ordod in 
the i^rimitive schools of the locality and period. 
For two years within this period he was en- 
abled to attend school at Crawfordsville, which 
was then a mere village. He was naturally re- 
ceptive and studious, and when not employed 
at work on the farm he passed the greater por- 
tion of his time in reading and study, the 
while he began to formulate his boyish dreams 
into actuating motives. He often stated in 
later years that when but ten years of age 
lie decided to prepare himself for the legal pro- 
fession, and this ambition must have been 
prompted more from his reading than from 
personal acquaintanceship with members of the 
profession. 

When twelve years of age Mr. McDonald 
entered upon an apprenticeship to the saddler's 
trade, at Lafayette, Indiana, and he continued 
to be identified with this line of work for six 
consecutive years, save for a period of three 
months spent in attending school. He had 
already become proficient in the common Eng- 
lish branches, and his fund of knowledge had 
been appreciably expanded through special ad- 
vantages afforded him during his term of ap- 
prenticeship. He was 'afforded access to the 
extensive and well selected library of Dr. 
Israel T. Ganby, of Crawfordsville, and he 
made the most of the opportunities thus j)re- 
sented. In 1838 Mr. McDonald was matricu- 
lated in Wabash College, at Crawfordsville, 
where he continued his higher academic studies 
until 1840, except for a short interval, in 1839, 
when he was employed with the state engineer- 
ing corps that was surveying the bed for the 
Wabash & Erie canal. In the meanwhile he 
had maintained himself in college largely by 
working at his trade during vacations and at 
such other times as opportunity was offered. 
In 1840 he entered Asbury (now DePauw) 
University, at Greencastle, where he continued 
his studies for six ninths, at the expiration of 
which he returned to Crawfordsville, where he 
was engaged in teaching school for one term. 
In the spring of 18 il Mr. McDonald went 
to Williamsport, this state, where he passed 
one year as clerk in the store of his elder 
brother. He had not in the meanwhile aban- 
doned his determination to enter the legal pro- 
fession and had waited only until such time as 
circumstances would justify his beginning the 
work of preparation therefor. In the spring 
of 1843 he began the study of law under the 
preceptorship of Zebulon Beard, of Crawfords- 
ville, who was then one of the leading nu'ni- 
liers of the bar of the state. Under such favor- 
able direction the young man made rapid prog- 
ress in his accumulation and assimilation of 



708 



HISTOEY OF GKEATER IxNDIAXAPOLlS. 



the science of jurisprudence, and in the spring 
of 1843 he was admitted to practice, after ex- 
amination before the Superior Court, consist- 
ing of Judges Blackford, Dewey and Sullivan. 
Prior to receiving his license to practice he was 
nominated on the Democratic ticket for the 
office of prosecuting attorney of Montgomery 
County, of which Crawfordsville is the judicial 
center, and in the election in August, 1843, he 
was successful at the polls, where he received 
a gratifying majority over his Whig opponent, 
Robert Jones, a prominent member of the bar 
of that county. Prior to this time the prose- 
cuting attorneys for the various counties had 
been selected by the legislature, and thus Mr. 
McDonald had the distinction of being the first 
prosecutor chosen by popular vote in Montgom- 
ery County. He made an excellent record as a 
public prosecutor and in August, 1845, he was 
chosen as his own successor, defeating Robert 
Evans, the Whig candidate. He thus continued 
incumbent of the office for four consecutive 
years. In the autumn of 1847, Mr. McDonald 
established himself in the private practice of 
his profession in Crawfordsville, where he thus 
contimTed until 1859. 

In the meantime Mr. McDonald had had 
shown his eligibility and power for leadership 
in political affairs and had become one of the 
vigorous and prominent exponents ^of the prin- 
cinles of the Democratic party in his section of 
the state. In 1849 he was elected to represent 
the Eighth district in Congress, and he served 
one term as a member of the lower house of 
the federal legislature. In 1856 there came 
further recognition of his professional talent 
and political popularity, in that he was elected 
attorney general of Indiana, an office in which 
he was the first to l)e chosen by popular vote. 
His record gained to him wider reputation and 
public endorsement, as was shown conclusively 
in his re-election two years later. In 1859 he 
established his home in Indianapolis, where 
ho entered into partnership with Judge Addi- 
son L. Roache, who had served on the bench 
of the Supreme Court of the state, and the 
firm of Roache & -McDonald forthwith assumed 
a place of distinctive ])riority at the bar of 
Indiana. It secured a large and representative 
clientage and appeared in connection with much 
important litigatio'n in the state and federal 
courts in Indianapolis. 

In 1864 Mr. McDonald received the nom- 
ination of his party for governor of tlie state, 
and he made a vigorous and effective campaign 
against no less distinguished and popular an 
antagonist than Hon. Oliver P. Morton, the 
war governor, with whom he made a joint can- 
vass of the stnto. Though he mot with defeat 
at the polls he received six thousand more 



votes than were polled for the Democratic stalt 
ticket at the preceding election. On the 5th 
of March, 1875, he took his seat in the United 
States senate, in which he was elected to suc- 
ceed Hon. Daniel D. Pratt. He assumed a 
position of prominence in the senate, by rea- 
son of his recognized ability and his recognized 
loyalty to his important constituency. He was 
made chairman of the committee on public 
laws and the second member of the important 
judiciary committee. He was known as one of 
the best informed and most versatile lawyers 
in the senate and his influence permeated in 
many directions. He was a member of the 
senate committee that visited the city of New 
Orleans to investigate the counting of the Lou- 
isiana vote in the election of 1876, and also 
of the Teller-Wallace committee that investi- 
gated election frauds in Massachusetts and 
Rhode Island. Mr. McDonald was chairman 
of the Democratic state convention of In- 
diana in 1868 and was a member of the state 
central committee of his party from 1868 to 
1874. He served one term in the United 
States senate and then opened a law office m 
the city of Washington, D. C. thereafter he 
divided his time between the national capital 
and Indianapolis, in which latter city he also 
continued to maintain an office until his death. 
In Washington he was engaged in connection 
with many important cases presented before the 
Supreme Court, and among the most notable 
of these were those in connection with the tele- 
phone patents and the Mormon affairs. During 
every state and national campaign for many 
years his services were in almost constant requi- 
sition in making speeches in support of the 
principles and policies of the party of which 
he was a recognized leader, and at the Demo- 
cratic national convention of 1880 he narrowly 
escaped being made the standard-bearer of the 
party on the presidential ticket. At one stage 
of the proceedings of the convention one of 
its sagacious delegates made the statement that 
the choice would either be the old ticket or 
Senator McDonald would be made the candi- 
date for the presidency. For reasons not nec- 
essary to mention, political exigencies and ex- 
pediency finally led to the nomination of Gen- 
eral Hancock. 

Mr. McDonald's health was excellent 
throughout his life until December, 1890, when 
th(> disorder that finally hrought about his 
death appeared in the form of a mild attack 
of indigestion. In April, 1891. he came from 
Washington to Indianapolis, whore he was des- 
tined to pass the residue of his long and use- 
ful life among the friends who had proved 
their loyalty and of whom he was deeply ap- 
preciative. For several weeks after his arrivnl 



HISTORY OF GKEATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



709 



he wa:^ able to ride to his office and there spend 
a few hours each day, but the visits gradually 
ij;Laine irregular and finally ceased altogether. 
Thereafter he remained at his home, an uncom- 
plaining sufferer, until the final summons came, 
on the 21st of June, 1891. 

ThroiTghout his long and earnest career Sen- 
ator' ^IcDonald was unswerving in his alle- 
giance to the exacting profession in which it was 
his to attain to so much of success and distinc- 
tion. His association with important cases in 
Indiana history was of the closest and his skill 
and learning in his profession made him one 
of the really great lawyers of the country. 
Various causes which he represented in Indiana 
attracted xmusual attention, and prominent 
among these was that of the State of Indiana 
versus Sidney Owens, charged with murder by 
poison. The prosecution was conducted by 
Judge Gregory, of Lafayette, and General Lew 
Wallace, of Crawfordsville, and there was a 
strong public prejudice against the defendant, 
whose interests were most ably represented by 
-Mr. JIcDonald, who secured a verdict of ac- 
quittal, to the surprise of the entire bar of 
the state. Mr. McDonald was also counsel for 
Bowles, Milligan and Harvey, who were tried 
for conspiracy and treason by a military com- 
mission and sentenced to be hanged. The case 
was taken to the Supreme Court of the United 
States and the defendants were released on 
constitutional grounds. Mr. McDonald also 
appeared as counsel for the defense in the 
noted Beebe case, in which the Federal Supreme 
Court decided that the Maine liquor law was 
unconstitutional. He was also one of the at- 
torneys for those who brought into the Su- 
preme Court the issue of the constitutionality 
of the Baxter liquor 'law. He presented the 
leading argument in many important .railroad 
cases tried in the federal courts and made the 
principal argument for the objectors in the 
count of the electoral vote of Louisiana before 
the electoral commission appointed to deter- 
mine the result of the presidential election of 
1876. He maintained that the creation of this 
commission was the exercise of a doubtful 
power, even in case of apparent necessity. 

In politics Mr. McDonald ever held closely 
to the basic principles of the Democratic party 
as exemplified by Jefferson and Jackson, and 
few had more power and versatility as cam- 
paign orators. As a speaker he was cool, log- 
ical and resourceful. He believed in the in- 
trinsic virtue of the people and in their ability 
and purpose to maintain our national institu- 
tions inviolate against the as.saults of design- 
ing politicians. Regarded by all parties as a 
statesman of great ability, broad and liljeral 
views, well fortified convictions and absolute 



personal integrity of purpose, long before the 
national convention of 1884 there was a gen- 
eral demand among the Democrats of Indiana 
for the nomination of Senator lilcDonald for 
the party candidate for the presidency. In 
presenting his name to the convention Hon. 
Thomas A. Hendricks referred to him as the 
peer of the best lawyers of the west, and con- 
tinued with the following words: "Faithfully, 
diligently and ably, for six years, he repre- 
sented Indiana in the senate, welcomed by the 
ablest of the senators as their peer. Mr. 
McDonald has been a student of the learning 
that has made the Democracy of the L'nited 
States what it is today. He is familiar with 
the writings of his fathers and his opinions are 
based upon the sentiments that came to him 
through their pages. He is of clear perception, 
strong judgment, fair and jiist." 

At the time of the death of Senator McDon- 
ald the Indianapolis Sentinel gave the follow- 
ing appreciative estimate in its editorial col- 
umns : "Kind of heart, colossal of mind, noble 
of purpose, strong of conviction and fearless of 
action, he put an indelible stamp upon the 
history of his time. In the laws of his state 
and of the nation he has left many enduring 
monuments to his worth. In the hearts of all 
who knew him he has left a lasting memory 
of his affection. In every sense he was one 
of nature's noblemen, and a nation will unite 
with that bereft family in mourning an end 
which, though coming when full of years and 
honors and ripe experience, our human iinder- 
standing can regard as but most untimely." 
Senator ]\rcDonald was devoted to his home 
and family and to those admitted to the more 
intimate circle of his acquaintanceship will 
remain the deepest appreciation of the intrinsic 
nobility of the man. He was scholarly in his 
tastes and inclinations and read widely and 
with deep appreciation the best in literature. 

On Christmas day of the year 1844 was sol- 
emnized the marriage of Senator McDonald 
to Miss Nancy Ruth Buell, a daughter of Dr. 
Buell, a leading physician of Williamsport, In- 
diana. The ■ children of this union were : 
Ezekiel M., Malcolm A., Frank B. and Annie. 
The daughter became the wife of a Mr. Cald- 
well and her death occurred on the 2d of June, 
1877; Ezekiel M. died June 1. 1873, after hav- 
ing been associated with his father in the prac- 
tice of law for five years ; Frank B. died in 
Washington, D. C, on the 7th of January, 
1887. Mrs. McDonald was summoned to the 
life eternal, and on the 3d of September. 1872. 
Senator McDonald married ]\[iss Araminta W. 
Vance, of Crawfordsville, this state, who died ' 
•February 2. 1875, leaving no children. 

While a member of the United States sen- 



710 



HISTOKY OF GEEATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



ate, Senator McDonald was united in marriage 
to Mrs. Josephine F. (Farnsworth) Barnaso 
of Indianapolis, who survives him and retains 
her residence in Indianapolis, where, now ven- 
erable in years, she is held in affectionate re- 
gard by all who have come within the circle 
of her gentle and gracious influence. She was 
born at Westfield, New York, and is a daugh- 
ter of the late Joseph Farnsworth, who was 
long numbered among the representative citi- 
zens of Madison, Indiana, he having been a 
native of the state of New York and having 
been a scion of a family, of English extrac- 
tion, that was founded in America in the 
colonial epoch. 

Antoine Wiegand. None has a more se- 
cure place in the confidence and esteem of the 
people of Indianapolis than has Antoine Wie- 
gand, an honored pioneer business man, who 
has here conducted operations as a florist for 
over half a century. He was the first to prop- 
erly and successfully exploit this attractive line 
of enterprise in the capital city, and his sales^ 
rooms and consen'atories are now of the finest 
modern type. He caters to a large and thor- 
oughly representative patronage and his name 
is familiar to all who have been residents of 
the city for an appreciable period. His love for 
the gracious floral products of nature is of the 
most insistent type, and thus his devotion to 
his business has had both a sentimental and 
practical valuation, for his constant interest 
has promoted that close attention which pro- 
motes the best results in a practical way, the 
while he has so ordered his aourse, which has 
been marked by never-failing aourtesy, that he 
has the affectionate regard of th« patrons whom 
he has long supplied with the finest of floricul- 
tural products. He has won success through 
his own efforts, having come from a far country 
to America when a young man and having re- 
lied solely upon his own ambitien, self-re- 
liance and sturdy integrity of purpose in mak- 
ing his way in the world. The business which he 
founded so many years ago is now conducted 
under the firm name of Wiegand & Sons, and 
he has as his associates in the same his two 
sons, who are numbered among the popular and 
representative younger business men of the 
capital city. 

Antoine Wiegand, better known by the Eng- 
lish form of his Christian name, Anthony, was 
born in the kingdom of Saxony, Germany, on 
the 25th of April, 1832, and iii. the fatherland 
he was reared and educated. There also he 
gained his initial training in the line of enter- 
prise to which he has devoted his attention with 
.so much of success throughout practically his 
entire business career, and in 18.')5. when 
twenty-two years of age, he severed the ties 



that bound him .to home and native land and 
set forth to seek his fortunes in America — a 
land to whose development and progress his 
countrymen have contributed in generous meas- 
ure. Soon after his arrival in the United 
States Mr. Wiegand came to Indianapolis, 
where, in 1859, he engaged in his present line 
of business, by establishing a modest green- 
house near the old district school building on 
Kentucky avenue. There he continued opera- 
tious, with ever increasing success, until 1879, 
when he removed to his present attractive and 
eligible location on Illinois street. His tVnely 
equipped hot-houses now cover an area of torty 
thousand square feet and are the largest and 
best in the entire state. His glass-covered con- 
servatories are most attractive and in the dis- 
playing of their beautiful products to his many 
patrons and the general public he finds a source 
of unqualified pleasure and satisfaction. In 
1908 he erected his fine display and sales room, 
one hundred by twenty-six feet in dimensions, 
glass covered and Avith cement floor, and here 
the beautiful and varied products of his con- 
servatories are presented in most attractive 
array. Mr. Wiegand conducted the business in- 
dividually until about 1900, when his two sons, 
George B. and Homer L., were admitted to 
partnership, under the firm name already noted. 

In the Wiegand establishment are to be 
found plants in greater variety and profusion 
than in any other one conservatory in the state, 
and through close study and careful attention 
Mr. Wiegand has been peculiarly successful in 
the propagation of rare species and special and 
original types, in which connection it may be 
noted that he has in stock certain single plants 
that are worth one hundred and fifty dollars 
each. A specialty is made of cut flowers and 
the concern also gives distinctive attention to 
the preparing and effective placing of interior 
floral decorations, so that recourse is had to 
the same on all important social occasions. The 
trade of the firm extends throughout the cities 
and towns in the vicinity of Indianapolis and 
is constantly expanding in scope and impor- 
tance. Mr. Wiegand was the pioneer in this 
line of business in the capital city. When he 
began operations here, fifty years ago, there 
was little demand for flowers aside from those 
grown in a private way, but through the dis- 
playing of his fine products he made them their 
own best advertisers, with the result that popu- 
lar appreciation and support were not denied. 

Thoroughly loyal to the institutions and 
ideals of his adopted country, Mr. Wiegand has 
shown an intelligent and constant interest in 
both national and local governmental affairs, 
and he is known as a liberal and public-spirited 
citizen. In national affairs, where definite 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



711 



issues are involved, he gives his support to the 
Republican party, but in local matters he does 
not adhere to close partisan lines, giving, rather, 
his support to men and measures meeting the 
approval of his judgment. He is a member of 
the Columbia Club, and is affiliated with the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the 
Royal Arcanum. He holds membership in the 
Tabernacle Chiirch. 

In 1865 Mr. Wiegand was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Katherine Kreiss, who was born 
in Germany, whence she came with her parents 
to America when a girl. Mr. and Mrs. Wie- 
gand have two sons and two daughters, namely: 
George B., Homer L., Annie and Bene. 

David M. Eluott. Nearly thirty years of 
consecutive identification with the postofBce 
service in Indianapolis represents- the ex- 
ceptional record of David M. Elliott, and it 
is doubtful if there is another man in the 
service as thoroughly familiar with the same 
as he is or possessed of more intimate knowl- 
edge of the city in the matter of postal rami- 
fication's. He has won advancement through 
able and faithful service and is now incum- 
bent of the dual office of finance clerk and 
second assistant postmaster. It is needless 
to say that he is an official of the most ster- 
ling characteristics and that he is held in 
high regard by all who know him, being one 
of the well Imown and popular executives 
identified with the local postal service. 

David McClure Elliott is a scion of one 
of the old and honored families of Indiana, 
of which state he is a native son. He was 
born on a farm in Monroe Township, JefPer- 
son County, this state, on the 2d of October, 
1849. and is a son of Anthony and Elizabeth 
(Craig") Elliott, both of whom were born in 
Ohio, where the respective families were 
founded in the pioneer days. Robert Elliott, 
the paternal grandfather of the subject of 
this review, was born in Rockbridge County, 
Virginia, on the 15th of September, 1784, 
and died in Jeflferson County, Indiana, June 
26, 1872. He came to Indiana soon after the 
close of the war of 1812, prior to the admis- 
sion of the state to the Union, having served 
as a valiant and loyal soldier in the second 
conflict with England. He became one of the 
early settlers of JetTerson County, where he 
established one of the first tanneries in the 
state, having been a tanner by trade. His 
mother's maiden name was Jennie McClure' 
and that of his wife Mary Logan, and their 
relatives have made the names McClure and 
Logan nrominent in the early history of Jef- 
ferson County and the City of Madison. An- 
thony Logan Elliott, the father of the subject 
of this sketch, was the eldest of a familv of 



six children, who all settled on farms in Jef- 
xcrson County, but he died in his prime, 
leaving a widow and seven children, of whom 
David, seven years old, was the youngest^ and 
so broken in health that his early death 
seemed certain. He is now, however, the only 
survivor, but has had to use crutches since 
childhood. The last of those six robust 
brothers and sisters passed away in 1903, the 
lives of the brothers no doubt being greatly 
shortened by soldiers' hardships during four 
years of the Civil War. David's poor health 
as a boy prevented any steady attendance at 
school but at the age of 20 he was teaching. 
His mother died before he reached his ma- 
jority. During the last few years of her 
life Mr. Elliott had a step-father, Rev. Wm. 
Wallace, of whom he speaks in the highest 
terms. Mr. Elliott spent a year or two of 
the early seventies in the south, teaching 
and doing bookkeeping in Alabama and 
speaks with some pride of the fact' that al- 
though but twenty-three years old he was 
inspector of his precinct in that state at 
Grant's second election in 1872. Returning 
later to Indiana, he served two terms as 
trustee of his native township, and in 1880 
was nominated for county recorder, but a de- 
cision of the supreme court having incident- 
ally deferred recorders' election for two 
years, Mr. Elliott came to Indianapolis in 
May, 1881, and took service under Postmaster 
Wildman (a relative), and has served contin- 
uously under nine postmasters, working his 
way up from the lower grades and reaching 
his present important position many years 
ago. 

Mr. Elliott is a stanch Republican and a 
member of the Marion Club, but has a host 
of friends in all parties. 

David McClure Elliott and Miss Martha 
Pressly were married in May, 1891, she being 
a native of Kosciusko County, Indiana, and 
the youngest daughter of Dr. Samuel Pressly, 
who was in his day a prominent physician of 
northern Indiana. Mr. and Mrs. Elliott have 
no children of their own, but their home is 
kept lively by numerous nieces and nephews, 
as Mr. Elliott has been guardian for several 
families of orphans. Their home is at 2241 
Talbott avenue, and both are active members 
of the First United Presbyterian Church. 

WiLLi.\M B. BuRFORD. Among the strong 
and. honored figures in the business circles of 
the beautiful capital city of Indiana is 
William B. Burford, who has here been 
closely identified with business and civic in- 
terests for more than forty years, so that he 
may well be designated at the present time as 
one of the pioneer business men of "Greater 



712 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



Indianapolis", to whose industrial and com- 
mercial advancement he has contributed his 
quota. He is a manufacturer of blank books, 
and his large and finely equipped establish- 
ment also has the best of modern facilities for 
lithographic work, general printing, copper- 
plate engraving, etc., besides which he han- 
dles all kinds of stationery and general office 
supplies. Through wise administrative pol- 
icy, close application, marked discrimination 
and impregnable integrity of purpose he has 
not only built up a large and important busi- 
ness enterprise, of metropolitan proportions, 
but has also maintained a most secure hold 
upon popular confidence and esteem in the 
city which has so long represented his home. 
Mr. Burford was born in the village of In- 
dependence, Jackson County, Missouri, on the 
18th of November, 1846, and is a son of Miles 
W. and N. J. (Burford) Burford, both of 
whom were born at Harrodsburg, Kentucky, 
representatives of old and honored families 
of that commonwealth and themselves dis- 
tantly related. They were reared and edu- 
cated in their native state and there their 
marriage was solemnized. In 1839 they re- 
moved to Independence, Missouri, and there 
the father of William B. became a prominent 
and influential citizen and leading business 
man. He was one of the early bankers of 
Independence and gained high reputation and 
distinctive success as a financier. He was 
identified with banking interests also in Kan- 
sas City, St. Louis and other Missouri cities 
and he accumulated a substantial fortune 
through his own ability and eflPorts. He and 
his wife continued to maintain their home 
in Independence. Missouri, until 1870, when 
thej' came to Indianapolis, where they passed 
the remainder of their lives in the home of 
their son William B., to whom this sketch 
is dedicated, and who accorded to them in 
their declining days the utmost filial solici- 
tude. Both were zealous members of the 
Methodist Church. They became the parents 
of four sons and two daughters, of whom 
three sons and one daughter are now living, 
all having been reared to maturity in the 
old home town of Independence, Missouri. 

To the schools of his native place, William 
B. Burford 's indebted for his early edu- 
cational training, and later it was to be his 
privilege to receive that training which has 
been consistently said to be the equivalent of 
a liberal education— the discipline of a print- 
ing ofice. When fifteen years of age he came 
to Indianapolis, where he gained his first 
practical knowledge of the "art preservative 
of all arts". He here found employment in 
the job-printing establishment conducted by 



his brother-in-law, the late William Braden, 
and he made rapid progress in his accumu- 
lation of technical knowledge and business 
methods. In the latter part of the year 1863, 
Mr. Burford returned to his home in Mis- 
souri, where he .joined the provisional militia 
of the state, in connection with which he 
took an active part in the border warfare 
against the Confederate guerrillas. In 1864 
he became corporal in a company of ^lissoiii-i 
troops which, though not paid for theii' serv- 
ice by the national government but by the 
State of Missouri, did much effective service 
in restraining hostile demonstrations on the 
part of the guerrillas of southern sympathies, 
as well as in preventing Confederate raids 
and depredations. 

After the close of the Civil War Mr. Bur- 
ford entered college at Independence. Mis- 
souri, where he continued his studies for a 
period of two years and amply fortified him- 
self for entrance upon a business career des- 
tined to be one of marked activity and suc- 
cess. In 1867 he returned to Indianapolis, 
which city has ever since represented his 
home, as has it also been the scene of his 
earnest and fruitfiil efforts as a business 
man. Here he again entered the employ of 
his brother-in-law, Mr. Braden, by whom he 
was admitted to partnership in the business 
in 1870, whereupon the firm name of Braden 
& Burford was adopted. In 1875 Mr. Braden, 
after having met with financial reverses in 
other business enterprises with which he had 
been identified, .sold his interest in the print- 
ing, engraving and stationery business to ^Ir. 
Burford. who has since continued the enter- 
prise without interruption and who has built 
the same up to the best metropolitan standard 
in its line. At numbers 38 and 40 South 
Meridian street are located his offices and 
salesrooms, and on Pearl street. Numbers 17 
to 23, inclusive, in rear of salesrooms, he 
has his finely equipped factory. His estab- 
lishment is locally as well known, practically, 
as that of the city itself, and the enterprise 
is one which stands to the credit of the greater 
city. 

Mr. Burford has never been active in par- 
tisan politics, but this by no means implies 
that he has in any sense been neglectful of 
his civic duties. He is well fortified in his 
opinions as to matters of public polity and as 
a citizen none is more loyal and public- 
spirited. He is a member of the Indianapolis 
Board of Trade and the Commercial Club, 
and is also a member of the German House, 
a representative social organization of the cap- 
ital city. In the time-honored IMasonic fra- 
ternity he has attained to the thirty-second 




^ 4)-^c 



HISTORY OP GREATER INDIANAPOT.TS 



ri3 



degrci in the Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite 
and is also enrolled as a member of Murat 
Temple, Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles 
of the Mystic Shrine, besides being identified 
with the Knights of Pythias. Both he and 
his wife are members of the Meridian Street 
Methodist Episcopal Church and give a lib- 
eral co-operation and support in the various 
departments of its work. 

In 1871, Mr. Burford was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Ella Hobbs, who was born and 
reared in Independence, Missouri, and who 
is a daughter of the late Dr. Samuel and 
J. R. Hobbs, of Independence. In conclu- 
sion of this sketch is entered brief record 
concerning the four children of Mr. and Mrs. 
Burford. Miles AY., who for several years 
was associated actively with his father's busi- 
ness, much to the gratification and satisfac- 
tion of the latter, was finally compelled to 
sever this pleasing relationship on account of 
impaired health, and he now resides at Silver 
City, New Mexico, where he has valuable 
ranching interests. The second son, Ernest 
H., who was his father's valued assistant in 
the management of the business enterprise to 
which reference has been made, died in Au- 
gust,^ 1909. The youngest son, William Bur- 
ford' Jr., is now associated with his father in 
the business. Caroline is the wife of H. R. 
Banner, of New York City. Mr. Danner has 
associated himself with Mr. Burford in the 
business and will make his home in Indian- 



Jefferson H. Clatpool. It has been writ- 
ten that "few sons attain the praise of their 
great sires", but application of this statement 
cannot justly be made in the case of Jefferson 
H. Claypool, a sterling citizen of Indianapolis, 
of whose bar he is an able and honored mem- 
ber, for by his services he has lent dignity to 
the profession in which his father attained to 
distinction, and in connection with public af- 
fairs has he also well upheld the prestige of 
the name which he bears. He is essentially one 
of the representative members of the bar of his 
native state and has long been a power in the 
councils of the Republican party in this com- 
monwealth. Like his honored father, he has 
a character based on intrinsic integrity of pur- 
pose, and this has been shown with all of 'sig- 
nificance in both his professional life and in 
his loyal services as a citizen. He is a scion 
of one of the best known pioneer families of 
the Hoosier state, with whose annals the name 
has been prominently identified for nearly a 
century and in which he is a representative 
of the third generation, being the only survivor 
of the four children of Benjamin F. and Alice 
(Helm) Claypool. 



Hon. Benjamin Franklin Claypool was born 
at ConnersvilJe, J'ayette County, Indiana, on 
the 12th of December, 1825, and that now at- 
tractive little city continued to be his home 
until he was summoned to the life eternal, on 
the 11th of December, 1888, one day before the 
sixty-third anniversary of his birth. He held 
rank for many years as one of the ablest law- 
yers engaged in practice at the Indiana bar, 
was prominently identified with the organiza- 
tion of the Republican party, was a member of 
the senate of his native state during the cli- 
macteric period of the Civil War, was promi- 
nently identified with the early banking inter- 
ests of his state, being one of the directors of 
the Bank of the State of Indiana, and later 
president of the First National Bank of Con- 
nersville, of which he was one of the organ- 
izers in" 1865 ; and during the later years of his 
career he found both solace and profit in agri- 
culture, having identified himself with that 
basic industry and the raising of fine cattle. 
He was a citizen of exalted character and one 
whose personality gained to him the implicit 
confidence and high regard of all with whoa 
he came in contact. 

Hon. Newton Claypool, father of Hon. Ben- 
jamin F. Claypool, was a native of the historic 
Old Dominion state, the family being of stanch 
English extraction and having been founded in 
Virginia in the colonial epoch. He was a man 
of liberal education, according to the standard 
of his day, and this strong intellectual power 
was coupled with mature judgment, so th^t he 
naturally became a leader in thought and action 
after establishing his home in Indiana, prior 
to its admission to the Union. As a youth he 
left his native state and made his way to Ross 
County, Ohio, where ho remained until 1815, 
when he came to Indiana" and established his 
home in Fayette County, where he became one 
of the early settlers of the little hamlet of 
Connersville, now one of the flourishing cities 
of the state. He served several terms in the 
state legislature, as a member of both the 
house and senate, and he wielded much influ- 
ence in public affairs during the formative 
period of the history of this favored common- 
wealth.' He became the owner of large tracts 
of land in Fayette and other counties and con- 
tributed materially to both the civic and in- 
dustrial development of the state. 

Hon. Benjamin F. Claypool gained his earJv 
education in the common schools of Conners- 
ville and supplemented this bv private instruc- 
tion under the tutorship of Professor Nutting, 
a prominent educator of the earlv days in In- 
diana. In the autumn of 1843 Mr. Claypool 
was matriculated in Asbury University, now 
De Piiuw University, at Greenca.*tle, Indiana. 



714 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



where he continued his studies until the spring 
of 184-3, when he withdrew from the institu- 
tion, sliortly before the graduation of the class 
of which he was a member. He forthwith 
began the study of law in the office and imder 
the preceptorship of Hon. Oliver H. Smith, 
who was then the recognized leader of the In- 
dianapolis bar, and under such favorable aus- 
pices he thoroughly fortified himself in the 
science of jurisprudence. He was admitted 
to the bar in 1847, and soon afterward he 
began the active practice of his profession in 
his native town of ConnersYille. He soon rose 
to prominence in his profession, and until the 
day of his death he held precedence as one 
of the ablest lawyers of Indiana. Court rec- 
ords bear adequate evidence of his many foren- 
sic victories, and indicate his appearance in 
connection with much important litigation in 
the state and federal courts in Indiana. 

Early in life Benjamin F. Claypool began 
to manifest a lively interest in political affairs, 
and he was originallv aligned as a supporter 
of the cause of t!ie Whig party. He was prom- 
inently concerned in effecting the national 
organization of the Republican party, and in 
ISofi was a delegate to the first national con- 
vention of the party, in Philadelphia, where 
that body nominated General John C. Fre- 
mont for the presidency. In 1864 he served 
as presidential elector from the Fifth con- 
gressional district of Indiana, and in 1868 
he was one of the electors at large, canvassing 
the entire state of Indiana in the interests of 
the Republican party. In 1860 he was elected 
to represent, in the state senate, the district 
composed of the counties of Fayette and Union, 
and as a member of the upper house of the 
legislature he was one of the leaders of that 
body and one of the most loyal and vigorous 
supporters of the Union. He was an able 
advocate at the bar, of strong dialectic powers, 
an eloquent speaker, and a man of great ver- 
satility of genius. He was ever well fortified 
in his convictions and absolute sincerity and 
honor characterized him in all the relations 
of a life of signal integrity and usefulness. 
Intrinsic nobility indicated the man as he was, 
and his name shall have an enduring place 
in the ciyic history of his native state and 
especially in connection with the annals of its 
bar, whose standard has ever been high. 

In 1874 Benjamin F. Claypool was made the 
candidate of his party for representative of the 
Fifth district of Indiana in Congress, and 
though he made a brilliant campaign in an 
effort to overcome the Democratic tidal wave 
that swept over Indiana in that year, causing 
defeat in most of the Republican Congressional 
districts, he met with defeat which he had 



fully anticipated. While he never thereafter 
appeared as a candidate for public office, he 
never wavered in his allegiance to the "grand 
old party", of whose principles and policies 
he continued an ardent and effective exponent 
until the close of his life. In the year 1853 
was solemnized his marriage to Miss Alice 
Helm, who was likewise born and reared in 
Indiana and who was a daughter of Dr. Jeffer- 
son Helm, of Rushville, Indiana, one of the 
representative physicians and financiers of that 
part of the state. She was a woman of culti- 
vation and most gracious presence, and her 
counsel and sympathy contributed much to the 
success of her husband, as their married life 
was ideal in all its relations. Mrs. Claypool 
was summoi^d to eternal rest in 1882, and, as 
already stated, their only sun'iving child is 
Jefferson H. 

Jefferson Helm Claypool was born at Con- 
nersville, Fayette County, Indiana, on the loth 
of August, 1856, and there he was reared to 
years of maturity, in the meanwhile duly avail- 
ing himself of the advantages of the public 
and private schools and having also the gracious 
influences of a home of distinctive culture and 
refinement. In 1870 he was matriculated in 
iliami University, at O.xford, Ohio, in which 
institution he continued his academic studies 
for four years. Thereafter he attended the his- 
toric old University of Virginia, at Charlottes- 
ville, for one year, after which he returned to 
his native city and began reading law under 
the able preceptorship of his honored father. 
He gave two years to careful study and then, 
in 1877, was "admitted to the bar." He forth- 
with became associated with his father in prac- 
tice, and this mutually gratifying alliance con- 
tinued until the close "of the fathers life. The 
son did not remain in the shadow of his fath- 
er's professional greatness but soon proved his 
mettle as one thoroughly well equipped for 
successful effort at the bar. As an advocate 
he has well upheld the honors of the familv 
name, and few members of the bar of the state 
are more admirably fortified as counselors, as 
he has ever been a close student and has a 
broad and exact knowledge of the law and of 
precedent. While he was associated with his 
father the firm of B. F. Claypool & Son re- 
taiiffed an extensive and lucrative practice, and 
he was thus afforded a wide range of profes- 
sional experience and an opportunity to form 
an extensive acquaintanceship with leading men 
in his profession and in public life. 

From his youth to the present time Mr. 
Clavpool has been unfaltering in his allegiance 
to the Republican party, and he early became 
an act've and zealous worker in b'ehalf of its 
cause. In 1888, in the month prior to the 



HISTOKY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



(Ic^ath of his father, he was elected joint repre- 
sentative of his native county in the state 
legislature, and in 1890 he was again chosen 
joint representative of Fayette and Henry 
counties. During both sessions he was a val- 
ued working member, both on the iioor of the 
house and in the committee room, having been 
a' prominent member of important committee 
on ways and means. He continued in the 
active and successful practice of his profession 
at Connorsville until 1893, when he removed to 
Indianapolis, where he has since maintained his 
home. The exactions of his extensive cap- 
italistic and real estate interests have rendered 
it expedient for him to withdraw largely from 
the practice of his profession in later years, 
and he now devotes his attention almost ex- 
clusively to the management of his farming 
and financial affairs. He is vice-president of 
the First National Bank of Connersville, is 
a stockholder in a number of important busi- 
ness corporations in that city, is the owner of 
a landed estate comprising fully 800 acres 
in Delaware County. Indiana, and also has 
much valuable realty' in the capital city. As 
a citizen he is essentially loyal and progressive 
and the "Greater Indianapolis" finds in him 
one o'f its most public-spirited residents. 

Mr. Claypool has by no means abated his 
active interest in the promotion of the cause 
of the Republican party, in which he has been 
a leader in his state for a long term of years. 
He has rendered material assistance in the 
preparation of several of the state platforms 
of his party in Indiana and has otherwise been 
a potent factor in its councils. In 1896 he was 
chairman of the advisory committee of the 
Republican state central committee, and since 
1898 he has served consecutively as one of the 
board of state election commissioners. In the 
past fifteen years he has made many valuable 
contributions to the public press, his articles 
being principally on political and economic 
questions. Of him the following statement has 
been made: "He believes in clean politics, 
civil service and single gold standard, and with 
courage and force gives expression to his views. 
He hates the demagogue above all others, and is 
honored for his sincerity and straightforward- 
ness." 

'y\T. Claypool is identified with various clubs, 
and in 1905 he was president of the Indiana 
association of the Delta Kappa Epsilon col- 
lesrc fraternity; in 1909 he was president of 
Miami T'niversitv Association of Indiana. 

In October, 1893, Mr. Clavnool was united 
in niarr'age to ^liss Marv Buckner Ross, the 
onlv child of Major John W. Ross, an honored 
and influential citizen of Connersville. The 
nnlv child of this union is Benjamin F., who 



was born in December, 189-1. Mr. and Mrs. 
Claypool maintain their home at No. 1303 
North Meridian street, Indianapolis. 

James E. McCullotigh. A representative 
member of the bar of Indiana, Mr. I\IcCul- 
lough has been engaged in the practice of his 
profession in Indianapolis for more than 
twenty j^ears. Throuah his labors he has hon- 
ored the profession of which he is a member 
and his precedence in the same is the direct 
result of his profound knowledge of the 
minutiae of the science of jurisprudence, his 
ability in making practical application of the 
same, and his sterling character as a man 
among men. He has been prominent in pub- 
lic affairs and is recognized as one of the 
leaders in the ranks of the Democratic party 
in Indiana. 

James E. ]McCullough,was born in Hamil- 
ton County, Ohio, on the 1st of April. 1847, 
and is a son of Jacob and Lucinda (Noble) 
McCullough. Jacob McCullough was likewise 
a native of Ohio and was a scion of one of 
the old and honored pioneer families of the 
Buckeye commonwealth. His wife was born 
in South Carolina, whence her parents re- 
moved to Ohio in the early pioneer epoch. 
In 1857, when the subject of this review was 
a lad of ten years, his {Barents removed from 
Ohio to Spencer County, Indiana, where his 
father purchased land and developed a valu- 
able farm. He was a man of strong individ- 
uality and impregnable integrity of character, 
and he wielded no little influence in public 
affairs of a local order. Both he and his 
wife continued to maintain their home in 
Spencer County until their death. 

Mr. McCullough gained his rudimentary ed- 
ucation in the common schools of Hamilton 
County, Ohio, and Spencer County, Indiana, 
and in 1868 he was matriculated in the lit- 
erary department of the University of In- 
diana, at Bloomington in which he completed 
the prescribed course and was graduated as 
a member of the cla.ss of 1871, with the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Arts. He had simul- 
taneously pursued the studies of the law de- 
partment of the university, and his capacity 
for accumulation and assimilation of knowl- 
edge is indicated in the fact that he was 
graduated in the law school in the same year 
that marked his graduation in the literary 
department. He thus received at the same 
time his degree of Bachelor of Laws. For 
a short time after his graduation Mr. McCul- 
lough was in the law office of Hon. Samuel 
H. Buskii'k. of Bloomington, Indiana, who 
later became an associate justice of the Su- 
preme Court of Indiana. 

Mr. McCulloueh was admitted to the bar 



in 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



of liidiiiiia in iJSTl. shortly after his uradiui- 
tion ill the law department of the state uni- 
versity, and he then opened an office in 
I'etersbii !•<,', I'ikc County, where he f'jriiied 
a law f)artnership with Hon. John H. ililler, 
with whom he was there associated in the 
jiractiee of his profession until 1875, when 
he removed to Princeton, the county seat of 
(jibson County, whither ]Mr. Miller soon after- 
ward followed him, whereupon the former 
]>artnersliip was resumed in the new location. 
The firm soon jraiiied hi^di prestige in its new 
field and Mr. ^leCullouuh secured recognition 
as one of the leading members of his pro- 
fession in southern Indiana. He has strong 
dialectic powers, a keen perception of the 
salient points in every cause presented and 
a thorough knowledge of law and precedent, 
so that he has marked facility as a trial law- 
yer and strength and authority as a counselor. 
He has admirably developed his oratorical 
l)owers, and thus gains added strength in 
I)resentinu: his cases before court or jury, be- 
sides which his services have been much in 
demand as a campaign speaker, in which field 
of service he has done niost eft'ective work. 
He has been identified with iiiiich important 
litigation in both the State and Federa! 
Courts, his clientage has been of representa- 
tivi' character, and his record in his profession 
has been marked by distinctive success, in wit- 
ness of which no further voucher is demanded 
than that offered in his high standing at the 
bar of the state. 

In politics ^Fr. ^IcCnllougli is aligned a.? 
an unconipromising advocate of the princi- 
ples and policies for which the Democratic 
party stands sponsor, and in its cause he has 
rendered yeoman service. In 1882, he was 
elected to represent a senatorial district in 
the state Senate, said district comprising Gib- 
son and Posey counties. He proved a valu- 
able working member of the upper house 
of the state legislature, in w-hich he served 
with distinction during the sessions of the 
general assembly in 1883 and 1885, being 
chairman of the judiciary committee during 
the latter session. The prestige gained by 
:\Ir. :McCulloiigb while in the Senate undoubt- 
edly marked him further as a most eligible 
candidate for nomination, in 1886, as stan- 
dard bearer of his party for the office of 
rei)resentative in Congress from the first con- 
gressional district, and while he made a cam- 
paign he met defeat with the remainder of 
the |)nrty ticket in the election of that year. 

In 18*88, :\[r. :\rrCullough removed' to In- 
dianapolis and formed a ])arfnership with 
Hie late fiivingston Howland. with whom he 
was associated in the practice of his profes- 



sion until his partner was elected to the bench 
of the Circuit Court of Marion County, in 
1889. In 1800 Mr. :McCullough was again 
called to public office, having been elected to 
represent Marion County in the lower house 
of the state legislature. He was assigned to 
various iniportant committees, including the 
committee on the capital city of the state, of 
which same he w'as chairman. As such he 
did most effective work in securing to Indiaii- 
apolis its present admirable city charter and 
he also championed various other measures 
which have conserved the best interests of the 
city. Since his retirement from the legis- 
lature he has given his attention to his large 
and important professional business, wli(j-,e 
exactions leave to him but few hours of 
leisure. The only fraternity he is affiliated 
with is the college fraternity Sigma Chi. 

In 1872, Mr. McCullough was united iu 
marriage to Miss Emma Turner, who died in 
1877, leaving one child, Walter McCullough. 
In 1881, was solemnized l\Ir. McCullough 's 
marriage to Miss Ella Welborn, of Gibson 
County, Indiana, a daughter of the late Sam- 
uel Welborn. Mr. and Mrs. McCullough have 
been members of the Presbyterian Church for 
a year, Mrs. ilcCullough having perviously 
been a member of the Primitive Baptist 
Church. 

Wii.Li.\M T. S. DoDus. M. D. One of the 
able and popular representatives of the med- 
ical profession in the City of Indianapolis is 
Dr. William T. S. Dodds, who is here en- 
gaged in general practice as a physician and 
surgeon and who is giving special attention 
to his work as director of the tuberculosis 
movement in the capital city, under the direc- 
tion of the local board of health. 

Dr. Dodds was born in Bellefontaine, Logan 
County, Ohio, on the 30th of December. 1873. 
and is a son of Rilus S. and ]\Iartha (Kaylor) 
Dodds. His father, who was a successful con- 
tractor at Bellefontaine, died in that place 
in 1884, as the result of an accident, and was 
but thirty-three years of age at the time of 
his demise. His wife now maintaLns her 
home in the City of Springfield, Ohio, and 
he is also survived by two sons and two 
daughters, namely : Dr. William T. S., 
Harry, !\Tyrtle and ^laud. He was a Repub- 
lican in his proclivities and was a consistent 
member of the ]\Iethodist Episcopal Church, 
with which his wife also has long been iden- 
tified as a zealous member. He was of stanch 
Scottish ancestry and was himself a native of 
Cincinnati, having been a son of Rilus Dodds, 
who immigrated with his family to America 
in 1852, locating in the City of Cincinnati, 
Ohio, in which state his wife passed the resi- 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



due of her life. He died en route while 
making an overland trip to California in the 
early days. The mother of Dr. Dodds is a 
representative of one of the old and patrician 
families of the State of Virginia. 

Dr. William T. S. Dodds is indebted to the 
public schools of the old Buckeye state for 
his earty educational discipline, which in- 
cluded a course in the high schools at Zanes- 
tield, in which he was graduated as a mem- 
ber of the class of 1889. After leaving school 
he was variously engaged until August, 1895, 
when he removed from Bellefontaine, Ohio, 
his native city, to Indianapolis, where he 
was matriculated in the Indiana Medical Col- 
lege, in which he completed the prescribed 
technical course and was graduated as a mem- 
ber of the class of 1898, with the degree of 
Doctor of Medicine. After his graduation he 
engaged in practice in the capital city, where 
he has been most faithful and successful in 
his chosen vocation and where he now con- 
trols a large and representative professional 
business, based alike upon his skill and his 
personal popularity in the community. Soon 
after his graduation Dr. Dodds was appointed 
deputy coroner under Dr. A. W. Brayton, 
who' was then serving his first term as coroner 
of Marion County, and he held this position 
of deputy during a period of one year. Dr. 
Dodds received from Governor Mount the ap- 
pointment of physician to Camp Mount Hos- 
pital, maintained in Indianapolis for the care 
of the ill and wounded Indiana soldiers upon 
their return from the Spani.sh-American War, 
in the autumn of 1898. On the 13th of 
October, 1908, Dr. Dodds was one of the 
organizers of the Indianapolis Tuberculosis 
Clinic, and in May of the following year he 
organized and established the Indianapolis 
tuberculosis colony, on the grounds of the 
City Hospital. He has made a most careful 
study of the "white plague", and is most 
earnest and enthusiastic in the work of bring- 
ing about proper preventive and palliative 
agencies for its subjection. He is the repre- 
sentative of the Indianapolis board of health 
as director of the tuberculosis movement in 
this city. The local tuberculosis colony, in 
which excellent provisions are made for the 
care of the afflicted, opened with eleven pa- 
tients, in the incipient sta»es of the dread 
malady, and the facilities of the camp will 
be much improved w-ithin the coming year. 
Dr. Dodds is a stanch adherent of the Repub- 
lican party and has taken an active interest 
in the promotion of its cause. He is identi- 
fied with the American ^ledical Association, 
the Indiana State Medical Society, and the 
]\Iarion County Medical Society. He and his 



wife are connnunicants of the Protestant 
Episcopal Church, in which they are members 
of St. Paul's parish. In the JMasonic fra- 
ternity the doctor is affiliated with Ancient 
Landmarks Lodge, No. 319, Free & Accepted 
Masons; Keystone Chajiter, No. 6, Royal Aich 
^Masons; Raper Commandery, No. 1, Knights 
Templars; Indiana Consistory, Ancient Ac- 
cepted Scottish Rite; and Murat Temple, An- 
cient Arabic Order of the Nobles of the JMys- 
tic Shrine. 

On the 15th of April, 1897, was solemnized 
the marriage of Dr. Dodds to ]Miss Mai'garet 
M. Johnson, who was born at Bellefontaine, 
Ohio, on the 11th of AuLnist, 1874, and who 
is a daughter of George Jl. and Kate (Hayes) 
Johnson, both of whom were born and reared 
in Ohio, where the former died in 1902, at 
the age of fifty-nine yeai's. He was one of 
the honored and prominent citizens of Belle- 
fontaine, where he was engaged in the jewelry 
business for many years. He served during 
four years of the Civil War, and was cap- 
tured by the enemy, who held him as a pris- 
oner of war on Belle Isle, Virginia, for a 
period of four weeks. His widow now resides 
in Indianapolis. Dr. and Jlrs. Dodds have 
two daughters— Margaret and Jean. 

William A. Bristol. Prominent among 
the business men of Indianapolis is numbered 
AVilliam A. Bristor, who was born in this 
city September 4, 1843, a son of Samuel M. 
and Estra A. (Kellum) Bri.stor, the father 
being born in AVashington County, Pennsyl- 
vania, in 1811, and the mother on the present 
site of the City of Indianapolis. They were 
married in this city, and two children were 
born to them, William A. and Elizabeth M., 
the daughter being the wife of John M. Ham- 
let. Samuel j\I. Bristor spent his boyhood 
days in Washington, Pennsylvania, where he 
learned and followed the carriage-maker's 
trade. Coming to Indianapolis in 1840, he 
obtained employment with Howard Foltz, and 
later was engaged in the manufacture of 
wagons and carriages for himself until his 
retirement at the age of fifty-seven years. He 
was a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church (Roberts Park Church), and was one 
of its trustees for a number of years. At 
the time of the Civil War he left the ranks 
of the Democratic party and transferred his 
allegiance to the Republicans. 

William A. Bristor attended public school 
and the Northwestern Christian University, 
now known as Butler College, and from 1866 
until 1902 he was prominently identified with 
the business life of IndiaTiapolis as a shoe 
merchant. In 1902 he leti red from the shoe 
trade. In 1906, he or^canized the Arizona 



lis 



HISTOKY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



Climax Mining Company of Arizona, and has 
since served as its president. 

On the 16th of P'ebniary, 1871, Mr. Bristor 
was married to Emma Burton, also born in 
Indianapolis, a daughter of ^[artin and Sarah 
(Nichols) Burton. The father, bom in New 
Hampshire, came to Clinton County, Indiana, 
in 1822, and became an Indian trader and he 
also laid out a part of Russiaville. Coming to 
Indianapolis in 1826 he engaged in the mill- 
ing business, later in the shoe business and 
still later became a manufacturer of trunks. 
Selling his interest in the latter business, he 
became a real estate dealer and an extensive 
'and holder. He was a member of the Uni- 
versalist Church and of the "Whig and later 
of the Republican parties. He died in the 
year of 1908, when ninety years of age, and 
his widow still survives him and has reached 
her eighty-sixth year. She was born in Clin- 
ton County, Indiana. Their three children 
are : Addie, the widow of John D. Campbell ; 
Emma, who became the wife of Mr. Bristor-, 
and Ora. wife of H. H. Condit. Two children 
have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Bristor, 
Birdie and Albert ^I. Bristor. The daughter 
is the wife of Charles E. Field, general claim 
agent for the IMonon Railroad Company, and 
the son is a prominent attorney in Indianap- 
olis. Mr. Bristor, Sr., gives his political sup- 
port to the Republican party. 

Dr. FLAVirs J. Van Vouhis, of Indianapo- 
lis, who, both by education and practice, is 
a thorough physician and lawyer, is a leader in 
the public affairs of the state. From the fact 
that he drafted the bill which resulted in the 
establishment of the first State Board of Health 
of Indiana and that he was prominent in or- 
ganizing it in detail, he is called the "father 
of Indiana health legislation" ; has also played 
a large part in solving the intricate problem 
connected with the 5v«tematic, legal and just 
appraisal of railroad property and, in other 
ways, been identified with important reforms 
of vital concern to the citv and state. Mr. 
Van Yorhis is a native of Pike Townshin, Ma- 
rion County, born on the 31st of December, 
1840, and is a son of Isaac N. and Sarah i 
(Cotton) Yan Yorhis. His father was born 
in Ohio of Dutch ancestrv and bis mother in 
A'irginia of English lineage, so that his stock 
is of the most persistent, sturdy and practical 
type of abilitv. The Yan Yorhis family early 
settled in Now Jersey, migrating thence to 
Ohio and Indiana and in 1813 becoming a 
fixture in Wavne Countv, of the latter state. 
Isaac W. Yan Yorhis, the future father, was 
then a child and spent most of the years of his 
maturity a= a farmer and meclianic of Clarion 
County. 



Flavius J. was reared in the family home- 
stead in Eagle Township, Boone County, at- 
tending select school at Zionville, Indiana, and 
the Northwestern Christian University (now 
Butler College), and later teaching school — 
all in preparation for a professional life. The 
first inclination of his ambitions in that field 
was toward medicine and his first systematic 
studies were conducted under Dr. H. T. Cot- 
ton, of Clinton County, Indiana. In 1865 Dr. 
Yan Yorhis graduated from Rush Medical Col- 
lege, Chicago, and began the practice of med- 
icine in Tippecanoe County, Indiana. His 
desire to adopt that profession was doubtless 
strengthened, if not formed, bv his experience 
in the Civil War. In 1862 he had entered 
the Union army as a private ; was assigned to 
hospital duty; became assistant surgeon in 
the Eighty-sixth Indiana Regiment and later, 
for eighteen months, had surgical charge of the 
command, being discharged in 1865 at tlie 
termination of the war. In 1871-2 Dr. Yan 
Yorhis took a post-graduate course in Bellevue 
Hospital Medical College, New York, and after- 
ward became a permanent resident of Indian- 
apolis. He was superintendent of the Indian- 
apolis Hospital in 1876-7, and about this time 
began the study of law, graduating from the 
Central Law School and being admitted to the 
bar in 1880. The same year he w^s elected 
state senator, and has since been prominent 
as a public man and an attorney, although he is 
still known as Dr. Yan Yorhis. 

In 1888-91 Dr. Yan Yorhis was engaged by 
the commissioners of ^Marion County to assist 
in securing a proper appraisement of rail- 
road property, and this service resulted in the 
increase, in 1891, of the assessment of rail- 
road property in Indiana of about $100,000,000, 
and led to his connection with subsequent valu- 
able legislation in the same line. As stated, 
the State Board of Health owes its existence 
to him, and, although he has been independent 
in politics, he has acquired a wide and strong 
influence among all parties and classes. Until 
1896 he was a Republican, but in that year 
he supported William J. Bryan on the financial 
question and served as chairman of the Indiana 
State Silver Republican party. He continued 
his support of Mr. Bryan in 1900, campaigned 
for Thomas Watson in 1904, and has always 
had the courage to abandon any political or- 
ganization when its platform was not in ac- 
cord with his private views. In his special rela- 
tions to Indianapolis, he has been classed as 
among its stanch and enterprising citizens, and 
has been in many ways a contributor to the 
upbuilding of the city. His legal practice has 
greatly contributed both to the increase of his 
reputation and his financial strength, and he is 




^^^>-«^-*<Z7/0*fe 




HISTOEY OF GEEATER INDIANAPOLIt 



"19 



the .buildiT ami proprietor of the Van Vorliir: 
office block, as well as the owner of other valu- 
able property. In 1SG4 Dr. Van Vorhis mar- 
ried Miss Emma Burton, daughter of John ('. 
and Nancy (Wall) Burton, and their daughter. 
Carrie, is now the wife of Herman F. Spran- 
del, of Indianapolis. 

Jacob C. Sipe. A representative busi- 
ness man and sterling citizen of "Greater 
Indianapolis" is Jacob Corpenny Sipe, whole- 
sale and retail and manufacturing- jeweler 
and diamond importer, with headquarters at 
181/2 North ileridian street. He has built up 
a large and substantial enterprise and the 
same is based on fair and honorable dealings 
as well as his personal popularity as a citizen. 

Mr. Sipe is a native of the old Keystone 
state of the Union, having been born in Con- 
nellsville, Pennsylvania, on the 27th of Oc- 
tober, 1863, and being a son of Aaron and 
Rosa A. (Corpenny) Sipe. The father was 
a native of Pennsylvania, in which state the 
family was early founded, and was a repre- 
sentative of stanch German lineage. The 
father was born in 1826 and died in Kokomo, 
Indiana, in 1872, at the age of forty-six years. 
His wife was born in 1829, in Virginia, and 
was a resident of Kokomo at the time of her 
death, which occurred in 1903. when she was 
seventy-six years of age. Of the nine chil- 
dren of this union seven are living, and the 
subject of this review was the sixth in order 
of birth. Aaron Sipe was a cabinetmaker by 
trade, and for a number of years he was en- 
gaged in contracting and building in the City 
of Pittsburg. Pennsylvania, whence he even- 
tually removed to Kankakee County, Illinois, 
where he purchased a farm and where he 
continued to devote his attention to agricul- 
tural pursuits until his death. 

Jacob C. Sipe was about one and one-half 
years of age at the time of the family re- 
moval from Pennsylvania to Illinois, and his 
educational advantages were those afforded in 
the public schools of that state and the In- 
diana State Normal School at Terre Haute, 
in which institution he was a student for two 
years. When fifteen years of age Mr. Sipe 
entered upon a practical apprenticeship to 
learn the jeweler's trade and business, and 
his advantages for eflfective training in this 
line were of the best order, as he began his 
work in the establishment of John "W. John- 
son, of New York City. He became a skilled 
workman and when nineteen years of age 
he became a traveling: salesman for the jew- 
elry house of Sipe & Sigler, of Cleveland, 
Ohio, with which concern he was thus identi- 
fied for eighteen months. In ^March. 1884, 
ilr. Sipe took up his residence in Indianap- 



olis, where he engageil in business on his 
own responsibility, and here he has gained 
precedence as the leading diamond importer 
and dealer of the .state, while he also eon- 
ducts a large and prosperous enterprise as a 
manufacturing jeweler and a wholesale and 
i-etail dealer in jewelry. Since the year 1890 
he has personally visited at intervals the lead- 
ing diamond markets of Europe, and has 
there selected stock to meet the demands of 
his large and discriminating trade, the while 
he has kept in close touch with all the mod- 
ern ideas in the cutting of precious stones 
and the manufacturing of the most artistic 
and original jewelry. Three of his brothers 
are engaged in the same line of business- 
one in Buffalo, New York; one in Cleveland, 
Ohio; and the third in Pittsburg, Pennsyl- 
vania. Mr. Sipe buys precious stones in the 
rough and the cutting and manufacturing of 
the same is done in his own finely equipped 
establishment and under his personal super- 
vision, so that he has unexcelled facilities for 
catering to his large and appreciative patron- 
age, which is of essentially representative or- 
der. In 1902 he and his wife made an ex- 
tended trip through Great Britain and the 
European continent, visiting all the principal 
cities and points of historic interest. 

Mr. Sipe finds his chief diversion in sports 
afield and afloat, and has gained no little re- 
pute as a "mighty hunter", like Nimrod of 
old. He has been a successful hunter of large 
game and has a number of splendid trophies 
of the hunt, in the way of mounted heads of 
deer, bears and other large game. He has 
made extensive hunting trips in the west and 
in Mexico, having given himself such interest- 
ing and wholesome relation since 1882 and 
spending from one to three months each year 
in this fine sport. 

Mr. Sipe is a careful, conservative and 
reliable business man and one of progressive 
ideas, as is evidenced in the distinctive suc- 
cess he has gained since establishing his resi- 
dence and business headquarters in the In- 
diana capital, and while he is essentially 
loyal and public-spirited as a citizen and is 
a stanch supporter of the cause of the Re- 
publican part}^ he has never shown any pre- 
dilection or desire for political office of any 
description. He is well known and held in 
high popular esteem in his home city, where 
he is a member of the Columbia Club and is 
prominently identified with the Masonic fra- 
ternity, in which he has attained to the thirty- 
second degree of the Ancient Accepted Scot- 
tish Rite, beiny: affiliated with Indiana Sov- 
ereign Consistory, and also holding member- 



•20 



HISTORY OF GREATER IXDIAXAl'OLIS. 



ship in :Murat Temple, Ancient Arabic Order 
of the Nobles of tlie ;\Iystie Shrine. 

On the 15th of June, 1898, Mr. Sipe was 
united in marriage to IMiss Mabel Chamber- 
lin Brown, who was born and reared in Elk- 
hart, Indiana, being the second in order of 
birth of the five children of t)r. Adrian and 
Helena (Chaniberlin) Brown, the former of 
whom is deceased and the latter of whom now 
resides in Indianapolis. Dr. Brown was a 
physician by profession and he also conducted 
a drug store in Elkhart for many years, being 
identified with this line of enterprise at the 
time of his death. Mr. and Mrs. Sipe have 
three children— Helena R.. Charles B. and 
Carroll E. 

Oliver W. Pierce. It can scarcely be de- 
nied that this is an essentially commercial 
age, but it is also gratifying to note that in 
almost every populous community may be 
found those elements -which represent the 
higher ideals of life and illume the more 
sordid and utilitarian phases. There is a dis- 
tinct correlation in all art expression and to 
the one who becomes appreciative each form 
of such expression must bear its measure of 
uplift and subjective pleasure. This is es- 
pecially true of music, which in its manifold 
forms and ramifications can touch all sorts 
and conditions of men, and in the beautiful 
capital city of Indiana there is found a tnl- 
ented and popular exemplar of this "divine 
art" in the person of Oliver Willard Pierce, 
an accomplished pianist, theorist and student 
in the domain of musical expression. As an 
interpretive artist he has special precedence, 
and as a teacher his success has been on a 
parity with his fine talents. He has proved 
a valuable acquisition to the generic art and 
social life of Indianapolis and, standing rep- 
resentative in his profession, he is eminently 
entitled to consideration in this publication. 
He has fostered and broadened distinctive 
natural talent through well directed study 
under the ablest musical instructors in Amer- 
ica and on the European continent, notably 
the world-renowned master, IMoszkowski, who 
was his teacher in Berlin. Germany, and who 
showed special marks of favor and prefer- 
ence. 

Mr. Pierce is a native of the City of Hills- 
dale, Michigan, where he was born on the 
19th of February, 1869, and he is a son of 
Hiram and IMarie (Cooper) Pierce, both of 
whom were representatives of stanch old New 
England stock in Massachusetts and Vermont. 
In that cradle of so nnich of our national 
history the lineage in the maternal line is 
traced back through the Puritan ancestry to 
the time of the Pil<rrim fathers. Hiram 



Pierce was a man whose vocation, that of 
a commercial traveler, enabled him to afford 
his children good educational advantages, and 
the latter further had special privileges in 
the appreciative care and guidance of a 
mother of distinctive culture and refinement. 
Mrs. Marie (Cooper) Pierce was a woman of 
high scholastic attainments and Avas for nearly 
twenty years preceptress and professor of 
history and belles lettres in Hillsdale College, 
Michigan. Thus the subject of this review 
received his earlier educational discipline al- 
most entirely under the tutorship of his 
mother, by whom he was prepared to enter 
college. He was matriculated in the classical 
or academic department of Hillsdale College, 
in which he was graduated as a member of 
the class of 1891 and from which he received 
the degree of Bachelor of Arts. He had simul- 
taneously prosecuted his technical studies 
in the mu-sical conservatory of this well or- 
dered institution of learning. In 1894, he re- 
ceived from his alma mater the degree of 
Master of Arts, rfe was president of his class 
in his junior year in college and won the ora- 
torical prize of the Amphictyon literary so- 
ciety in that year. At his graduation he also 
secured both the Crandell literary prize and 
the Martin mathematical prize, the first time 
in the history of the college that both of these 
coveted honors had been won by the same 
student. After leaving Hillsdale College Mr. 
Pierce pursued his musical studies in the Bos- 
ton Conservatory of Music and in Europe, 
and after his return to the United States he 
held for two years the position of principal 
of the piano department of the musical con- 
servatory of the Ohio Wesleyan University, at 
Delaware. 

In September, 1894, Mr. Pierce came to 
Indianapolis and identified himself with the 
school of music that was then conducted on 
Monument place, and in January of the fol- 
lowing year he was one of the founders of 
the Metropolitan School of ^Music, o1 which 
institution he was a director. In 1907, he 
founded the College of Musical Art, of which 
he is now president. 

Mr. Pierce, with the advantages of fine 
classical education, foreign travel and study, 
and distinctive talent as a pianist, has made 
a specialty of lecture recitals, through which 
he has been able to give classical embellish- 
ment to the literary and interpretive side of 
the musical art, thus promoting deeper ob- 
jective appreciation and bringing about more 
adequate conception of the nuisical form and 
expression. In this particular field his serv- 
ices have been much in requisition by musical 
and literarv clubs and other organizations. 





1 



HISTORY OF GREATER IXDIANAPOLIS. 



rsi 



He has appeared before various state musical 
associations, and has twice served as chair- 
man of the program committee of the Indiana 
JIusic Teachers' Association. He has had the 
distinction of being soloist with orchestral ac- 
companiment at two May musical festivals in 
Indianapolis, and in the same way he has 
played on various other occasions of equal 
importance and interest. In December, 1898, 
he was piano sotoist with Van der Stuken's 
orchestra at the time of its appearance before 
the Ohio State Music Teachers' Association. 

In politics l\Ir. Pierce is found arrayed as 
a stanch supporter of the principles and pol- 
icies for which the Republican party stands 
sponsor in a generic wa}% but in local affairs, 
where no issues are involved, he is indepen- 
dent of strict partisan lines. He is identified 
with the Columbia Club of Indianapolis, and 
in the Masonic fraternity he has attained to 
the thirty-second degree of the Ancient Ac- 
cepted Scottish Rite, is past commander of 
Raper Ccrmmandery. No. 1, Knights Templar, 
besides being identified with the Ancient 
Arabic Order of the Nobles of the Mystic 
Shrine, in which he holds membership in 
Murat, Temple, of Indianapolis. 

Albert E. JIetzger. Among the sterling 
citizens and aggressive business men who stand 
exponent of that loyalty and progressive spirit 
that have conserved the development of the 
larger and greater Indianapolis, Albert E. 
Metzger occupies a place of no insignificant 
prestige, and he has been identified with vari- 
ous and very important enterprises that have 
had marked influence in furthering the indus- 
trial and commercial advancement of the cap- 
ital city. He represents a distinctive power in 
local financial circles and is at this time 
president of the German American Trust Com- 
pany, which exercises beneficent functions and 
is fortified by all that is reliable in executive 
control and capitalistic reinforcement, being es- 
sentia41y one of the leading and strongest insti- 
tutions of its kind in the state of Indiana. 

Albert E. ^letzger is a native of Indian- 
apolis and this citv has renresented his home 
from the time of his nativity to the present — 
an interval marked by large and worthy ac- 
complishment on his part. Mr. Metzger was 
bom on the 20th of March, ISfiS, and is a son 
of Alexander and Wilhelmina (Elbracht) 
Metzger, both of whom were born and reared 
in Germany, whence thev imrtiigrated by sail- 
boat to America in 1847, landing in the city 
of New Orleans and thence proceeding by boat 
up the Mississippi and Ohio irivers to Cin- 
cinnati, where they maintained their home for 
three years, at the cxniration of which tliev 
removed to Indianapolis, which was then a 



small and inconspicuous city, though one whose 
future possibilities appealed to :Mr. Metzger, 
who remained one of its loyal and honored citi- 
zens until his death, whichi occurred on the 4th 
day of August, 1890. He identified himself 
thoroughly with the business and civic activ- 
ities of the Hoosier capital and to him belongs 
the distinction of having here established the 
first steam hahery in the state of Indiana. He 
had learned the baker's trade in his father- 
land and having worked under Peter F. 
Bryce at that time in Cincinnati was well for- 
tified for the handling of the enterprise which 
he thus established in Indianapolis, then a 
small village. He was endowed with marked 
pragmatic ability, indefatigable energy and 
sterling integrity of purpose, so that he soon 
gained precedence as one of the successful and 
substantial business men of, the city. The bak- 
ery, which he founded, was located on the site 
of the present Aetna building, on North Penn- 
sylvania street, and he conducted a large and 
prosperous business for a long term of years, 
eventually disposing of the plant and business 
to Parrott, Nickum & Company, who continued 
the business for many years, until it was ab- 
sorbed by the National Biscuit Company. Upon 
retiring from this line of enterprise in 1863 
Alexander Metzger laid the foundation of a 
general financial agency which, after forty-five 
years of effective service, was finally reorgan- 
ized as the German American Trust Company, 
of which his son, Albert E., has been president 
from the time of incorporation in 1906. In 
1865 Alexander Metzger associated himself 
with August and Henry Schnull, Volney T. 
Malott, David Macy, and Ferdinand Beck 
as directors in the organization of the 
Merchants' National Bank, which has 
since become one of the strongest finan- 
cial institutions of our state. He built up 
a large and important business in the local 
financial field, and ever commanded the unquali- 
fied confidence and esteem of the community, 
as his business affairs were ordered and directed 
according to the strictest principles of integrity 
and fairness and his personal characteristics 
were those indicative of sterling manhood. He 
did much to further the best interests and the 
material and civic advancement of the capital 
city and was one of its well known and in- 
fluential citizens up to the time of his demise. 
The widow of Alexander Metzger is still living, 
having celebrated her 80th birthday August 3, 
1909. 

Albert E. Metzger, whose name introduces 
this review, was afforded the advantages of the 
excellent public schools of Indianapolis, and 
iifter his graduation in the hisrh school ho was 
matriculated in Cornell Universitv, at Ithaca. 



HISTORY OF GREATEK INDIANAPOLIS. 



New York, in whitli he completed the pre- 
scribed course in science and letters and was 
graduated as a member of the class of 1888. 
While a student in the high school and in the 
university, Mr. Metzger manifested much inter- 
est in athletics and military affairs, and though 
only two years of military training were com- 
pulsory at Cornell University, his interest in 
this department was such that he enjoyed the 
full four years of military work, in connection 
with which he became* major of the university 
battalion. It should be noted that Mr. Metz- 
ger's kindly interest and fond solicitation for 
his alma mater has never waned since his gra'd- 
uation. Lately he was elected a member of 
the Cornell Council, the governing body of 
the alumni, and since its organization has been 
president of the Indiana Cornell Alumni As- 
sociation. 

After leaving the university Mr. Metzger re- 
turned to Indianapolis, with whose business 
and civic activities he has since been concerned 
in a most definite and influential way, espe- 
cially in connection with the promotion and 
conducting of financial institutions of the high- 
est grade. He became associated with his 
father in business and soon developed marked 
acumen and versatility as a financier and ex- 
ecutive. The business established by his father 
was conducted under the title of A. Metzger 
Agency for many years, and this enterprise was 
the virtual nucleus around which has been 
built up the stanch and extensive business of 
the German American Trust Company. 

In ] 896 Albert E. Jletzger became associated 
with Herman Lieber, Charles N. Thompson, 
Allan Fletcher, Frank M. Fauvre and others in 
the organization and incorporation of the Ma- 
rion Trust Company, and for several years 
thereafter he was a valued member of its 
directorate and also its executive committee. 
In 1900 Mr. Metzger became associated with 
John Perrin, Herman Lieber and others in 
the organization of the American National 
Bank of Indianapolis, of which he was one of 
the organizers and incorporators and of which 
he was a director during the first five years 
of the existence of the institution. He re- 
tired from this directorate in 1906, at which 
time he effected the organization of the German 
American Trust Company, of which he has 
been president from the time of incorporation 
and to whose interests he has since given the 
major portion of his time and attention. 

Mr. Sfetzger resigned his position as a mem- 
ber of the directorate of the American Na- 
tional Bank in order to devote his undivided 
time and attention to the affairs of the German 
American Trust Company. Upon his retire- 
"lent from his active administrative associa- 



tion with the affairs of the American National 
Bank the following resolution presented by the 
president was adopted by its board of directors, 
under date of July 14, "1906: 

"Resolved, That, in accepting the resigna- 
tion from this board which Albert E. Metzger 
has offered in anticipation of serving as the 
president of another financial institution, we 
set forth in our minutes an .expression of our 
personal regret at the discontinuance of this 
association with him and of gratitude on be- 
half of the bank for the zealous and efficient 
service which he has freely rendered from the 
day of its organization to the present"' 

His able and discriminating administrative 
policy has been potent in making the German 
American Trust Company one of the great 
financial and fiduciary concerns of the middle 
west, and he has gained priority as one of the 
able and influential financiers of his native city 
and state, where he has ever maintained an in- 
violable hold upon popular confidence and es- 
teem. 

As a citizen Mr. Jletzger has stood exponent 
of the utmost loyalty and public spirit, and it 
has been to him a matter of pleasure and un- 
qualified satisfaction to lend his aid and influ- 
ence in the promotion of all legitimate meas- 
ures and enterprises tending to conserve the 
best interests of his home city and state. He 
was prominently identified with promotion and 
financing of the corporation through which nat- 
ural gas service was secured to Indianapolis, 
and later, after the failure of the natural gas 
resources, he was one of the most attractive 
workers for the securing to the people of thf 
capital city proper artificial gas service at rea- 
sonable rates. He thus became treasurer of 
the Gas Consumers' League, which was subse- 
quently reorganized as the Citizens' Gas Com- 
pany, of which latter he was one of the organ^r 
izcrs and a member of the first board of di- 
rectors, ifr. Metzger was also a director of 
the German Manual Training School, which 
was finally absorbed by the present Manual 
Training High School maintained by the city, 
imder the direct administration of the Board 
of Education. It is interesting to record that 
the German Manual Training School men- 
tioned was that from which the present city 
school of like character has been developed — 
a valuable acquisition to the public educational 
system of the city. The original training 
school was conducted for twelve years at the 
old German-English school building on Mary- 
land street, just east of Delaware street. 

In the field of practical philanthropy the 
aid and influence of Mr. Jletzger have been 
potent in an earnest and unassuming way, and 
among the more noteworthy causes in which he 



HISTOKY OF GKEATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



723 



has thus been enlisted is that of the Indianapo- 
lis Boys' Club Association, which was estab- 
lished for , boys of limited opportunities and 
which now has a well equipped club house at 
the corner of South Meridian street and Mad- 
ison avenue. The work of the noble institution 
was initiated in 1892, and he was one of the 
organizers. The generous support accorded by 
its promoters and other representative citizens 
of Indianapolis have made it a wonderful power 
for good in providing opportunities for news- 
boys and other boys who would otherwise be 
denied such advantages. Mr. Metzger has been 
an active and enthusiastic supporter of and 
worker in this association, of whose finance 
committee he is chairman, and of which Hon. 
Thomas E. JMarshall, governor of the state, is 
president. 

Mr. Metzger was one of the charter mem- 
bers of the Commercial Club, which has stood 
representative of high civic ideals and done 
much to further the industrial and commer- 
cial upbuilding of Indianapolis, and he was 
a member of the directorate of this organiza- 
tion during the first eight years of its exist- 
ence, afterwards becoming vice-president. He 
is now chairman of its Committee on Educa- 
tion, as well as a member of the Committee 
for Civic Improvement and the Committee on 
Charity Organizations, and is a valued mem- 
ber also of the Board of Trade, of whose board 
of governors he was a valued member for some 
time. He is a member of the Columbia Club 
and the German House, of whose Building 
and Savings institution he has been president 
for fifteen (15) years. 

On the 6th day of February,- 1892, Mr. Metz- 
ger was married to Miss Frances Mueller, of 
New Ulm, Minnesota, who was the first 
supervisor of physical training in the public 
schools of Indianapolis, an office which she 
conducted with eminent success a number 
of years. She was born in Minnesota 
and is a daughter of Jacob Mueller 
and Frances (Schuetze) Mueller, the lat- 
ter of whom is still living. The four children 
of this union are: Margaret, Alexander, Nor- 
man and Louise. Mr. and Mrs. Metzger are 
distinctively prominent and popular in con- 
nection with the best social activities of the 
capital city, and their attractive home is 
known for its gracious hospitality. Mrs. Metz- 
ger has been prominently and earnestly iden- 
tified with the principal charitable enterprises 
of Indianapolis, and for many years she" was 
incumbent of the olHce of president of the 
German Ladies' Aid Society, whose work has 
been of the most beneficent and kindly order. 

Vol. II— C 



George Wolf. This well known and dis- 
linctivelj' popular citizen has maintained his 
home in Indianapolis for more than thirty- 
five years, having come here when a youth 
and having, through his own efforts, gained 
prestige as one of the substantial business 
men of the capital city. He has served in 
offices of public trust, has ever been loyal 
to the interests of his home city, and has 
reason to be proud of the .success he has 
achieved in the land to which he came from 
his German fatherland w^hen eighteen years 
of age. He is now engaged in the real estate, 
loan and insurance business, having his office 
headquarters at 221 and 222 Lenieke build- 
ing. 

George Wolf was born in Dietkirchen, Prov- 
ince of Hessen-Nassau, Germany, on the 8th 
of July, 1855, and is a son of John and Mary 
(Roos) Wolf, of whose thirteen children he 
was the fourth in order of birth; of the 
number, eight are now living, four being resi- 
dents of the United States. The father was a 
well-to-do farmer and worthy citizen and 
passed his entire life in Germany, where his 
venerable widow still maintains her home. 
The subject of this sketch" was afforded the 
advantages of the excellent schools of his na- 
tive province and was graduated in the gym- 
nasium, corresponding to the American high 
school, at the age of eighteen years. He soon 
afterward, in 1873. set forth to win for him- 
self a position of independence in America, 
which has gained much from the element 
contributed to its social fabric by the great 
empire of Germany. He first located in the 
City of Philadelphia, where he remained near- 
ly two years, within which he secured a good 
command of the English language, and he 
then, in 1875, came to Indianapolis, which 
city has represented his home during prac- 
tically the entire intervening period, marked 
by steady and substantial progress on his 
part. Upon his arrival in the Indiana capital 
Mr. "VVolf secured employment as clerk in a 
e:rocery store, and after a period of about 
five years he engaged in the grocery business 
on his own responsibility, his store having 
been located at No. 225 South Illinois street. 
He continued to be identified with this line 
of enterprise until 1887, when he sold his 
business and assumed a clerical position in 
the office of the county auditor. He was 
thus engaged until 1890, when recognition of 
his ability and effective service was accorded 
by his election to the office of city and town- 
ship assessor. He gave him.self faithfully, 
conscientiously and with marked discrimina- 



724 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



tion to the work of this position and con- 
tinued incumbent of the ofRce for a period of 
live years, within which he gained an intimate 
and exact knowled<re of real estate values, es- 
pecially in the immediate field of his jurisdic- 
tion. 

After retiring from the office of assessor, in 
1895, Mr. Wolf turned his attention to the 
real estate, loan and insurance business, and 
he has built up a substantial business in 
those lines. His knowledge of values has 
brought his services into requisition in con- 
nection with the appraising of real estate and 
other advisorj' interests, and he is well and 
favorably known in local business circles, as 
well as those of social order, the while it may 
be said that his coterie of friends is equal in 
number to that of his acquaintances. 

'J'aking a loj'al interest in all that concerns 
his home city, Jlr. Wolf keeps in touch with 
public affairs, and his political allegiance is 
given to the Democratic party. He is a mem- 
ber of the Commercial Club, with which he 
has been identified for nearly two score of 
years, and is also a valued member of the 
Indianapolis Board of Trade and the Indiana 
Democratic Club. He and his wife are com- 
municants of the Catholic Church, being mem- 
bers of St. Mary's parish, and he also holds 
membership in St. Joseph's Aid Society and 
is actively affiliated with the Knights of Co- 
lumbus. 

In St. Mary's Church, this city, on the 7th 
of January, 1880, was solemnized the mar- 
riage of Mr. Wolf to Miss Josephine Itten- 
bach, a daughter of the late Gerhard Itten- 
bach, who was a prominent business man of 
Indianapolis. Mr. and Mrs. Wolf became the 
parents of twelve children, of whom nine are 
living. 

James M. Hume. In a review of the ca- 
reers of the* pioneer business men of Indian- 
apolis, it is proper that recognition be given 
James Jladison Hume, who was a conspicu- 
ous figure in the early business history of the 
city. He was a representative figure in busi- 
ness life for many years and gained success 
through his own well directed efforts. Pro- 
gressive and loyal in both private and public 
affairs, he proved a valuable citizen, and he 
so directed his course as to retain at all times 
the confidence and esteem of his fellow men, 
while through his influence and his business 
operations he contributed materially to the 
progress and prestige of the city which was 
so long his home and the center of his in- 
terests. 

James Madison Hume, a descendant of one 
of the pioneer families nf Indiana, was born 
on a farm in Dearborn County, in this state, 



on the 1st of October, 1830, and was a son 
of Rev. Madison and Eliza (Bowers) Hume, 
both of whom were Kentuckians. The geneal- 
ogy is traced back to Scottish origin, and the 
family was one of distinction and prominence, 
belonging to the historic Scottish house of 
Wedderburn. One of his descendants, a Cove- 
nanter, came to America in the colonial days 
and settled in Lancaster County, Pennsyl- 
vania. So intense,' although bigoted, was his 
religious zeal that he changed his name to 
Hiunes, to avoid the possibility of being asso- 
ciated by people in any way with Hume, the 
English historian, who was an infidel. 

Rev. Madison Hume came to Indiana in 
the early pioneer days and was one of those 
who settled in what was then the wilds of 
Dearborn County, where he entered land and 
began its reclamation. He was a prominent 
and honored citizen of that section of the 
state, where he not only tilled the soil but 
also labored with all of zeal and consecration 
as a clergyman of the Baptist Church. There 
were but few churches in that region at the 
time he was thus laboring, and in pursuit of 
his godly calling he traveled on horseback 
from village to village and to remote settle- 
ments, holding services in school houses or 
such other buildings as were available for the 
purpose. In this manner he covered a wide 
area, and he was long one of the prominent 
and revered ministers of the gospel in central 
Indiana. In 1833 he sold his property in 
Dearborn County and removed to Marion 
County, purchasing a small farm near the 
village of Augusta, seven miles north of In- 
dianapolis. There he continued to live until 
I860, when he sold the farm and removed 
to Indianapolis. Here he died in 1864, at his 
residence on Capitol avenue, near Thirteenth 
street. His widow later sold this property 
to the school board and the site is now occu- 
pied by a large brick school house. His 
widow purchased a new home, on North Illi- 
nois street near Sixteenth street and she died 
there on the 25th of August, 1899, at the 
venerable age of ninety years, having survived 
her honored husband by nearly two score 
years. 

James M. Hume, the subject of this memoir, 
was about three years of age when his family 
removed from Dearborn County to the new 
home in Marion County. Here he grew to 
maturity under the sturdy discipline of the 
farm, in the meanwhile attending to winter 
terms of school in the primitive log school 
house in the vicinitj'. This meager prelim- 
inary training proved ample foundation upon 
which to rear the substantial superstructure 
of definite knowledge and commanding busi- 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



ness ability which later marked the man. 
His intellectual powers were broadened and 
matured by active association with men and 
affairs as well as by well ordered reading of 
good books and periodicals of the day. Am- 
bitious and self-reliant, l\Ir. Hume early de- 
termined to seek a broader field of endeavor 
than that offered by the farm. In 1849 he 
came to Indianapolis, where he was destined 
to attain a eommandiny place as a merchant 
of progressive ideas and great executive abil- 
ity and as a citizen ever worthy of unquali- 
fied confidence and esteem. From a previ- 
ously published review of his business career 
are taken, with but slight change, the follow- 
ing statements: 

"That he did not mistake his abilities or 
predilections was proved by the result of his 
venture in the world of trade. He first en- 
tered the merchant-tailoring establishment of 
James Hall, in the capacity of clerk, and six 
months later, so completely had Mr. Hume 
won his employer's Confidence that he was 
sent by Mr. Hall to Pendleton, in this state, 
to take charge of a shoe store there, a speedy 
recognition of worth and integrity as well as 
a bestowal of responsibility not usually con- 
ferred on one of his age at the time. He 
remained in Pendleton for a few months, 
until the store was closed out. Having ac- 
quired a taste for the drygoods business, Mr. 
Hume, in 1852, made arrangements to enter 
the employ of Horace A. Fletcher, who was 
then conducting an extensive business as 
dealer in dry goods, carpets and wall paper. 
The first year he received only twenty-five 
dollars in money for his services, but in 1856, 
with what he had saved, he was able to pur- 
chase an interest in the business and assumed 
charge of the establishment, doing the prin- 
cipal part of the buying. The business was 
now conducted under the firm name of H. A. 
Fletcher & Company. In 1858 Edgar N. 
Lord, of Roxbury, Massachusetts, purchased 
an interest in the concern, which was then 
removed to No. 10 East Wa.shington street, 
where for a time it was located in a build- 
ing adjoining the one now occupied by the 
Indianapolis News. In 1859, James M. Ray 
began the erection on this ground for the 
Trade Palace, which was completed in the 
following year, and H. A. Fletcher & Com- 
pany had the foresight to lease the first floor 
of the building, thus obtaining a store room 
thirty-five feet wide by on^ hundred feet in 
depth ; the three upper floors of the building 
were sixty feet deep. It wa.s thought by 
many that the growth of their trade would 
not justify the firm's occupancy of what was 
then considered extensive quarters, but the 



partners were willing to take the risk, and 
time proved that their judgment was not at 
fault. In 1863, Mr. Fletcher, wishing to re- 
tire, sold his interest in the business to his 
partners, who, in the fall of that year, admit- 
ted LaFayette Adams into the concern, whose 
title thereupon became Hume, Lord & Com- 
pany. In 1864, because of the failing health, 
Mr. Lord sold his interest to his partners, and 
retired from the firm, and for another year 
the business was continued under the title of 
Hume & Adams. In 1865 they disposed of 
their drygoods stock to engage in a carpet, 
wall-paper and window-shade business upon 
an extensive scale, both wholesale and retail, 
and about the same time Edgar J. Foster en- 
tered the firm, which then assumed the name 
of Hume, Adams & Company. In 1867, so 
steadily had their business increased that they 
were able to purchase the Trade Palace, which 
under their enterprising management was 
speedily enlarged to four times its original 
capacity. The first floor was rented to N. R. 
Smith & Co., drygoods merchants, and the 
second floor reseiwed for their own use. By 
1870 the further extension of the business re- 
quired the admission of an office partner, and 
Arthur L. Wright, former county treasurer, 
became a member of the firm, whose title was 
later changed to Adams, IMansur & Company. 
Mr. Hume had accumulated a competency 
through his honorable and enterprising opera- 
tions in the local business field, and he con- 
tinued to be actively identified with the busi- 
ness mentioned until 1877; at this time the 
firm met financial reverses, after which Mr. 
Hume lived virtually retired until his death. 
In 1889 he and his wife removed to Cali- 
fornia, where they resided until 1893, when 
they returned to Indianapolis, and lived at 
3213 North Illinois, where Mr. Hume passed 
the remainder of his life. He died on the 
fifth of l\larch, 1899, secure in the unqualified 
esteem of all who knew him. 

The career of James iM. Hume is typical 
of the best there is in American life, and 
his reputation and' unsullied character proved 
valuable in connection with business affairs 
in the capital city. He carried into business 
life the deportment and courtesy of the old 
school gentleman, which is now rapidly be- 
coming a tradition. He was one of the world's 
army of workers and no man had a greater 
respect for the dignity and value of honest 
toil. His helpfulness was exerted in a quiet 
and unassuming way and through diverse 
channels. He was full of frenerous impulses 
and as a citizen he was loyal, liberal and 
public-spirited. IMnch intellectual and moral 
force was his. TTo used it for the benefit of 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



his fellow-iin'ii. lie was essentially a busi- 
ness man and had no ambition for the prefer- 
ments of politics, though he was a stalwart 
supporter of the principles and policies of the 
Kepublieau party. He was a consistent mem- 
ber of the Baptist Church, in whose faith he 
was reared, and he was liberal in the support 
of all church work in the community. 

In December, 1867, James M. Hume mar- 
ried Jlary Elizabeth Culley, who is the daugh- 
ter of tiie late David V. Culley, who was 
long a prominent and influential citizen of 
Indianapolis. The only child of this union 
is George E. Hume, of whom mention is made 
in following paragraphs. Mrs. Hume still 
maintains her home in Indianapolis, is a mem- 
ber of the Second Presbyterian Church and 
has long held an unassailable position in the 
.social life of the city in which her life has 
been passed. 

George E. Hume is well upholding, both 
as a citizen and as a business man, the pres- 
tige of the name which he bears. He was 
born on the 19th of March, 1869, in Indianap- 
olis, and here he secured his education in the 
public schools. In 1885, he entered the Bos- 
ton Latin School, from which he graduated 
in 1889. He entered Harvard University, 
and graduated as a member of the class of 
1893, with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. 
He then returned to his home and entered the 
Indianapolis Law School, from which he duly 
received his degree of Bachelor of Laws in 
1895, in which year he was admitted to the 
bar. After graduation, he continued his law 
studies for a year in the offices of Butler, 
Snow & Butler, and Holtzman & Leathers, in 
Indianapolis. He then entered into partner- 
ship with Edward E. Gates, under the firm 
name of Gates & Hume, and they continued 
to be thus associated in the practice of law 
until 1899. In the last year mentioned he 
practically retired from the practice of the 
■aw to assume the office of secretarj' and 
treasurer of the Indiana Title Guaranty & 
Loan Company, to which position he was 
elected at the time of the organization and in- 
corporation of this institution. Since 1904, 
he has also served as treasurer of the Amer- 
ican Central Life Insurance Company, of In- 
dianapolis, representing another of the ably 
managed and financially solid institutions that 
are contributing so materially to the prece- 
dence of the fair capital city of the Hoosier 
state. 

Like his honored father. Mr. Hume is lib- 
eral and progressive in his attitude as a citi- 
zen and he takes a deej) interest in all that 
touches the advancement and prosperity of 
his native city, where lie is identified with 



many representative civic and social organi- 
zations. He is a stalwart supporter of the 
principles and policies of the Republican 
party. Genial and companionable, his circle 
of friends is circumscribed only by that of 
his acquaintances and he is one of the popu- 
lar young business men of Indianapolis, be- 
sides remaining a member of its bar. 

On the 16th day of November. 1898, :\Ir. 
Hume married Lucy Fitzhugh Holliday, who 
was born and reared in Indianapolis and who 
is the daughter of William Jacquelin Hi'lli- 
day and Lucy (Redd) Holliday, the former 
a cousin of Governor Holliday of Virginia, 
and the latter a lineal descendant of the 
great patriot, Patrick Henry. ^\v. and Mrs. 
Hume have two sons— AVilliam ilansur and 
Jacquelin Holliday. 

Alkxaxdkr M. Stewart. A representative 
business man and most popular citizen of the 
fair capital citv of Indiana is Alexander il. 
Stewart, who is a native son of this common- 
wealth, where his entire life has been passed, 
and who has been engaged in the music trade 
for nearly thirty years, representing the major 
))ortion of his active career. He has been a 
resident of Indianapolis since 1869 and his 
popularity is based upon his generous attri- 
butes of character and his signal rectitude and 
fairness as a business man. 

Mr. Stewart was born in the city of Terre 
Haute, Indiana, on the -Ith of JIarch, ISOT. 
and is a scion of one of the old and distin- 
guished families of the state, with whose an- 
nals the name has been identified since the 
early pioneer epoch in the history of this com- 
monwealth. He is the onlv child of Colonel 
Robert R. and Plora (Sullivan) Stewart. His 
father was born and reared in Indiana, and 
he represented this state with distinction as 
a soldier in the Mexican War, in whicii he 
held the rank of lieutenant, and when the 
dark cloud of Civil War cast its grewsonie 
pall over the national horizon this sterling 
patriot was among the first to tender his serv- 
ices in defense of the Tnion. He was matle 
colonel of the Eleventh Indiana Cavalry, with 
which he participated in numerous cngai;e- 
ments prior to the time when he met the dire 
fortunes of war, in being captured by the 
Mvemy, by whom be was incarcerated in loath- 
some old Libby prison, in Richmond, A'irginia. 
where he was held for a period of seven months. 
His health became seriouslv impaired throuuh 
the ])rivations and other hardships whicli he 
endured in this historic pri,«on, and he died 
a few vears after the close of the great conflict 
through which the integrity of the nation was 
perpetuated. His widow subsequently beenine 
the wife nf Kmil Wulschnor. of Indianniiolis. 




^^"^^^^^^io^-clL^ J^/J^fez^ 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



727 



who died April 9, lOOO. She was prominent 
in religious and charitable work and in the 
.<inial activities of the community. She was 
chairman of the board of trustees of the In- 
diana Orphans' Home Association. She was 
born and reared in the capital city, where her 
father, Esquire William Sullivan, was a prom- 
inent and influential citizen. She died in 
Rome, Italy, April 14, 1909. 

Alexander M. Stewart was about three j-ears 
of age at the time of his father's death, and 
soon thereafter his luother came to Indian- 
apolis, in which city he was reared to man- 
hood and to whose public schools he is in- 
debted for his early educational discipline. 
His stepfather was here engaged in the music 
business for many years, and with this line 
of enterprise Mr. Stewart has been identified 
from his youth to the present time. His finely 
equipped establishment is considered the lead- 
ing music house of the state and is eligibly 
located on Pennsylvania street, in the main 
building, especially built for this firm. Here 
is retained a large and representative patron- 
age and the establishment is a favored head- 
quarters for the leading musicians of the city, 
as w^ll as for other patrons of all classes. 

In connection with his music business Mr. 
Stewart has for a number of years had large 
real estate interests in Indianapolis, and in 
this line he has made many important trans- 
actions and through the same advanced the 
development of the city. He is essentially 
and emphatically progressive and public 
spirited as a citizen and none has shown more 
satisfaction in witaessing and aiding in the 
development of the "Greater Indianapolis." 
In politics he maintains an independent atti- 
tude, and he is identified with the Columbia 
Club, the German House and the Indianapolis 
IMaennerchor, and the Loyal Ijegion. In the 
Masonic fraternity he has completed the circle 
of the Scottish Rite body, in which latter he 
has attained the Ihirtv-second degree, besides 
which he is affiliated with the allied organiza- 
tion, the Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles 
of the Mvstic Shrine. 

On the 16th of November, 1893, -Mr. Stew- 
art was united in marriage to Miss Georgia 
Toms, of St. Louis, Missouri, and she was sum- 
moned to the life eternal on the 9th of August, 
]00(i, being survived by two sons. — George Ed- 
moud and James T. 

Julius C. "Walk, one of the veteran busi- 
ness men and highly honored citizens of In- 
dianapolis, figures as the siibject of this brief 
sketch, and in addition to his prestige in the 
field of business in which he has so long en- 
caged his energies, further interest attaches 
to his career from the fact that he is a native 



son of the Indiana capital, which has repre- 
sented his home from the time of his birth. 
He is known as a leal and loyal citizen and 
as one who has witnessed and contributed to 
the upbuilding of the great industrial and 
commercial city that may well be designated 
"Greater Indianapolis"'. He has gained suc- 
cess along normal and legitimate lines of 
business and is now the head of one of the 
oldest and largest retail jewelry concerns in 
the city and one that has ever secured a pat- 
ronage of essentially representative order, its 
fine trade being based upon fair and honor- 
able dealings and careful attention to the 
demands of the appreciative patronage. The 
enterprise is now conducted under the firm 
name of Julius C. Walk & Son, and the finely 
appointed and equipped establishment is lo- 
cated at No. 10 East Washington street. 

The house in which Mr. Walk was born 
was located on the corner of ^Meridian and 
Washington streets, Indianapolis, which was 
then a small city, and the date of his nativity 
was January 4, 1840. He is a son of Louis 
and Emma (lohn') Walk, the former of whom 
was born in AVurtemburg, Germany, in the 
year 1806, and the latter of whom was born 
in Nord Hansen, Prussia, on the 18th of Feb- 
ruary. 1809. The pardnts were reared and 
educated in their fatherland and came alone 
to America when j-oung. Their acquaint- 
anceship was formed in the United States 
and on the 16th of April, 1838, their mar- 
riage -was solemnized, in New York City. The 
father became a naturalized citizen of the 
land of his adoption on the 28th of July, 1842, 
in Indianapolis, and his certificate of citizen- 
ship, now in the posses.sion of the subject of 
this sketch, was signed by Robert B. Duncan, 
who was at that time clerk of Marion County. 
Louis Walk came with his young wife to 
Indianapolis in 1839. making: the trip from 
Philadelphia to Cincinnati and thence on to 
the little capital city of the Hoosier state. 
They passed the residxie of their long and 
useful lives in Indianapolis, where they were 
recognized as folk of sterling worth of char- 
acter and where thej^ were held in unqualified 
confidence and respect by all who knew them. 
They were devout members of the Lutheran 
and Catholic Churches and their lives, hon- 
est and unpretentious, were marked by kindly 
deeds and generous interest in the welfare of 
those about them. The honored father was 
summoned to his reward on the 9th of May, 
1875, and his cherished and devoted wife en- 
tered into eternal rest on the 27th of August, 
1889. They became the parents of three chil- 
dren, namely: Louise, who is the widow of 
Julius ifannfeld and still maintains her home 



:-?8 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



in Indianapolis; Julius C, who is the imme- 
diate subject of this sketch; and Carl, who 
died in 1903, leaving a widow, two sons and 
one daughter; he was a representative busi- 
ness man and honored citizen of Indianapolis, 
where his family still reside. Louis Walk 
was a shoemaker by trade and his entire ac- 
tive career was one of active identification 
with the same. For many years he conducted 
a custom boot and shoe shop in Indianapolis, 
and his distinctive skill and genial personality 
gained to him a large patronage from the 
best class of citizens. 

Julius C. Walk was reared to maturity in 
the Indiana capital and here he received a 
good common-school education. In 1855 he 
entered upon an apprenticeship to the trade 
of silversmith and goldsmith and watchmaker, 
completing a service of four years and be- 
coming a skilled artisan. He was employed at 
his trade in local establishments until 1877, 
when he initiated his independent career in 
the jewelry business. He formed a partner- 
ship with James N. Mayhew and Wheeloek P. 
Bingham, under the firm name of Bingham, 
Walk & Mayhew, and they opened their mod- 
est establishment at No. 12 East Washington 
street. This partnership alliance remained 
unchanged for a period of five years, at the 
expiration of which Mr. ^layhew retired, and 
thereafter the firm of Bingham & Walk contin- 
ued the business until the death of Mr. Bing- 
ham, in 1889. In 1892 Mr. Walk purchased 
of Mrs. Bingham the interest of his former 
partner and valued friend, and he then ad- 
mitted to partnership his only son, Carl F. 
Walk, since which time the business has been 
continued under the title of Julius C. Walk 
& Son. Thus for more than thirty .vears has 
the honored subject of this sketch been iden- 
tified in an independent way with the one 
line of enterprise in the City of Indianapolis, 
and his course has been marked by that im- 
pregnable integrity of purpose, that careful 
consideration of the requirements of his 
patrons, and that generous and kindly atti- 
tude that have gained to him a secure place 
as one of the representative business men of 
the capital city and as erne of its popular and 
valued citizens. 

In polities Mi-. AValk, though never an 
aspirant for office, has ever shown a loyal in- 
terest in all that has tended to enhance the 
civic and material prosperity and progress of 
his native city. His wife holds membership in 
the Plymouth Church, and he is identified 
with variou.s social and fraternal organiza- 
tions, including the ^lasonic fraternity, with 
which he has be(Mi affiliated since 1865. He 
has membership in Ancient Landmarks Lodge 



Xo. 319, Free & Accepted ^Masons; Keystone 
Chapter No. 6, Royal Arch Masons; and 
Raper Commandery No. 1, Knights Temp- 
lars, with which fine ehivalric body he has 
been identified since 1872. He has also at- 
tained to the thirty-second degree in the An- 
cient Accepted Scottish Rite Masonry, and 
since 1884 has been a member of Mural 
Temple, Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles 
(if the ]\Iystie Shrine. 

On the 30th of April, 18G8, was solemnized 
the marriage of Mr. Walk to Miss Eleanora 
T. E. Werbe, who was born and reared in 
Indianapolis and who is a daughter of the 
late Ferdinand L. Werbe, who was for many 
years engaged in the merchandise business in 
this city. Mr. and Mrs. Walk have three 
children, namely, Julia, Carl and Freda. 
Freda is the wife of Dr. Reginald Garstrong; 
Carl married Matilda Brink, daughter of 
Christian Brink, one time recorder of [Marion 
County. 

Daniel Yandes. A publication of this na- 
ture exercises its most important function 
when it takes cognizance, through proper me- 
morial tribute, of the life and labors of so 
distinguished a citizen as was Daniel Yandes. 
who was a pioneer of pioneers in the Indiana 
capital, where he took up his abode in 1821 
and where he continued to reside until his 
death, in the fullness of years and well earned 
honors, on the 10th of June, 1878, at which 
time he was eighty-five years and five months 
of age. He ever stood exponent of the most 
leal and loyal citizenship and was a gracious, 
noble personality whose memory will be long 
cherished and venerated in the city to whose 
civic and material progress he contributed in 
most generous measure. A man of great 
business capacity and of the highest prin- 
ciples of integrity and honor, he made his in- 
fiuence felt along divei-s lines and he was long 
a leader in the promotion of legitimate in- 
diistrial and semi-public enterprises which 
conserved the general welfare of the city and 
state of his adoption. 

Daniel Yandes was born in Fayette Coun- 
ty, Pennsylvania, in Janua^^^ 1793, and was 
a son of Simon and Anna Catherine (Rider) 
Yandes, both of whom were natives of Ger- 
many. The father owned and operated a 
farm near the Monongahela River, west of 
Fniontown, and there the two sons, Daniel 
and Simon, Jr., were reared to maturity, re- 
ceiving such advantages as were afforded in 
the common schools of the locality and period. 
Both of the son.s early began to assist in the 
work of the home farm, aiding in its reclama- 
tion from the forest wilds. Both manifested 
their lovallv when the War. of 1812 was iu 



HISTOEY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



T'39 



progress, and both served under Uen. William 
Henry Harrison in this second struggle with 
England, having been on duty with the troops 
in northern Ohio, but never having been 
called into active eontlict during their six 
months' term of service. In 1814, when the 
national capital was made the point of attack 
on the part of the British the two youthful 
patriots again enlisted, and when but twenty- 
one years of age Daniel Yandes was elected 
major of his regiment, but his connuand was 
not called into action. In the following year 
was solemnized his marriage to ;\Iiss Anna 
AVilson, eldest daughter of James and Mary 
(Rabb) Wilson. Her father was a represen- 
tative farmer and influential citizen of Fay- 
ette county, where he served for a number of 
years as a magistrate. The Wilson family 
was of Scotch-Irish and the Rabb family of 
Scotch-English lineage, and both held to the 
faith of the Presbyterian Church, of which 
Mrs. Yandes was a devoted member during 
her entire life. She was a woman of gentle 
and gracious character and proved a veritable 
helpmeet to her husband. Her paternal 
grandfather, Alexander Wilson, was born in 
1727 and finally removed from Lancaster 
Couhty, Pennsylvania, to Fayette County, 
that state, where his death occurred in the 
year 1815. 

After his marriage Daniel Yandes engaged 
in coal mining and also the operating of a 
flour mill. In 1817 occurred the death of his 
honored father, who was eighty-four yeai"S of 
age at the time, and in the following year 
he set forth for Indiana, in company with his 
widowed mother, his wife and their two chil- 
dren, making the trip down the Ohio River 
to Cincinnati and proceeding thence to Fay- 
ette County, Indiana, where he secured a tract 
of heavily timbered land, near the present 
thriving town of Connersville. He became 
one of the pioneer farmers of that section 
of the state, where he continued to reside un- 
til 1821, when he removed to the little town 
of Indianapolis, which had but recently been 
designated as the capital of the state. He 
thereafter maintained his home in Indian- 
apolis and here centered his interests until 
his death, which occurred in June, 1878, as 
already noted in this context. His first place 
of abode in the capital city was a log cabin 
which he erected near the southwest corner 
of Washington and Alabama streets, opposite 
the court-house square. In 1823 he built a 
frame house of three rooms, in the same lo- 
cality, and this continued to be the family 
domicile until 1831, when he erected a two- 
story brick residence west of and contiguous 
to the present building of the State Life In- 



siu'anee Company. In 1837 he was the owner 
of an acre of ground now occupied by the 
fine government building, and thereon he 
built a large but not ornate brick house of 
two stories, which was the family home there- 
after until 1863, when the property was sold 
to the First Presbyterian Church, whose edi- 
fice occupied the site until the .same was sold 
to the government, nearly half a century 
later. In this home his cherished and devoted 
wife died in 1851, and he ever remained true 
to her memory, showing- no desire to contract 
a second marriage. 

When Mr. Yandes arrived in Indianapolis 
he had a capital of four thousand dollars, and 
the financial standards of the time may be 
realized when it is stated that this amount 
was sufficient to constitute the largest cap- 
italist of the embryonic city during the en- 
suing decade. Concerning him the following 
pertinent statements have been written: "He 
was, in common witli pioneers generally, a 
man of rugged health, and was hopeful, con- 
fiding and enterprising. He was fond of 
building mills and manufactories and of in- 
troducing other improvements. On his ar- 
rival in Indianapolis he was associated with 
his brother-in-law in the" erection of a saw 
and grist mill on the ba.vou southwest of the 
city where the McCarty land now is, the dam 
being built across White River at the head of 
the island, which was opposite the old ceme- 
tery. This is said to have been the first mill 
erected on the land purchased by the state 
for the new capital. About 1823 "the firm of 
Yandes & Wilkins established the first tan- 
nery in the county, and they continued to 
be associated in that line of business for 
about thirty years. 'I'hc active partner was 
John Wilkins, a man well known for his un- 
common merits. Afterward Daniel Yandes 
continued the same business M'ith his nephew, 
Lafayette Yandes. After the death of the 
latter he formed another partnership, with 
his nephew, Daniel Yandes, Jr., and James 
C. Parmalee, and this firm conducted an ex- 
tensive tannery in Brown County and a leath- 
er store in Indianapolis. Ah(mt the year 1825 
he became a partner of Franklin Merrill, 
brother of Samuel Merrill, in a store, which, 
like others of the pioneer days in Indianap- 
olis, contained a miscellaneous assortment of 
goods, more or less extensive, including dry- 
<roods, groceries, queensware, hardware, hats, 
boots and shoes, etc. About 1831 he became 
the partner of Edward T. Porter, and the 
store of the firm of Yandes & Porter was in 
a brick building on the site of the present 
State Life Insurance Compan.v. At nearly 
the same time ^fi-. Yandes started Joseph 



730 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



Sloan in business as a merchant at Coving- 
ton, Indiana, and he continued for several 
years a member of the firm thus formed. In 
1833 he and Samuel Merrill, treasurer of the 
state, dug a race along Fall Creek and built 
a grist-mill, a saw-mill and the first cotton- 
spinning factory in that region. A few years 
afterward he and William Sheets, who had 
shortly before been secretary of state, built 
on the canal west of the state-house grounds 
the first paper-mill in the county. About the 
same time he became the partner of Thomas 
M. Smith in a general store, and about 1838 
he was the partner of John F. Hill in an- 
other store, both of which were on the north 
side of Washington street, a little west of 
Pennsylvania street. In 1839, under great 
difficulties, he alone built at Lafayette, In- 
diana, a grist-mill, saw-mill and paper-mill, 
and opened with his son James a large store. 
While engaged in this enterprise the financial 
panic was precipitated upon the country and 
Mr. Yandes found himself involved heavily 
in debt, both as principal and indorser, at 
Indianapolis and Lafayette. While he en- 
joyed the good will of his creditors he did 
not command their entire confidence as to his 
solvency, and during the years 1839 to 1844 
judgments in Marion county accumulated 
against him to the amount of over twenty- 
two thousand dollars, under which conditions 
he sacrificed some of his most valuable prop- 
erty at much less than cost. At the same 
.time he was under protest at the bank in 
Lafayette. In due time, however, he paid the 
full amount of his debts, and it is a matter 
of legitimate pride that he and his children 
have always paid in full individual and all 
other indebtedness. About the year 1847 he 
and Thomas H. Sharpe built the College Hall, 
a brick building, which preceded the Fletcher 
bank and store building at the corner of 
Washington and Pennsylvania streets, and a 
few years later he erected another brick build- 
ing on Washington street, west of Pennsyl- 
vania street. In 1847 he built ten miles of 
the Madison railroad, which was completed 
about September of that year and which was 
the first railroad to enter Indianapolis. In 
the same year he was as.sociated in the build- 
ing of a grist mill at Franklin, this state. 
In 1852 he and Alfred Flarrison built thirty 
miles of the eastern end in Indiana of the 
Bellefontaine railroad. Previously to this 
time he had twice ventured successfully in 
sending large carsjoes of provisions by flat- 
boats from Indiana to New Orleans. About 
the year 18.^4, during the Kansas excitement, 
his desire for the freedom of that state im- 
pelled him to aid some young men to settle 



there, and he accompanied them to the west. 
About 1860 he joined Edward T. Sinker as 
partner in the Western Machine Works, of 
Indianapolis, with which industrial concern 
he continued to be identified for a number of 
years. 

"One of Mr. Yandes' most curious traits 
was the manifestation of unusual energy and 
labor for a series of years, until an enter- 
prise could be placed upon a solid basis, after 
which he evinced unusual indolence and in- 
attention to details for several years, until 
he became again enlisted in a new enterprise. 
As a consequence, after new enterprises were 
fairly started and tested he lost interest in 
them, and in a few years would usually sell 
his interest. He was senior partner and in 
most eases the capitalist in connection with 
the various business enterprises with which 
he thus concerned himself. Although he ma- 
tured his "plans carefully and patiently, he 
was nevertheless too fond of hazard." 

From the foregoing statements it will be 
seen that Mr. Yandes was a man of magnifi- 
cent initiative power and constructive ability, 
so that he was well fitted to become one of 
the founders and upbuilders of a city and 
state. He gave generously of his superb pow- 
ers in furthering the indu.strial and civic de- 
velopment of Indiana, and his name is one 
that merits a conspicuous place on the roll of 
those who have worthily conserved such 
progress. His integrity was of the most in- 
sistent and unswerving type and no shadow 
rests upon any portion of his career as an 
active business man and sterling citizen. He 
had his limitations, as do all, but he gave of 
the best of his great talents to the world 
and to aiding his fellow men. His wonder- 
ful vitality and personal enthxisiasm, together 
with too great confidence in the integrity and 
ability of others, caused him to be placed in 
his advanced age in a far less secure finan- 
cial status than was his just due. In this 
connection the following words have been 
written by one appreciative of his great worth 
and familiar with his career: "If his busi- 
ness career had terminated when he was 
seventy-five years of age he would have been 
a successful business man, but an undue fond- 
ness for enterprise and a hopeful enthusiasm, 
together with the fascination of the far west, 
an over-confidence in others, and the de- 
terioration incident to old age, with his un- 
willingness to be advised, resulted in disaster. 
He lost a considerable amount in mines in 
the west and a larsre sum in the Brazil fur- 
nace, at Bra.zil, Indiana, stripping him in ef- 
fect of his property when he was past the 
age of eighty years." 



HISTOKY or GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



]Mr. Yandes was a mau of impressive per- 
sonality, was broad of mental ken and had 
the characteristics which ever beget objective 
esteem, confidence and friendship. Viewing 
his life in its perspective none can fail to 
have appreciation of his great accomplish- 
ment at a time when such powers as his were 
at a premium, and he shonld ever be remem- 
bered as one of the noble, kindly and gen- 
erous pioneers of Indiana. 

In politics Mr. Yandes was originally an 
old-line Whig, but he gave his support to the 
Republican party from the time of its incep- 
tion until his death, and at the climacteric 
period leading up to the Civil War he was 
uncompromising in his advocacy of the aboli- 
tion of human slavery. He was essentially 
without ambition for public office, though he 
had the distinction of serving as the first 
treasurer of Marion County, and in 1838 re- 
ceived from Governor Noble the unsolicited ap- 
pointment as a member of the State Board of 
Internal Improvements, to which was assigned 
the control of the varied and extensive system 
of internal improvements provided for by 
legislative action in 18.36. His religious faith 
was primarily that represented by the Luth- 
eran Churph, but as Indianapolis had no or- 
ganization of this denomination in the early 
days, he identified himself with the Presby- 
terian Church. For a number of years he 
served as one of the first elders and trustees 
of the Second Presbyterian Church, to whoso 
upbuilding and support he contributed in 
generous measure. From 1823 onward for a 
period of more than twenty years his home 
was the leading hospice of the Presbyterian 
clergy, several of the most prominent of whom 
in the pioneer days of the state were enter- 
tained at his home for long periods. He was 
liberal in his contributions to normal chari- 
ties, as well as to the various departments of 
church work, and prior to 1865 his donations 
along these lines had reached a total of about 
sixty thousand dollars,— an amount whose ef- 
ficiency and value at that time would not be 
equalled by twice the sum today. 

Of the eleven children of the honored sub- 
.iect of this brief memoir five died young. 
His daughter Mary Y., who became the wife 
of Rev.' John T." Wheeler, died in 1852. 
James W., a successful business man of In- 
dianapolis, died in 1885. Simon, who was a 
representative citizen of Indianapolis, died 
on the 5th of October, 1903. Elizabeth, who 
became the wife of Joseph R. Robinson, died 
in IMay, 1904. The two surviving children 
are Catherine C, wife of Eliiah T. Fletcher, 
of Indianapolis, and Georse B., who likewise 
i-esides in the Indiana capital, which has rep- 



resented his home from the tinie of his birth. 
To the son Simon, a distinguished lawyer and 
honored citizen of Indianapolis, a special me- 
morial tribute is accorded on othei- pages of 
this work. 

Simon Yandes gave the best of an esseu- 
tiall.y strong, noble and loyal nature to the 
service of his fellow men; his life course 
was guided and governed by the highest prin- 
ciples of integrity and honor; he was hu- 
manity's friend and labored with all of zeal 
and devotion for the uplifting and aiding of 
his kindj he attained to marked distinction 
as a member of the bar of Indiana ; he cov- 
eted success but scorned to attain it except 
through industry and honest means; he ac- 
quired wealth without fraud or deceit, and, 
with a high sense of his stewardship, he dis- 
pensed it with well ordered generosity and 
benevolence. The results of hjs life are full 
of incentive and inspiration, and thus every 
publication touching upon the lives and deeds 
of those who have honored the City of In- 
dianapolis and the State of Indiana through 
their services should imperatively give con- 
sideration to this distinguished citizen, who 
passed practically his entire life in the cap- 
ital city, where he died on the 5th of Octo- 
ber, 1903, at the venerable age of eighty- 
seven years. In this brief * tribute to this 
man of great ability and exalted character 
recourse will be had to a previously pub- 
lished sketch of his career, as the same was 
written by one who knew him well and whose 
words are thus worthy of perpetuation. In 
said connection such paraphrase as seems ex- 
pedient will be used. Mr. Yandes was a son 
of Daniel Yandes, and as a memoir of the 
latter appears on other pages of this work 
it is not demanded that in the sketch at hand 
be entered further review of the family his- 
tory. 

Simon Yandes, one of the world's practical 
philanthropists, was born in Fayette County, 
Pennsylvania, on the 5th of Januaiy, 1816,— 
the year which marked the admission of In- 
diana to the Union. In 1818, when he was 
but two years of age, his parents removed 
from his native county to Fayette Count.v, 
Indiana, where they continued to reside un- 
til 1821, in Jlarch of which year they took 
up their abode in Indianapolis, which was 
laid out as a village in that year, after hav- 
ing been selected as the perpetual center of 
the state government. Thus from the age 
of five years until he was summoned to his 
reward, at a patriarchal as-e. he continued 
a resident of Indiana's capital, where he made 
his life count for good in all its relations 



rsx 



HISTOKY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



and where his memory is revered by all who 
knew him. 

In the little pioneer village from which has 
grown the City of Indianapolis, Simon Yandes 
was reared to maturity, and though the edu- 
cational advantages in the locality and period 
were somewhat meager, the boy and youth 
made the best possible use of such as were 
afforded, and in due time there matured one 
of the finest of intellectualities. His prelim- 
inary discipline was secured in a private 
school conducted by Ebenezer Sharpe, and 
eventually he was enabled to attend the Uni- 
versity of Indiana for one year. In 1838 he 
was matriculated in the law school of Har- 
vard College, in which he was graduated in 
the following year and from which he duly 
received his degree of Bachelor of Laws. 
There was a notable list of young men who 
were his fellow students in the law school, 
and among the number ma3' be mentioned 
William M. Evarts, E. Rock wood Hoar, 
Charles Devens, William W. Story, Charles 
T. Russell, Nathaniel Holmes, James Russell 
Lowell, Richard Henry Dana, Marcus Mor- 
ton, Rufus King and George V. Lothrop. 
Upon no less an authority than that of James 
Russell Lowell rests the early impression that 
Mr. Yandes was one of the best men in his 
class, and Judge Story, who was then one 
of the members of the faculty of the law 
school, predicted for him a successful future 
in his profession, besides which he mani- 
fested a deep personal interest in the young 
student, with whom he corresponded for .« 
eral years after the latter had left the law 
school. 

After his graduation Mr. Yandes returned 
to Indianapolis, where, in the same year, 1839, 
he became associated in practice with Fletcher 
& Butler, the leading law firm of the state 
at that time. With this firm he continued 
his alliance for a period of four years, at the 
expiration of which ^Ir. Fletcher retired 
therefrom. Later he conducted an individual 
practice for four years, and he then formed 
a partnership with Oliver H. Smith. The 
firm of Yandes & Smith thereafter held lead- 
ership at the bar of the state for four years, 
when Mr. Smith retired and Mr. Yandes as- 
sociated himself with Cyrus C. Hines, who 
later was long associated in practice with 
Gen. Benjamin Harrison. In 1858 Mr. Yan- 
des was a candidate for the office of asso- 
ciate .iustice of the supreme court of the 
state, but he met with defeat with the re- 
mainder of the party ticket. Just prior to 
the war of the rebellion he retired from the 
active practice of his profession, as he had 
Rcpumiilated what was then considered a for- 



tune, and thereafter he gave his attention 
principally to the management and super- 
vision of his business affairs. He gained 
prestige as one of the most able, versatile 
and distinguished members of the bar of In- 
diana and was identified with much important 
litigation in both the state and federal courts. 
Concerning his equipment for his profession 
one of his confreres has made the following 
pertinent and appreciative statements: "He 
was precise, but not technical ; logical but not 
coldly analytical; well read in the law, but 
not embarrassed by precedents. His moral 
integrity was a granite rock and his intel- 
lectual poise was akin to it. He did not 
have that large imaginative power that is 
needed for the making of an orator, but his 
full information, happy humor and power of 
accurate statement made him a strong speak- 
er. As a counselor he was at his best. His 
fair-mindedness, his wide foresight and his 
strong mental gi-asp qualified him to see all 
sides of the question, and to advise a course 
which always proved to be the right one. In- 
tellectuality was the dominant characteristic 
of his mind. His moral fiber was without a 
flaw or twist. His mold was the mold of 
Abraham Lincoln. Under an exterior of re- 
serve he kept an equable and generous na- 
ture and courageous spirit." 

As a business man Mr. Yandes showed 
great perspicacity and ability, and after his 
retirement from the active work of his pro- 
fession he made such investments and so hus- 
banded his resources as to accumulate money 
very rapidly. Concerning this phase of his 
career the following statements are worthy 
of reproduction: "In this he had a definite 
purpose to accomplish : this was to accumu- 
late a sufficient sum with which to accom- 
plish effective work in educational and re- 
ligious matters. He avoided, therefore, the 
frittering away of his accumulations in little 
matters. Some years ago he was asked by an 
acquaintance for a contribution of a small 
sum to a cause that one would have thought 
appealed to him. This he refused, saying 
that the man who was diffuse could not con- 
centrate; if he chose to aid by bits ever^'thing 
that appealed to him, he never could reach 
the position where he could do a thing gjcat- 
ly, and one or the other of these all men 
should do. In other words, there could be 
no diffusion and identification in small de- 
grees with eveiything, and concentration for 
the purpose of larger effort. He chose the 
latter as his course." 

Mr. Yandes held to the opinion that the 
averase man reached the ultimate of his pow- 
ers of accomplishment by the time he had 



HISTORY OF GEEATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



;5;3 



attained to the psalmist "s span of thi-ee score 
years and ten, and he ordered his own course 
in harmony with this conviction. Thus, when 
he reached the age of seventy years he be- 
gan to administer his large estate, "with 
great care, caution and critical examination". 
He considered himself in the light of a stew- 
ard and realized to the full the responsibili- 
ties which success and financial prosperity 
impose. Thus he matured his plans with all 
of care, that his benefactions might be cumu- 
lative in their results and that their influ- 
ence might continue in an ever widening 
angle of beneficence. "Modestly, quietly and 
even seeretlj', he began to make his gifts," 
says the writer from whose memoir previous 
quotations have been made, "and for fifteen 
years only those closest to him had any knowl- 
edge of his large benefactions. In the latter 
part of the spring of 1902 some of the facts 
concerning his gifts began to leak out. Curi- 
ously inaccurate and even untruthful state- 
ments were published in the newspapers,— 
caricatures of the man and of his doings. 
One of the results was that hundreds of beg- 
ging letters came to him from persons of 
whom he had never heard, and for objects of 
which he knew nothing. It vexed him much, 
and he was advised to put an end to this by 
a published statement of his donations, and 
thus let the people know that he had prac- 
tically given away his fortune. He ob.jected, 
on the ground that these were private and 
confidential matters. The pressure, however, 
became too great, and he dictated a short 
statement concerning his benefactions. This 
statement was as here noted: 'When I got 
to be seventy years old I thought I ought to 
be settling up my estate, and in the course 
of a few years thereafter I gave to Wabash 
College one hundred and fifty thousand dol- 
lars. Later I gave a small sum to another 
college; and I have given away, from time 
to time, about four hundred thousand dollars 
to church and charities. During the period 
from 1886, when I was seventy years old, Jo 
the present time I have given to relatives at 
least four hundred thousand dollars. Dur- 
ing this time I was accumulating what I 
could, and reducing my funds by gifts. And 
while I gave away eight hundred thousand 
dollars, or thereabouts, I have not had eight 
hundred thousand dollars at any one time. 
Among these donations I have given sixty 
thoiisand dollars to the Indiana Missionai^' 
Society; I have given at least one hundred 
thousand dollars to the foreign missionary 
societies, — Presbyterian, Methodist and Bap- 
tist. I have given forty or fifty thousand 



dollars to home missionary societies,— Pres- 
byterian, :\[ethodist and Baptist.' " 

A matter of gratifying comparison at this 
time was that made in the Boston Glube. 
which olfered the following comment: "An- 
drew Carnegie has given millions of dollars 
to found free public libraries, but he con- 
tinues to receive sufficient dividends from 
steel stock to pay for a first-class passage to 
his castle in Scotland. He has millions left 
in his possession. John D. Rockefeller \v,\< 
contributed magnificently to educational and 
religious institutions, yet never has he re- 
duced his principal or his income to a point 
where he would lose his power and prestige 
in the financial world. The Indianapolis law- 
yer, however, has, to all intents and purposes, 
stripped himself of an entire fortune, which 
he might today have counted in seven figures, 
and is content to live among his books, in a 
city block, on plain food, and clothed in rai- 
ment .just fine enough to be respectable. The 
Hoosier philanthropist practiced economy, as 
well as law, maintained his integrity, and has 
thereby been enabled to help the poor, edu- 
cate aspiring boys and girls of parents who 
are strangers to him, spreading the gospel at 
home and abroad, and, without forgetting his 
own worthy relatives, making the world bet- 
ter and brighter." 

Pure, constant and noble was the spiritual 
rtame that burned in and illumined the mor- 
tal tenement of Simon Yandes, and to the 
superficial observer can come but small ap- 
preciation of his intrinsic spirituality and 
profoundly religious nature. His faith was 
fortified by the deepest and most critical 
study, and the Christian verities were to him 
the matters of deepest concern among all thi; 
changes and chances of this mortal life. Here 
are the sentiments that have been expressed 
concerning this feature of his character: 
"No man with his intellectual vigor and the 
love of truth which marked him, could live 
long without inevitably being brought to inves- 
tigate the great moral laws governing life, and 
few men studied more critically and carefully 
than did he these matters. Few theologians 
had his learning on theology. Not many of 
the professors teaching the science of econom- 
ics has his attainments on the latter subject. 
Simon Yandes was a strong man,— a strong 
man intellectually, a strong man morally. 
Successful in all he undertook, at the bar he 
rose rapidly to the first place; in business in 
an inland town he accumulated a large for- 
tune; and as a philanthropist he acted so 
wisely and judiciously as to merit the ap- 
proval of all interested in the welfare of hu- 
manitv. " 



734 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



Though so significantly gifted in an intel- 
lectual way, Mv. Yandes had naught of in- 
teflectual bigotry or. intolerance. His very 
heart was attuned to sympathy, and to those 
who were granted appreciation of the man as 
he was must ever remain a feeling of rev- 
erence and admiration. His love for his 
mother continued one of the most ideal type 
throiighout the course of his long and use- 
ful life, and a more tender filial solicitude 
could not have been accorded while she was 
living, nor a. more loyal sentiment of affec- 
lion and veneration after she was summoned 
to the life eternal. It could not be wished to 
lift the veil that guarded the inmost sanctu- 
ary of the heart of the man, the good, the 
noble man, but reference to this dominating 
love of his gracious mother can not prove 
malapropos. 

Even this brief sketch, it is hoped, may 
serve to leave upon the mind of the reader 
some definite impress as to a worthy life and 
one that has its full measure of inspiration. 
The life itself signified more than mere words 
can express, and only may we say that favored 
weie those whose privilege it was to know 
and appreciate the great, true soul of 
Simon Yandes. ilr. Yandes never married, 
and his affections went forth in all of char- 
acteristic sympathy and loyalty to those of 
his own family, for whom he made every pos- 
sible provision and for whom his solicitude 
remained constant until the end of his life. 

Plixy W. BARTiroLOJtEW. Among those 
who have lent dignity and honor to the bench 
and bar of the State of Indiana a place of 
distinction must be accorded to Judge Bar- 
tholomew, who is now presiding on the bench 
of the superior court of Marion County and 
«ho has been a member of the bar of the cap- 
ital city of this commonwealth for more than 
forty years, — a period marked by large and 
distinguished accomplishment in his exacting 
profession and as a member of the judiciary. 
Ho is a scion of one of the old and honored 
families of our great American republic and 
by his life and services has well upheld the 
prestige of the name which he bears. As one 
of the representative legists and jurists of 
the state and as one of the leading members 
of his profession in the city of Indianapolis, 
Judge Bartholomew is most eon.?istently ac- 
corded recognition in this historical compila- 
tion. 

Pliny Webster Bartholomew was born at 
Cabotville. Hampden County, ^Iassaehu.=etts, 
on the 4th of August. 1840, and is a son of 
Harris and Betsey (^loore) Bartholomew, of 
whom more specific mention will be made in 



following paragraphs^ in which the genealog- 
ical line is traced. 

William Bartholomew, son of William and 
Friswede Bartholomew, of Burford, Englajid, 
figures as the original American progenitor 
of the family of which Judge Bartholomew is 
a member. This worthy ancestor was born in 
Burford, England, in 1602, and the date of 
his arrival in America was September 18, 1634. 
He forthwith took up his abode in. Boston, 
Massachusetts, and soon afterward was made 
a freeman of the colony. After a short in- 
terval he removed from Boston to Ipswich, 
having previously been granted the privilege 
of trading with visiting vessels. In 1635 he 
was granted several tracts of land near Ips- 
wich, Massachusetts, and he became one of the 
influential citizens of the Massachusetts col- 
ony. By popular election he retained for many 
years membership in the general court at Bos- 
ton, in which office he was prominently con- 
cerned in the historic trial of Mrs. Anna 
Hutchinson, who was banished on account of 
her offensive religious views. On the 11th of 
January, 1650, he and one other citizen re- 
ceived, under appointment, power and commis- 
sion to establish a public school in Ipswich, 
and he continued a member of this committee 
until his removal from the town. He and his 
brother Henry gave fifty shillings to estab- 
lish and pay the commissioners for the col- 
onies, and in 1606 he was elected trustee of 
■the county, besides which he held other offices 
of public trust. He finally returned to Bos- 
ton, but upon leaving Ipswich he donated to 
the town all the land that had previously been 
granted to him at that place, with the pro- 
vision or suggestion that the same was to be 
used by the people for a "pasture'". This land 
has been set aside in conformity with his gift 
and is now known as Bartholomew Hill. He 
died at Charlestown, Massachusetts, now a 
part of the city of Boston, on the 18th of Jan- 
uary, 1680, at the age of seventy-eight years. 
His active career was devoted to various kinds 
of mercantile enterprise, and the records still 
extant indicate that he was successful in busi- 
ness. He was a man of excellent mental equip- 
ment, having been graduated in a grammar 
school in his native town and having broad- 
ened his mental ken through the experiences 
and association of his long and useful life. 
In religion he was a "dissenter", and it is 
probable that at the time of his immigration 
to America he was a member of the Presby- 
terian church. In London, England, was 
solemnized his marriage to Anna Lord, sister 
of Robert Lord, who was one of the early set- 
tlers of Ipswich, 'Massachusetts. 

William Bartholomew (II). son of William 



HISTOEY OF GREATEK INDIANAPOLIS. 



aud Anna (Lord) Bartholomew, was born at 
Ipswich, JCassachiisetts, in 1640, and on the 
ITth of December, 16G3, he was united in 
marriage, at Roxburv, Massachusetts to Mar)', 
daughter of Captain Isaac and Elizabeth Jolin- 
son and gran ddaugl iter of John Jonson, who 
held the title of "sur\eyor of all ye king's 
armies in America". Both her grandfather 
and her father representetl Koxbiiry for hm 
years in the general court and they held higli 
social rank. Capt. Isaac -Johnson was killed 
on the 19th of December, 1075, in the famous 
Narragansett Fort battle witli the Indians, and 
he met his death while leading; his men over 
the bridge — a fallen tree — into the Indian 
stronghold. Mary (Johnson) Bartholomew 
was born April 24, 1G42, but the date of her 
death can not be found in existing records. 
As a young man William Bartholomew (II) 
learned the trade of carpenter, and in lt!(i2 
he gained his initial experience in connection 
with the grist-milling business, with which 
line of enterprise he was afterward identified 
on an extensive scale. He assisted his father 
'.n the operation of the mill owned by William 
Brown in Boston, and later aided his uncle, 
Henry Bartholomew, in the building of the 
old South mills in Salem, Massachusetts. Rec- 
ords show that in tlie latter part of June, 1663, 
he was staying about ten miles from Medfield, 
and it is conjectured that at the time he was 
a millwright at Robert Hensdale's mill. In 
that locality he participated in a wolf hunt and 
the company of which he was a member on 
this expedition had trouble with a party of 
Indians, who demanded and were refused 
liquor. His testimony, given on the 5th of 
April, 1664, was as here noted: "John Levin, 
aged twenty-four years or thereabout, & Will- 
iam Bartholomew, aged twenty-three, both 
sworne testiffie & sa^'e that beinge at a ffarm 
at Mr. Richard Parkers, about tenn niyles 
from .Medfield about the latter end of June 
last, did see a company of Indians come to 
ye fParm afforsaid and did request to have 
Liquors ifor saving of some wolves, but Na- 
thaniell Mntt wd not give ym any, but ten- 
dered ym a pecke of Come apeece to every 
ym ffor their paines in deliveringe the wolves, 
but they refused & were so earnest fEor Liquors 
that one of the deponets ws fforced to thrust 
them out of doores & told ym yt they would 
not be orderly he would lave handes ym." At 
the time of the noted raid of the Indians on 
Hatfield, on the 19th of September, 1677, 
William Bartholomew was present. His 
daughter Abigail, aged four years, was taken, 
with twelve others, and carried through the 
forests and across the lakes into Canada, where 
she was kept eight months, being finally ran- 



j-onied, with others, on the 23d of May, 1678, 
Ijy the payment of two hundred pouncls. In 
this connection is made the following extract 
from a letter written by Samuel Partridge to 
the general court: "Att Eleven of the Clock 
in ye day time the enemy came upon Hatfield 
(When ye greatest part of tiie men belonging 
to the Towne were dispersed into ye nicaddws) 
and Shott down 3 men within ye Touih' for- 
tification, killed and took women and ciiiidrcii 
& burnt houses & Barnes ^e number of which 
are as followeth, — Killed' (male) 12; taken 
13, including A child of Win. Bartholomew; 
wounded 4." 

On the atli of May, 1679, the town voted 
to William Bartholomew twenty acres of land 
on condition that he build a mill and settle 
in the town. On the 7th of February, 1681, 
he was given permission to set up a saw mill. 
.\ugust 11, 1683, he was appointed to go to 
.Massachusetts Bay to do his utmost endeavor 
to procure a minister for the town. On jS'o- 
vember 1st of the same year he was appointed 
to keep ordinary in Branford. In 1684, in 
consideration of his endeavors for the procure- 
ment of a minister, he was granted twenty 
more acres of land, and in the following year 
he was associated with" John Frisbie in laying 
out and staking the highway to Guilford. On 
March 28, 1686 or 1687, he entered into an- 
other mill agi-eement, and on January 2d of 
the latter year the town objected to his dam 
and wanted him to build a bridge. Ten nun-e 
acres were laid out for liiin. A]n-il 27, 1687, 
the town of Woodstock was anxious to obtain 
his services and passed the following resolu- 
tion: "The committee in the town's behalf 
give and grant to William Bartholomew above 
said, on condition of his building a corn mill 
on the Falls below ^Muddy I'.rook ponds and 
finding the town with grinding good meal 
clear of gritt, as other towns have generally 
found these following ))arti<-ulars, — 1. 'i'he 
place at the aforesaid falls to sett a mill wth 
the benefit of the streams. 2. .V fifteen acres 
home lot with 15 acres rigid of upland and a 
thirty acre right of meadow. 3. One hun- 
dred acres of upland.-"' The Woodstock people 
were also anxious to have the company of his 
good wife, Mary, and the following evidences 
wore given: "September 29th. It was granted 
at a full meeting of the projirietors, that Will- 
iam Bartholomew should have twenty acres of 
land * * * provided he bring his wife and 
settle upon it bv next June following." 

On the 13th of July, 1689, William Bar- 
tholomew was commissioned, by the governor 
of the colonies of Massachusetts, ensign of the 
New Roxbury Company. In October, 1690, 
he M-as made chairman of the committee as- 



73f. 



HISTOKY OF GJIEATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



.signed to the providing for the building of a 
liouse for the minister. In November of the 
same year he became one of the selectmen of 
tlie town. -May 21, 1691, he was made lieu- 
tenant in the militia company mentioned, and 
June 8, 1692, he was chosen repr-csentative at 
I lie general court or assembly at Boston. This 
was a very important session and he consti- 
tuted a committee on the distribution of pub- 
lic lands to the inhabitants. His popularity 
in Woodstock was even greater than it had 
been in Branford. The people of the town 
conferred upon him nearly every honor at their 
disposal, including those already noted. Thus 
he was the first representative of the to^\Ti to 
the general court and as lieutenant he com- 
manded all subject to military service in the 
town. He died at the age of fifty-seven years. 

The next in the line of direct descent to 
Judge Bartholomew, of Indianapolis, was An- 
drew Bartholomew, son of William (II) and 
Mary Bartholomew, just mentioned. He was 
born at Roxbury, December 11, 1670. About 
1698 he married Hannah, daughter of Samuel 
Frisbie, of Branford. He died between 1752 and 
17-55 and she died February 2, 1741. He 
managed his fathers mills in Branford and 
Woodstock, and after the death of his father 
was associated with his brother Benjamin in 
the operation of the mills. January 11, 1711, 
the brothers divided their properties and An- 
drew turned his attention principally to agri- 
cultural pursuits, purchasing large tracts of 
land in Branford, Wallingford and adjoining 
towns. He removed to Wallingford prior to 
1729 and there passed the residue of his life. 
He was a prominent and influential citizen of 
Branford and held various offices of public 
trust. Both he and his wife joined the church 
in that town, in the opening years of the 
eighteenth century. 

Andrew Bartholomew (II), son of Andrew 
and Hannah (^Fris^bie) Bartholomew, was born 
in Branford on the 7th of November, 1714. 
In Harwinton, ^fassachusetts, on the 29th of 
October, 1740. he married Sarah Catlin. of 
that place, and he died March 6, 1776. His 
wife was bom June 16, 1719, and died De- 
cember 1, 1789. He was a clergyman and a 
man of fine intellectual attainments, having 
been graduated in Yale College as. a meml>er 
i>f the class of 17.31. He was called as min- 
ister of the church at Harwinton October 21, 
17.38, and for settling there he was given one 
Inindrcd acres of land and one Imndred pounds 
in labor, the latter annuallv. He accepted', and 
was ordained October 4, 1738, continuing his 
pastorate at Harwinton about thirty-five rears. 
In 1773 or 1774 he- released the inhabitants 
from paying his salary and they in turn re- 



leased him and his wife from the payment of 
taxes. He there remained, a loved and honored 
pastor, until his death. 

Andrew Bartholomew (III), son of Rev. An- 
drew and Sarah (Catlin) Bartholomew, was 
born in Harwinton on the 8th of August, 1745. 
December 27, 1769, he married Sarah Wiard, 
of Farmington. She was born November 25, 
1745, and died September 5, 1813. As his 
second wife he married Eunice Clapp, and his 
death occurred July 9, 1821. He held the of- 
fice of key-keeper, sealer of measures, land ap- 
praiser, etc., for many years. He took the 
oath of fidelity April 13, 1778, and he served 
as captain of the militia. In 1796 he pur- 
chased one hundred acres of land in Mont- 
gomery, Massachusetts, whither he removed, 
and he later purchased other land, besides be- 
coming the owner of grist, saw, shingle and 
cloverseed mills. 

Harris Bartholomew, son of Andrew and 
Sarah ^ Wiard) Bartholomew, was born in 
Montgomery, Massachusetts, on the 28th of 
]\lay, 1785.' On the 26th of January, 1809, 
he married Irene Parks, who was born March 
14, 1789, and who died in Montgonier\' Octo- 
ber 25, 1853. He was one of the representa- 
tive farmers of Montgomery during his entire 
active career and held the inviolable esteem 
of the community, in which he was called upon 
to serve in various offices of public trust, in- 
cluding those of selectman and school com- 
missioner. He died in Montgomery on the 
28th of March 1860. 

Harris Bartholomew. Jr., son of Harris and 
Irene (Parks) Bartholomew, was born in 
Montgomery, Massachusetts, on the 11th of 
September,'l813. On the 16th of April, 1834, 
was solemnized his marriage to Miss Betsey 
Moore, daughter of Pliny Moore, of Mont- 
gomery. She was born May 22, 1808, and died 
September 3, 1846. On the 14th of Decem- 
ber, 1847, at Easthampton, Massachusetts, he 
wedded Miss Deborah Spaulding Coleman. 
She was born at Shelbume, Massachusetts, on 
the 11th of August, 1827. Mr. Bartholomew 
was for many years an influential citizen and 
lending merchant of Northampton, Ma.ssachu- 
setts. and he served as a member of the state 
legislature in 1850-51. From that place he 
removed to Watertown, New York, where be 
was engaged in the shoe business for some time 
and whence he finally removed to Canton, that 
state, where he engaged in the drv-goods busi- 
ness. Later he conducted a general store at 
Hermon, New York, and while a resident of 
that place he served as village trustee and 
school commissioner, besides holding other po- 
sitions of trust. In 1869 he disposed of his 
business in Hermon and removed to Indian- 



HISTOKY OF GREATER mDIANAPOLlS. 



737 



apoli;?, Indiana, where for some time he was 
associated with his sou Harris 'SI. in the whole- 
sale tea and tobacco business, under the firm 
name of Bartholomew & Son. At the time of 
his retirement from this line of enterprise the 
firm's place of business was at 23 East Mar\'- 
land street. Having thus severed his connec- 
tion with business affairs in the capital city, 
he removed to Cambridge City, this state, 
where he was engaged in the shoe business 
for some time and where he served as elder 
in the Presbyterian church. A few years prior 
to his death he returned to Indianapolis, where 
he became proprietor of a shoe store at the 
old No. 465 South ileridian street, where he 
eontintied in business until his demise, which 
occurred on the 27th of March, 1887. His 
second wife passed away on the 25th day of 
JSTovember, 1905, at Westfield, and was buried 
at Crown Hill, Indianapolis. Of the four 
children of the first marriage one is living, 
and of the children of the second union two 
are living, ilr. Bartholomew was a man of 
upright character, sturdy integrity of purpose 
and gracious personality, and to him was ever 
accorded the fullest measure of popular con- 
fidence and esteem. His political allegiance 
was given to the Democratic party and he was 
a lifelong member of the Presbyterian church, 
in whose work he took an active part. 

Pliny Webster Bartholomew, the immediate 
subject of this review, was the third in order 
of birth of the children of Harris and Betsey 
(^loore) Bartholomew, and when he was about 
nine months old his parents removed from his 
native town of Cabotville, Massachusetts, to 
Easthampton, that state, where they main- 
tained their home for several years, after which 
they located in Xorthampton, Massachusetts, 
where they resided until Pliny \V. was about 
fifteen years old, so that it was in that place 
that he received his rudimentary education. 
At the age noted, owing to the business re- 
verses of his father, who then removed from 
Northampton, Judge Bartholomew was thrown 
largely upon his own resources, under which 
conditions he bravely faced the responsibilities 
devolving upon him. and he initiated his in- 
dependent career by securing employment as 
clerk in a grocery and meat market in Xorth- 
amjiton. where he was thus engaged about two 
vcnrs. In the meanwhile his father had taken 
up his residence and engaged in business at 
Cnnton. New York, and the subject of this 
review was there employed in his father's store 
about one year, at the expiration of which the 
family removed to Hermon, that state. 

Endowed with an alert and recentive mind. 
.Tudsre Bartholomew was early animated with 
nniliifi'iii to secure a college education, of whose 



advantages he was fully appreciative. With 
this end in view he passed the required exam- 
ination which made him eligible for pedagogic 
honors, and by his labors as a teacher in the 
eoimtry schools he earned the money which 
enabled him to initiate his college work. In 
1S61 he was matriculated in Union College, at 
Schenectady, New York, in which he was 
graduated in 1861, with the honors of his 
class. He received at this time the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts and three years later his 
alma mater conferred upon him the degree of 
Master of Arts. Throughout his collegiate 
course he defrayed his own expenses by teach- 
ing school at intervals and by working at 
various occupations during his vacations. 

After leaving college Judge Bartholomew 
located in the village of Ballston Spa, New 
York, where he devoted somewhat more than 
two years to reading law under effective pre- 
ceptorship. He passed the required examina- 
tion for admission to the bar, at Schenectady, 
New York, on the 3d of May, 1865, and forth- 
with he entered into a professional partner- 
ship with his honored preceptor, Judge Jesse 
L'amoreaux, of Ballston Spa, an alliance which 
obtained until the latter part of November, 
1866, when he came to Indianapolis, Indiana, 
which city has since represented his home and 
the field of his abla and successful endeavors 
in his profession. Here he has been continu- 
ously engaged in practice during the long in- 
tervening period, save for such time as he has 
served on the bench of the superior court, and 
his professional business has been large and 
varied and of important order. As counsel he 
has been identified espeeiallv with many eele- 
lirated cases presented in the courts of the 
state, as well as in the federal courts, and 
he is known for his profound and exact knowl- 
edge of the law and precedents. He has 
labored with all of ardor and fidelity in his 
chosen profession, ever showing a deep appre- 
ciation of its dignity and responsibility and 
ever observing its ethical tenets in the minutest 
details. The chief elements of character con- 
tributing to his success at the bar and upon 
the bench are . his sound common sense, his 
knowledge of human nature and clear intui- 
tion of the credibility and force of evidence, 
his intellectual integrity and rectitude, his 
force of will and steady, untiring perseverance, 
and the conscientious thoroughness of his in- 
vestigation. Upon the bench his .statement of 
facts is condensed and lucid; his reasoning 
upon the questions of law or fact is terse, 
logical and forcible — expressed in language of 
simplicity and directness and entirely free 
from ambiguity. With an essentially judicial 
mind, his record on the bench has i>een most 



738 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



admiriiblo. Jn 181(0 he was elected judge of 
tlie superior court of Marion County, and his 
term expired on the 26th of October, ISOO. 
On the 3d of November, 1908, he was again 
called to the bench of the superior court, upon 
which he is now presiding, and his term will 
exj)ire on the 12th of November, 1912. 

In politics Judge Bartholomew is a stalwart 
advocate of the principles of the Democratic 
party, in whose cause he has given most ef- 
fective service, and he is now a member of 
the Indiana Democrat'c Club. ' He and his 
wife are zealous members of the Memorial 
Presbyterian Church, in which he has been 
an elder for a number of years past. He is 
also a member of the National Presbyterian 
Brotherhood. He is identified with American 
Bar Association and the Indiana State Bar As- 
sociation, which latter he has represented as a 
delegate to the conventions' of the former, in 
which he was at one time vice-president for 
Indiana. He is affiliated with the Knights of 
Pythias, of which he is past grand represen- 
tative in the grand lodge of the state, ajjd 
he is also a past grand dictator and supreni'^ 
representative of the Knights of Honor, of 
whose grand lodge in Indiana he is now treas- 
iirer. As a citizen he is essentially nn 
sive and public-spirited, and he has shown a 
lively interest in all that has tended to con- 
serve the civic and material advancement of 
the fair capital city in which he has so long 
maintained his home and in which he is hon- 
ored as an able lawyer and Jurist and as a 
man leal and loyal in all the relations of life. 

At Crawfordsville, Indiana, on the 30th of 
January, 1873, Judge Bartholomew was united 
in marriage to Miss Sarah Belle Smith, a 
daughter of George W. and Mary (Cromwell '> 
Smith, the latter of whom was a daughter of 
Colonel Joshua Cromwell, of Lexington, Ken- 
tucky. In conclusion is entered a brief record 
concerning the children of Judge and Mrs. 
Bartholomew. 

Belle Isadora was born in Indianapolis. 
April 2. 1876, and in this city, on the 27th 
of October, 1897, she was united in marriage 
to Allin Wright Hewitt. They now reside in 
Hackensack, New Jersey, and have four chil- 
dren, namelv: Arthnr Cromwell, bom at East 
St. Louis, Illinois. August 17, 1898; Helen 
TiOuise, bom in- Indianapolis, Indiana, June 
8, 1900: Sarah Lucile, born at Bogota, New 
Jersey, February 10, 1905; and Dorothy Belle, 
born at Hackensack, New Jersey, August 13, 
1907. Pliny Webster Bartholomew, Jr., was 
born October 4, 1880, and died October 13. 
1884. Harris Sherley Bartholomew was bom 
April 2.'). 188."), is now employed in the audit- 
ing department of the Bruswick-Balke-Collcn- 



der Company, of New York Cit^-, and resides 
in Hackensack, New Jersey. 

Louis G. Deschi.er. Among those who 
have rendered a due quota of aid in the up- 
building of the "Greater Indianapolis" Louis 
G. Deschler occupies a position of no minor 
importance, since he is identified, in a cap- 
italistic and executive way, with a number 
of important industrial and commercial en- 
terprises and is known as one of the alert, 
progressive and public-spirited citizens of 
the fair capital city. His precedence as one 
of the representative business men of Indian- 
apolis is the more gratifying to contemplate 
not only by reason of the fact that he is a 
native son of this city, but especially also ou 
the score that he has attained to success and 
influence through his own well directed ef- 
forts, having initiated his association with 
practical business affairs when a mere boy. 

Louis G. Deschler was born in Indianapolis 
on January 24, 1865, and is a son of Fred- 
erick Joseph and Louise (Lease) Deschler, 
both of whom were bom in Germany. The 
former passed the closing years of his life in 
Indianapolis, where he died October 6, 1897, 
and here the mother still maintains her 
home. The father took up his residence in 
Indianapolis in 1853 and he was long one 
of the prominent German business men of 
this city, where he was held in high esteem 
and where he was an active member of many 
of the leading German societies. He was a 
member of the Democratic party till Bryan 
was first nominated for president, at w-hich 
time Mr. Deschler joined the Republican 
ranks, not being a believer in free silver. 
Both he and his wife were communicants of 
the Catholic Church. 

Their son was reared to manhood in In- 
dianapolis, which has ever represented his 
home and which has witnessed his rise from 
obscurity to a position as one of the substan- 
tial capitalists and successful business men of 
the state. As a child he attended a private 
German school and for a time was a student 
in a Catholic parochial school, but his edu- 
cation has largely been gained through self- 
discipline and under the direction of that 
wisest of all head-masters, experience. When 
but thirteen years of age Mr. Deschler left 
school and initiated his independent career 
by becoming salesman in a cigar stand. He 
soon gained a discriminating knowledge of 
the business and finally assumed charge of 
the cigar stand in the old Bates House, w-hich 
occupied a portion of the site of the present 
metropolitan Cla>T>ool Hotel. In June. 1883, 
when eighteen years of age, Mr. Deschler pur- 
chased the cigar stand in the Bates House, 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOTJS. 



r39 



borrowing the money with which to effect 
this transaction, and he devoted liimself as- 
siduously to the work of promoting the busi- 
ness by every legitimate means. His genial 
personality and careful and courteous service 
gained to him still stronger hold upon the 
esteem of the traveling public as well as that 
of the local trade, and he made his business 
very successful, as is evident when we revert 
to the fact that in the ownership of the cigar 
stand mentioned is to be ascribed the nucleus 
of the ample fortune which Mr. Deschler has 
since gained through his energy, aggressive 
business policy and sterling integrity of pur- 
pose. He is now one of the leading whole- 
sale and retail tobacco dealers in Indiana, and 
from his wholesale establishment is main- 
tained a corps of six traveling salesmen. In 
1907 he erected his present fine building, 
known as the Deschler building, at 135 South 
Illinois street, at a cost of sixtj' thousand 
dollars, and this is the headquarters of his 
wholesale business. The building is con- 
structed of brick and stone, is thoroughly 
modern in architectural design and equip- 
ment and is one of the handsome business 
blocks of the city, being three stories in 
height, ilr. Deschler maintains six retail 
cigar stores in Indianapolis, and among the 
number is the one in the Cla}T)ool Hotel, the 
lineal successor of the business he there main- 
tained when he began his independent busi- 
ness career. He also has a well equipped re- 
tail store in the City of Lafayette, Indiana. 

Mr. Deschler is one of the stockholders of 
the Indiana Hotel Company and is also one 
of the seven members of the directorate of 
this corporation, which erected and which 
also owns and manages the magnificent Clay- 
pool Hotel, the finest in the State of Indiana 
and one of the best in the middle west. Mr. 
Deschler has other capitalistic and business 
interests in his native city, is essentially pro- 
gressive and enterprising, and as a citizen has 
the highest civic ideals and loyalty. His po- 
litical support is given to the Republican 
party, though he has never cared to enter the 
arena of practical politics, and he is a com- 
municant of the Catholic Church, in whose 
faith he was reared. He is a member of the 
l^Iarion, Columbia, Commercial and Country 
Clubs, all representative organizations of the 
capital city, and of the Board of Trade, and 
also holds membership in the German House, 
the Indianapolis Maennerchor, the Deutscher 
Klub und Musikverein. and other leading 
German societies. He is well known in the 
city and state, and his circle of friends is 
limited only by that of his acquaintances. 

Dr. John B. Long. Indianapolis is the 

Vol. 11—7 



home of many prominent members of the 
medical profession, and numbered among this 
coterie is Dr. John B. Long, a successful prac- 
titioner here for many years. He was born 
in Marion County, Indiana, near the city of 
Clermont, but received his early educational 
training in the public schools of Marion 
County, this state, and in Butler College. 
His medical studies were pursued first under 
the instructions of Dr. Joseph Eastman in 
Indianapolis, and following his graduation 
in medicine in 1882 he began the practice 
of his chosen profession in Indianapolis, where 
he has won a reputation as a skilled physi- 
cian. His offices are at 760 W. New York 
street. Dr. Long served as professor and 
demonstrator of anatomy for fifteen years 
in the Central College of Physicians and Sur- 
geons, and as professor of obstetrics in the 
same institution for three years. He is a 
post graduate of the New York Medical Col- 
lege, served one year as a member of the 
Indianapolis Board of Health during the ad- 
ministration of Mayor Denny, and is a mem- 
ber of the Marion County Medical Society, 
the State Medical Society, the American Med- 
ical Association, Axicient Landmarks Lodge 
No. 319, F. & A. M.; Indiana Consistory, 
S. P. R. S. ; Murat Temple, A. A. 0. N. M. S., 
and since 1882 has been a member of the 
Central Christian Church. His politics are 
Republican. 

Dr. Long is a son of William P. Long, who 
was born in Hamilton County, Ohio, Decem- 
ber 10, 1825. He came to Rush County, In- 
diana, with his parents, Daniel and Rachel 
(Sparks) Long, in 1832, where they located 
on a farm. On the 13th of March, 1848, 
William P. Long came to Pike Township, 
Marion County, where he lived in a little 
log cabin until 1854, in that year building 
and moving into the home in which his son 
John was born on the following 20th of Au- 
gust. He continued to farm his land there 
until 1907, when he retired from active pur- 
suits, and although he yet claims his residence 
at this old homestead the greater part of his 
time is spent with his son in Indianapolis. 
He has held many of the township offices, and 
he has been a Republican since the organiza- 
tion of that partJ^ During fifty years or 
more he has been a member of the Christian 
Church at Clermont, one of its elders and 
devoted workers. In Rush County, Indiana, 
February 24, 1848. William P. Long was 
married to Sarah Reeve, born in Fleming 
County, Kentucky. October 22, 1827, and she 
is now deceased. This union was blessed by 
the birth of seven children, b^t three of the 
number died young, and the four now living 



740 



HISTOKY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



are: Elizabeth, the wife of Dr. H. F. Har- 
naday ; -John B. ; Benjamin F., who is mar- 
ried and living in Indianapolis, and Mary, the 
wife of Franklin Johnson. 

Dr. John B. Long on the 20th of August, 
1878, was married' to Margaret L. Hunt, born 
in Rush County, Indiana, May 14, 1854, a 
daughter of Abijah W. and Margaret (Ste- 
phen) Hunt, the father dying in 1892, when 
eighty-three years of age, and the mother in 
1873. They reared a large family of children, 
the daughter Margaret having been the thir- 
teenth born. Mr. Hunt was a farmer in Rush 
County. The four children which have been 
born to Dr. and Mrs. Long are : Lulu E., the 
wife of Frederick J. Niedhamer, living in In- 
dianapolis: William Hunt, a graduate of But- 
ler College and the Indiana Medical College 
with the class of 1908, and nt)w practicing in 
this city; Frank E., a graduate of the Phila- 
delphia Dental College with the class of 1907 
and now in practice in this city, and married 
to Eda Steeg; and Mabel C, a graduate of 
Butler College. Dr. Long has given to his 
children splendid educational advantages, and 
he may well be proud of the high station 
which they now occupy in life. 

Francis Patrick Bailey. Indianapolis has 
bt'cn the home of Francis Patrick Bailey since 
he was fourteen years of age. so that the com- 
munity has had a fair opportunity of estimat- 
ing his strength and uprightness of character; 
with the result that nothing but good has ever 
been said regarding him. His ability as a busi- 
ness man has been especially prominent in the 
field as a furniture manufacturer, and for 
more than thirty years he has been one of the 
leading forces in the development of the L. W. 
Ott Manufacturing Company, of which he is 
now the vice-president. Mr. Bailey is a native 
of Cincinnati. Ohio, where he was bom March 
11, 1857. to Michael and Marcella (Dailey) 
Bailey. His parents were both natives of Ire- 
land, and the father was born at No. 2 Duke 
street, Dublin, which is one of the picturesque, 
interesting and historical spots of that city. 
The old Bailey house located there is one of 
the most famous hostelries of that city and is 
still maintained in first class style. Mr. 
Bailey's parents were married in this section 
of Dublin, and came to tlio United States soon 
afterwards. They first located in Boston, 
where they remained about three vears, whence 
they removed to Cincinnati, Ohio, which, as 
stated, was the birthplace of Francis Patrick. 
In 1871 the parents located in Indianapolis, 
where they passed the remainder of their days 
at 20'3fi Capitol avenue, north. 

Frnncis Patrick Bailey was in his fourteenth 
year when his parents came t« Indianapolis, 



and that city has since been his home. At 
the time of their arrival business men were 
agitated by a great real estate boom, and young 
liailey became a part of it by entering the em- 
ploy of a leading house engaged in that line. 
He remained with this concern for a number 
of years, and then engaged in the furniture 
business, his identification with which has con- 
tinued until the present time. At the outset 
of his career he accepted a minor position with 
the L. W. Ott ilanufacturing Company, a 
house which had been established by John Ott 
in 1850 who was one of the pioneers in the 
manufacture of furniture in Indianapolis. The 
founder was succeeded by his son Lewis W. Ott, 
who in turn died in 1885. At this time the 
business was incorporated under the firm style 
of The L. W. Ott Manufacturing Company, of 
which W. F. Kuhn became president and is 
still the incumbent of that office. Of late 
years the company has been giving especial at- 
tention to the manufacture of leather and up- 
holstered goods, and has earned such a high 
reputation in this line that its output is now 
shipped to all parts of the world. At various 
world's fairs and other minor exhibits the L. 
W. Ott Manufacturing Company has been 
awarded first class medals both for the sub- 
stantial make of its furniture and for its ar- 
tistic qualities. It is therefore a high honor 
to be connected with an institution of this 
kind. 

Speaking more personally it may be stated 
that Mr. Bailey's religious faith is that of Bo- 
man Catholicism. For more than twenty-five 
years he has also been found among the stanch 
supporters of total abstinence. He is a man 
of rugged constitution and fine physique, 
weighing about two hundred pounds, and is 
a striking illustration in defense of temper- 
ance, which he has so long advocated. 

In 1883 Mr. Bailey married Miss Emma 
Ott, daughter of John and Julia (Reproth) 
Ott, both of whom were natives of Bavaria, 
Germany. John Ott, the founder of the busi- 
ness of which Mr. Bailey is now the vice-presi- 
dent, as has been stated, fixed his early resi- 
dence at what is now West Washington, be- 
tween Senate and Capitol avenues, and this lo- 
cation was the birthplace of his daughter, who 
is now Mrs. Francis P. Bailev. Mr. and Mrs. 
Bailey have become the parents of Francis P.. 
Jr.. John J., August L., Julia M. and Emma. 
The sons are all engaged in the manufacture 
of metal and furniture polish, and are pros- 
pering as members of the Crown !Manufactur- 
ing Company. 

Charles N. "Wn.UAJis. Commanding a 
post of importance in connection with finan- 
cial aflFairs in the capital city of his nativ.> 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



"41 



state, Charles N. "Williams, who is president 
of the Farmers Tnist Company, of Indian- 
apolis, is one of the representative business 
men and liberal and loyal citizens of the 
city, where he stands exemplar of that' pro- 
gressive spirit which is making for the fur- 
ther advancement of the "Greater Indian- 
apolis". 

Charles N. Williams M'as born on a farm 
near Dayton, Tippecanoe County, Indiana, 
on the 10th of April, 1856, and is a son of 
Henry and Martha (Barnum) Williams, both 
of whom were born in the State of Connecti- 
cut, being representatives of old and honored 
families of New England, the cradle of much 
of our national history. For a number of 
years Henry Williams was engaged in the 
wholesale dry-goods business in the City of 
Lafayette, Indiana, when he finally removed 
to Crawfordsville, where he continued in the 
same line of enterprise and where he long 
held prestige as one of the honored and in- 
fluential citizens and able business men of that 
section of the state. Both he and his wife 
continued to reside in CrawfordsviUe until 
their death. Of their two children the sub- 
.ject of this review is the younger, and Laura 
is the wife of Benjamin F. Crabbs of Craw- 
fordsville. Mrs. Martha (Barnum) Williams 
was first married to John L. Covin, who was 
a native of Baltimore, Maryland, and who 
was for a numbei* of years engaged in the 
retail drj^-goods business in Quincy, Illinois, 
where his death occurred. Of the five chil- 
dren of this union one is living. 

Charles N. Williams was afforded the ad- 
rantages of the excellent public schools of 
Crawfordsville, after which he was for three 
years a student in Wabash College. After 
leaving college he was employed for three 
years in the postoffice at Crawfordsville, and 
thereafter he was there engaged in the real 
estate and loan business until 1886, when 
he became state representative for Indiana 
of the Provident Life & Trust Company, of 
Philadelphia, having charge of the investing 
of their capital in approved farm and city 
loans in Ohio, Indiana and Illinois. In 1881 
he was one of the organizers of the Citizens 
National Bank of Crawfordsville, and he con- 
tinued a member of its directorate until June, 
1896, when he removed to Indianapolis and 
established the private banking house of C. 
N. Williams & Company. He built up a 
prosperous business and the same was con- 
tinued under the title noted until 1905, when 
he organized the Farmers Trust Company, 
which absorbed the banking business and 
which is incorporated with a capital stock of 
$100,000. This is one of the ably managed 



and eminently solid financial institutions of 
the state and Mr. Williams has been presi- 
dent of the same from the time of its in- 
corporation. Since 190.3 he has also been In- 
diana state representative of the celebrated 
Prudential Life Insurance Company, of New- 
ark, New Jersey, and has direct control of 
the company investments in Indiana. 

In polities Mr. AVilliams is found arrayed 
as a .stalwart in the camp of the Republican 
party, and he has given effective service in 
the promotion of its cause. For eight years 
he was chairman of the Republican county 
committee of Montgomery county, and he 
marshaled his forces with marked ability in 
the various local and state campaigns dur- 
ing this period. He is affiliated with Mont- 
gomery Lodge No. 50, Free & Accepted Ma- 
sons; Crawfordsville Chapter No. 40, Royal 
Arch Masons; Montgomery Council No. 34, 
Royal & Select Masters, and Athens Chap- 
ter No. 27, Order of the Eastern Star; Craw- 
fordsville Commandery No. 25, Knights 
Templars, all of which organizations are lo- 
cated in Crawfordsville; and in Indianapolis 
he is identified with ilurat Temple, Ancient 
Arabic Order of the Nobles of the Mystic 
Shrine. 

On the 6th of April, 1897, Mr. WiUiams. 
was united in marriage to Miss Margaret 
Doll, who was born and reared in Lafayette, 
Indiana, a daughter of the late James Doll, 
a representative citizen of that place. 

John N. Hurtt, M. D. A distinguished 
member of the medical profession in the cap- 
ital city is Dr. John N. Hurty, for the last 
fifteen years state health commissioner and a 
member of the faculty of his alma mater, 
the Department of Medicine of the Indiana 
University. Dr. Hurty is a native of 
Lebanon, Ohio, where he was born on the 
21st of February, 1852, and he was the fourth 
in order of birth of the three sons and two 
daughters of Professor Josiah and Anne I. 
(Walker) Hurty, both of whom were bom 
in the State of New York, the former of Ger- 
man and the latter of English lineage. They 
were reared and educated in the old Empire 
state and in the City of Rochester their mar- 
riage was solemnized. The father was a 
scholar and man of fine intellectual attain- 
ments and was for many years prominent in 
the field of popular education. He removed 
from New York to Ohio, where he foUoweil 
the pedagogic profession until 1855, when he 
came to Indiana and located in Richmond, 
which was then a fair sized town, and he 
there became the first superintendent of the 
public schools of the town. Later he was 
similarly and most successfully engaged at 



742 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



Liberty, North Madison, Rising Sim and Law- 
renceburg, and he was one of the well known 
and highly honored pioneer teachers of the 
state. He" passed the latter days of his long 
and useful life in the State of Mississippi, 
whither he had gone in the hope of recuperat- 
ing his health, and there he died at the age 
of seventy-five years. His devoted wife was 
summoned to the life eternal in 1881, at the 
age of seventy-nine years, and of their chil- 
dren four are now living. Professor Hurty 
was affiliated with the time-honored Masonic 
fraternity and gave his support to the cause 
of the Republican party from the time of 
its organization until his death. Both he and 
his wife were zealous members of the Pres- 
byterian Church. 

Dr. John N. Hurty gained his early edu- 
cational discipline in the public schools of 
the several towns in which his father was en- 
gaged as superintendent of the same, and in 
1872 he completed one year of the prescribed 
technical course in the Philadelphia College 
of Pliarmacy & Chemistry, in the City of 
Philadelphia. In 1881 he received from Pur- 
due University, at Lafayette, Indiana, the de- 
gree of Doctor of Pharmacy. He had the 
distinction of being the founder of the school 
of pharmacy of this university, and he was 
its head for a period of two years, within 
which he brought the department up to a 
high standard of efficiency. 

The doctor's thorough training in the close- 
ly allied profession of pharmacy had well 
fortified him for further study in preparing 
himself definitely for the medical profession, 
and after taking a course of lectures in Jef- 
ferson Medical College, in the City of Phila- 
delphia, he entered the Medical College of 
Indiana, in Indianapolis, where he completed 
the prescribed course and was graduated as 
a member of the class of 1891, duly receiv- 
ing his well earned degree of Doctor of Medi- 
cine and coming forth specially well equipped 
for the exacting work of his chosen vocation. 
As a physician he has since been engaged in 
the active practice of preventive medicine. 
Since 1897 he has held the chair of hygiene 
and sanitary science in the Medical College 
of Indiana, now the inedical department of 
Indiana University, and he is one of the 
members of the faculty of this weU ordered 
institution. In 1894, without solicitation or 
suggestion on his part. Dr. Hurty was ap- 
pointed secretary of the Indiana State Board 
of Health, which position he still holds. He 
is thoroughly en rapport with his profession 
and continues a elcse student of the science 
of hygiene. He is a member of the American 
Medical Association, the American Public 



Health Association, the American Associati.on 
for the Advancement of Science, the Amer- 
ican Pharmaceutical Association, the Indiana 
State Medical Society and the Indianapolis 
]Medical Society. He is the author of a school 
text book on hygienic subjects, the same being 
entitled "Life with Health". He has also 
contributed to the leadmg periodical publi- 
cations of his profession and has been called 
upon to prepare and read many papers be- 
fore the various" professional associations with 
which he is identified. He was superintend- 
ent of the hygienic exhibit at the Louisiana 
Purchase Exposition, held in the City of St. 
Louis, and had much to do with bringing the 
same into favorable attention on the part of 
both the profession and the laity. In poli- 
tics he is a supporter of the principles and 
policies for which the Republican party 
stands sponsor, but he has never manifested 
aught of ambition for the honors or emolu- 
ments of political office. 

On the 25th of October, 1877, Dr. Hurty 
was united in marriage to Miss Ethel John- 
stone, who was born and reared in Indian- 
apolis, being a daughter of Dr. John F. John- 
stone. The two children of this union are 
Gilbert J. and Anne M. Hurty. 

J. Richard Francis. A representative busi- 
ness man of the city of Indianapolis, where 
he ifs president of the Francis Pharmacy Com- 
pany and chemist for the Cleveland, Cincin- 
nati, Chicago & St. Louis Railroad Company, 
J. Richard Francis has attained distinction 
and wide reputation in the line of his profes- 
sion and his fine retail establishment in the 
capital city is one of the best equipped and 
most ably managed drug stores in the middle 
west, having facilities of the highest grade and 
affording a service that has called forth the 
most unequivocal commendation on the part 
of the medical fraternity. Mr. Francis is an 
authority in the domain of pharmaceutical- 
chemistry, in which his researches and original 
investigations have been wide and varied, and 
in the practical field he has produced results 
that have contributed to the wellbeing of hu- 
maiiity in no insignificant sense. Of the es- 
tablishment of the Francis Pharmacy Company 
the following pertinent statements have been 
made: "The prescription department ranks 
among the very best in the middle west, the 
laboratory has no superior in the city or in 
the state. The work done in both is alwavs 
performed with the utmost regard for the 
public good as well as in affording punctilious 
servite to patrons". Mr. Francis has concen- 
trated distinctive technical and business en- 
ergies and through this medium gained con- 
crete results of worth and magnitude. 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



743 



■\Ve of this restless,, vigorous twentieth cen- 
turv can 2iot afford to hold in light esteem the 
lives and services of those who have wronght 
uobly in the past, from which has come the 
beneficent heritage of the present. j\Ir. Fran- 
cis may revert with satisfaction to his genealogy 
in both the agnatic and maternal lines, and 
the name which he bears has been identified 
with the annals of American history from the 
colonial epoch to the present time. Strong 
men and true; gentle and gracious women, 
have represented the name as one generation 
has followed another on to the stage of life's 
activities, and loyalty and patriotism have been 
in distinctive evidence, while the family 
escutcheon has ever been a symbol of integrity, 
honor and usefulness. 

The original progenitors of the Francis fam- 
ily in America were three brothers of the name 
wlio came to the new world from their native 
AVales, one settling in the State of New York, 
one in New Jersev and the third in Virginia. 
From the New Jersey representative the sub- 
ject of this review traces his line of direct 
descent. His great-grandfather was a valiant 
soldier in the Continental line in the War of 
the Revolu'ion. His grandfather Richard 
Francis became seized of a large landed es- 
tate in New Jersey and was a citizen of prom- 
inence and influence in his community, having 
served in various offices of public trust and 
having been known as a most devout Christian 
and thorough Bible student. His wife, whose 
maiden name was Anna Carr, was a member 
of an old and honored family of New Jersey 
and one distantly related to the Bonaparte 
family of which the great Napoleon was a 
member. Richard and Anna (Carr) Francis 
had a large family of children, and of these 
Dr. Joseph Francis was the father of him 
whose name initiates this review. 

Dr. Joseph Francis, long numbered among 
the able physicians and surgeons of the State 
of Indiana, was born in Monmouth County, 
New Jersey, where he was reared to maturity 
and where he secured his early educational 
discipline. Concerning his early career the 
following somewhat intimate record is well 
worthy of perpetuation in this article: "His 
father was a very strict disciplinarian, and 
because of a thrashing administered to him 
by his father, Joseph, who had no small meas- 
ure of the paternal spirit, left home at the 
age of eighteen years, coming west to Indiana 
in company with his brother, Dr. Edward T. 
Francis. The boys had grit and ability, and 
they determined to make their way to success 
in spite of the adverse circumstances then pre- 
vailing in their new surroundings. They set- 
tled in Shelby Countv, Indiana, where they 



found employment in cutting cordwood for a 
prominent farmer of the locality. Being 
totally unaccustomed to such work, they found 
it particularly severe, but they kept at it so 
bravely that they won the good will and es- 
teem of their employer, 5lr. Banker, who 
joined with his wife in inviting the young 
men to make their home with him. The of- 
fer was accepted, and the Francis brothers 
took up the study of medicine with Mr. Bank- 
ers sons, Wilson and Adoniram,- — all four 
young men becoming physicians. They all at- 
tended the Hartsville Classical School, an In- 
diana institution of learning famous in that 
day." 

Joseph Pl-ancis was graduated in the Ohio 
^ledical College, at Cincinnati, from which in- 
stitution he received his degree of Doctor of 
!^fedicine, and his alma mater offered him the 
chair of chemistry after his graduation, but 
he refused the flattering overture to establish 
himself in the private practice of his profes- 
sion. He located at Fountaintown, Shelby 
County, Indiana, and there he maintained his 
home during the residue of his long and sig- 
nally useful life, laboring with all of zeal of 
devotion in the service of suffering humanity 
and gaining the veneration and love of the 
community in which he thus proved himself 
one of the world's noble army of workers. He 
was often urged to seek a wider field of labor, 
this course being advised by fellow practition- 
ers who recognized his great technical skill 
and abilitv, but he preferred to remain in his 
chosen field, where for thirty years he rode 
and wrote, doing much to aid and encourage 
his fellow men and to bring them up to a 
higher plane of living, as his influence was as 
potent in a moral way as in the line of his 
profession. Concerning him the following ap- 
preciative statements have been written: "He 
was a high type of the devoted family physi- 
cian, possessing a most comprehensive knowl- 
edge of general materia medica and thera- 
peutics and in this respect being far ahead 
of his average professional contemporary. He 
was regarded with special confidence as a re- 
liable obstetrician. At one time he did not 
remove his clothing for sixteen days. He was 
attending thirty-two cases of typhoid-pneu- 
monia, and lost but one,— a wonderful record 
indeed. Dr. Elder, for manv years secretary 
of the Indiana Medical College, practiced in 
the same neighborhood with Dr. Francis and 
they became warm friends. When Dr. Elder 
located in Indianapolis he tried to induce Dr. 
Francis to accompany him hither, as his part- 
ner, as he, in common with other" friends and 
admirers of Dr. Francis, believed that the lat- 
ter could win a high place in the profession 



T44 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



iiiiilci' luoro favcjrabl'j circumstances. But lie 
jirefeneil the Jocatiou of his first choice and 
continued liiere ujitil his death, which oc- 
curred on tlie 14th of March, 1893." None 
could ask to liavc acconiphshed a noble.'- life 
work than did this unassuming, kindly and 
xmseifish physician, and the results of his serv- 
ices abide in the tender reverence accorded 
])is memory in the community in which he so 
long lived and labored to goodly ends. Dr. 
Francis married Miss Catherine Mutz, daugh- 
ter of Hon. .Jacob and Anna Maria (Snepii 
]\rutz, and their only child was J. Richard 
Francis, the immediate subject of this sketch. 
Dr. Francis was a Republican in his political 
adhcrency and he was zealous in the work of 
the Methodist Church. Mrs. Francis is living 
ni'ar Shelbyville, Indiana, and is an active 
member of the English Lutheran Church. 

Data relative to the genealogy of Mr. Fran- 
ces in the maternal line are properly given 
])lace at this juncture. Hon. Jacob Mutz, his 
maternal grandfather, was born in Lancaster 

County, Pennsylvania, being a son of 

and Mary (Frybarger) Mutz, the former of 
whom was born m Germany and the latter 
in Switzerland. When he was about four 
years of age his parents removed from the 
old Keystone state to Ohio, taking up their 
residence in Miami County, that state, near 
the close of the second decade of the nine- 
teenth century, and there passing the remain- 
der of their lives. In that county Jacob Mutz 
was reared to manliood on the pioneer farm, 
and as a young man he came to Indiana and 
took up his residence in Shelby County, where 
1)0 married Anna Maria Snepp, who likewise 
was a native of Lancaster County, Pennsyl- 
vania, being a representative of one of the 
old and honored families of that section of 
the Keystone commonwealth. Jacob Mutz and 
his wife continued in loving companionship 
down the pathway of life for half a century 
and she died in October, 1898, shortly after 
they had celebrated their golden wedding. 
When venerable in years Mr. Mutz contracted 
a second marriage. Of the ten children of 
the first marriage si.\ are now living. 

Hon. Jacob 'Mutz was one of the prominent 
and influential citizens of his section of the 
state and was a leader in the ranks of the 
]')('inocratic i)arty in Shelby County. He was 
tlnee times elected to represent his county in 
the state legislature and was well known in 
other pnlilic capacities, having served for four- 
teen venrs as a member of the Indiana Stat(> 
Board of .Agriculture and having also been a 
nu>mber of the board of trusti-es of Purdue 
I'niversity. He was a prominent member of 
the Masonic fraternilv. and was one of the 



pillars of the St. George Lutheran Church, 
near Edinburg, Shelby County, in which he 
was a zealous and devoted worker and in which 
lie was the organizer of the Sunday school, 
which remains an honor to his memory. He 
was a man of broad and charitable views, 
kindly and tolerant in his attitude, and gener- 
ous in his benevolences and general helpful- 
ness. His >leath occurred on the 6th of Sep- 
tember, 190t, when he was nearly eighty-three 
years of age, and he is remembered with ven- 
eration as a man of -sterling character and as 
a worthy pioneer of the Hoosier common- 
wealth. 

J. Jiichard Francis, whose name initiates this 
article, was l>orn at Fountaintown , Slieiby 
County, Indiana, on the 31st of December, 
1870, and his early educational discipline was 
secured in the public schools of his native vil- 
lage. In 1887 he was matriculated in tlie jire- 
paratory department of Purdue University, at 
Lafayette, Indiana, in which he completed the 
prescribed course and was graduated in 1893, 
on the day which was saddened to him by 
the death of his venerated father. He re- 
ceived the degree of Graduate of Pharmacy. 
It was the wish of his father that he should 
enter the medical profession, but upon his 
graduation the dean of his alma mater recom- 
m.ended him to Dr. John N. Hurty, of Indian- 
apolis, for the position of assistant in the lat- 
ter's analytical laboratory. Mr. Francis came 
to Indianapolis and became the valued assist- 
ant of Dr. Hurty, with whom he continued 
in this capacity until the doctor was elected 
to the otfice of secretary of the state board of 
health, in 189.5, when Mr. Francis was ad- 
mitted to partnership in the business and as- 
sumed the management of the drug store, 
which was then conducted under the title of 
the J. N. Hurty Pharmacv Company. Tlie 
following pertinent statements in this connec- 
tion are entitled to perpetuation in this article: 
"The business of this concern has always been 
conducted on a most honorable basis, and its 
name, either under the original or the pres- 
ent regime, has never been used in connection 
with the popularization or advertisement of 
patent medicines or in connection with ques- 
tionable undertakings of any kind. In con- 
nection with his pharmacy Dr. Hurty opened 
an analytical laboratory, and this has been 
continued successfully ever since. There all 
(he drugs received into the pharmacy undergo 
careful preliminary inspection, and consider- 
able work from outside sources is also done 
there, — such as the analysis of water, the chem- 
ical work for the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chi- 
cago & St. Louis Railroad Company, etc., for 
which the laboratory is particularly well 



HISTOEY OF GKEATER INDIA^TAPOLIS. 



eriuippi'd. All this is carried on under the 
personal direction of Mr. Francis, who has at- 
tained a reputation for abilitj' and trustworthi- 
ness not surpassed by any member of the pro- 
fession in this state. Mr. Francis has put his 
vioorous mentality to many severe tests in the 
past iew years' which have been devoted to 
work taxing to the utmost his physical as well 
as his intellectual strength. Fortunately he is 
endowed with a strong constitution and has 
had excellent health, which has made possible 
his continued exertions from the time he en- 
tered upon his present line." 

In 1901 the title was changed to the Hurty- 
Franeis Pharmacy Company, and this was re- 
tained until 1904, when Mr. Francis secured 
the interest of Dr. Hurty in the enterprise, 
which he has since successfully conducted un- 
der the title of the Francis Pharmacy Com- 
pany, being president of the company. Both 
by reason of his insistent personal preference 
and in continuance of the origiual policy on 
which the business was founded, Mr. Francis 
has not permitted commercialism to enter into 
the enterprise to the extent of commending or 
"pushing" proprietary remedies and the mani- 
fold lines of patent medicines, and it is grati- 
fying to the medical profession and to the 
general public that so admirable an establish- 
ment is maintained in Indianapolis as that of 
the Francis Pharmacy Company, — an estab- 
lishment in which the best technical service is 
assured and in which every effort is made to 
liroperly cater to the demands of a large and 
appreciative patronage. Mr. Francis holds 
high prestige as a reliable and progressive 
business man, as an able scientist in his chosen 
field and as a citizen of utmost loyalty and 
public spirit. He has won success through 
worthy means, and that his professional course 
ha? not lacked the highest of endorsement on 
the part of the medical fraternity will be ade- 
quately shown in the several personal esti- 
mates with which this sketch shall be closed. 

In politics Mr. Francis gives a stanch al- 
legiance to the cause of the Republican forces, 
but the turmoil and strife of the political 
arena has had no allurement for him. He re- 
tains membership in the St. George Lutheran 
rhuvch, in Shelby Countv. of which mention 
has Ijeen made in a preceding paragraph, and 
in the time-honored Masonic fraternitv he lia-; 
completed the degrees of the Ancient Accepted 
Scottish Rite, in which he has attained the 
thirtv-second degree, besides being a pnnula'- 
member of Murat Temple, .\ncient Arabic Or- 
der of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He 
holds membership in the University Club, the 
Columbia Club and the German House; is 
affiliated 'with the Kappa Sigma college fra- 



ternity and i.< an honorary member of the XI 
Psi Phi fraternitv. 

On the 28th of August, 1899, was solemn- 
izt'd the marriage of Mr. Francis to Helen 
Dalrymple. who was born and reared at Mor- 
ristown, Indiana, and who is the only child 
of John M. and Mary Ellen (Hargrove) DmI- 
i-.vmple, who now maintain their home in In- 
dianapolis, where Mr. Dalrymple is president 
of the Indianapolis Saddlery Company. He is 
of Scotch lineage and a scion of one of the 
old and patrician families of Virginia, with 
whose historv the name became identified in 
the earlv colonial epoch. .Mr. Dalrvmple i.- a 
zealous supporter of the work of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church in general and in a more 
concrete sense of the Central Avenue iMeth- 
odist Church of Indianapolis, in which both 
he and his wife are zealous members, as is also 
their only daughter, -Mrs. Francis. Mr. Dal- 
rymple has served as a member of the Indiana 
State Board of Charities and his personal 
benevolences and charities have been unosten- 
tatious and well ordered. He donated and en- 
dowed the John M. Dalrymple room in the 
Indiana Methodist Hospital, at Indianapolis. 
He is an honored and influential citizen and 
business man of the capital citv and is promi- 
nently identified wit];! the Masonic fraternity 
as well as with various civic organizations of 
representative order. Mrs. Dalrymple is 
descended in the paternal line from an old and 
prominent family of the State of Maryland, 
whence the original representatives came from 
Scotland. Her maternal ancestors, named 
Smith, early settled in Virginia. Mrs. Francis 
is prominent in connection with the best social 
activities of her home citj', where she enjoys 
distinctive popularity. She is an accomplished 
musician and is identified with musical affairs 
of the best order in Indianapolis, where she is 
also identified with the Federation of Women's 
Clubs, in which she has held various offices. 
She completed her educational work in DePauw 
ITniversity and is a member of the Alpha Chi 
Omega sorority. 

In conclusion of this article are entered state- 
ments, with proper credit to the respective 
source?, concerning the professional and busi- 
ness standing of Mr. Francis, and the estimates, 
emanating from distinguished authorities, bear 
their own significance. 

Dr. William N. Wishard, one of the leading 
physicians and surgeons of Indianapolis, has 
written as follows: "J. R. Francis is a thor- 
oughly scientific pharmacist who makes a con- 
scientious effort toward the hialicst ideals of sci- 
entific dispensing. He is thoroughly trained, 
has an enthusiastic devotion to his work and a 
keen M)ip'reciatinn of the prcsent-dav pliarma- 



746 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



ceutical requircracjits ; he justly deserves the 
high reputation lie bears." 

The tribute of Dr. Charles E. Ferguson is 
as follows: "J. R. J"'rancis is one of the few 
ethical druggists in the state. Graduated in 
pharmacy and in chemistry in Purdue Univer- 
sity, son of a distinguished physician, he came 
to "Indianapolis as chemist for J. N. Hurty. 
lie became Dr. Hurty 's partner, under the 
*h-m name of the Hurty-Francis Pharmacy 
Company, and later succeeded Dr. Hurty. He 
has a most coinplete laboratory, is chemist for 
the Big Four Railway Company. He is a suc- 
cess because the doctors know they can trust 
him. He has trained pharmacists who put n\< 
his prescriptions. The store has always had a 
high reputation for honostv and purity in com- 
l)Ounding prescriptions. Mr. Francis has sus- 
tained the high reputation established by J. N. 
Hurty. He is by nature and by training 
adapted to his profession — this is the secret 
of his success." 

From Dr. Samuel E. Earp, a well known in- 
structor in medical colleges and a writer of 
marked prominence in the domain of his pro- 
fession, comes tlie following emphatic endorse- 
ment: "J. I{. l-'raiicis is a competent, repu- 
table and I'tliiciil plmrniacist, but this is not 
all: tlie lai'.L'c retail drug establishment of 
wliich he is ibi' proprietor has in connection 
witli it a well e(|\ii|ii>i'<l laboratory for the pur- 
pose of staiiilai-di/.iiii; liis stock, and this he 
gives liis ]iersi)iinl sii|i,.rvision. His cautious 
and painstal<ing nietliods are characteristic of 
but few men in artive luisiness life. His thor- 
ongbiiess ill dc-tails witli a view of reaching 
perrectioii is tbe secret of his success." 

|j()T!is A. Grkinkr. D. V. S.. is a distin- 
uiiished i-ejircsentative of a worthy profes- 
sion with which five generations of his fam- 
ily liave been prominently identified, and 
he is reeo!;nized as one of the leading ex- 
ponents of veterinary science in the state, be- 
ing the senior member of the firm of L. A. 
Ci-einer & Son, proprietors of the finely 
equipped Indianapolis Veterinary Infirmary, 
located at 14-16 South Alabama street, and 
also having been founder of the Indiana 
Veterinary College, which he conducted suc- 
cessfully f(^r a period of nine years. He has 
long controlled a large and lucrative profes- 
sional business in Indianapolis, and is a citi- 
zen in every way worthy of the unqualified 
esteem in which he is held in the community. 

Dr. Louis Adolph Greiner is a native of 
that fair German province of Alsace-Lorraine, 
which was wrested from France at the time 
of tlie Franco-Prussian AVar and which was 
still a French province at the time of his 
birth, which there ocenned on the 7th of De- 



cember, 1854. He is a son of Dr. L. A. 
Greiner, who was likewise born in Alsace- 
Lorraine, of stanch German lineage. In 186b 
Dr. L. A. Greiner immigrated with his fam- 
ily to the United States, establishing his home 
in the City of Buffalo, New York, where 
he was engaged in business as a veterinary 
surgeon until 1879, when he removed to In- 
dianapolis, where he has since maintained 
his home and whei-e he has been prominent 
and successful in the work of his profession. 
He died in the y'ear 1889 and his wife died 
in 1907. The father was graduated in the 
Alford Veterinary College, in the City of 
Paris, and for many years was assistant to 
his brother, Dr. William Greiner, who was 
official veterinary surgeon for the Strassburg 
district of Alsace-Lorraine. Dr. Henry Her- 
man Greiner, paternal grandfather of him 
whose name initiates this review, served as 
veterinarian in. the army of the great Napo- 
leon, following that commander in his various 
campaigns and having been with him at Mos- 
cow and Waterloo. 

Dr. Louis A. Greiner secured his rudi- 
mentary education in his native land and was 
a lad of twelve years at the time of the fam- 
ily immiarration to America. He was reared 
to maturity in the City of Bufi'alo, where he 
duly availed himself of the advantages of the 
public schools and also attended the German 
Lutheran Seminary, his parents being devout 
members of the German Lutheran Church. 
He began the study of veterinary science un- 
der the able preceptorship of his honored 
father and had gained thorough and practical 
instruction in the same and engaged in prac- 
tice prior to attaining the age of twenty years. 
He then entered the Philadelphia Veterinary 
College, in which he completed the prescribed 
course and amply fortified himself for the 
work of his profession, to which he has de- 
voted his attention without interruption since 
he was nineteen y^ears of age and in which 
he has added materially to the professional 
prestige of the name which he bears. After 
leaving college, in 1876, he continued in the 
work of his chosen vocation in the City of 
Buffalo until 18S1, when he came to Indian- 
apolis and joined his father, who had here 
taken up his abode two years previously. 

In 1883 Dr. Louis A. Greiner opened the 
Indianapolis Veterinary Infirmary, which he 
has since conducted with unqualified success 
and which has held at all times a large and 
representative patronasre, based on effective 
service and correct business methods. Dr. 
Greiner is the acknovvledired leader in his 
profession in this city, and his technical skill 
is of the highest order. In 1892 he estab- 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



lished the Indiana Veterinary College, which 
he conducted for nine years and which he 
brought to a high state of efficiency, having 
graduated in the institution seventy students, 
all of whom have been successful in their 
profession. Impaired health and the exact- 
ing demands of his own professional work 
finally compelled Dr. Greiner to retire from 
the educational establishment which he had 
thus founded. Concerning the doctor and his 
work the following pertinent statements are 
worthy of reproduction in this publication: 
"Associated with Dr. Greiner in his exten- 
sive business are his son, Dr. Joseph M. 
Greiner, tv/o assistants and several laborers. 
Facilities for their work are complete and 
of the best modern type. The latest devices 
and methods are utilized and no expense is 
spared in rendering the appointments of the 
infirmary first-class in every respect. Dr. 
Greiner has been the city veterinarian of 
Indianapolis for a number of years and is 
now incumbent of that position. He does all 
the veterinary work for the Consumers' Ice 
Companj', Sterling R. Holt Ice & Cold Stor- 
age Company, the Sterling R. Holt stock 
farm at Maywood, the Indianapolis Street 
Railway Company, the Standard Oil Com- 
pany and other large and important con- 
cerns. His private pra£tice is very large and 
lucrative. During the proper season he has 
in operation the Indiana School for Farriers, 
designed to teach, in the most practical man- 
ner, scientific shoeing for horses,— particu- 
larly driving and racing animals". Dr. 
Greiner is associated with the Terre Haute 
Veterinary College of which he is vice-presi- 
dent and professor of cattle pathology and 
lamenes.s and shoeing. 

Dr. Greiner takes a loyal interest in all 
that touches the welfare of his home city and 
is essentially public-spirited in his attitude. 
He is a member of the German Orphans' 
Home Society, is a stalwart supporter of the 
cause of the Democratic party, in which con- 
nection he is identified with Marion County 
Democratic Club and the German American 
Democratic Club of this city. He and his 
wife hold membership in the First Lutheran 
Church, and, in addition to various social 
organizations, he is identified with the Scot- 
tish Rite and Shrine of the Masonic frater- 
nity, the Benevolent & Protective Order of 
Elks, the Knights of Pythias, and the I. 0. 
H. F., and is a Tuember of the State Veteri- 
nary Association. 

In the City of Bufl:alo, New York, in 1874, 
Dr. Greiner wa.s united in marriage to Miss 
Magdalena Pollock, who was there born, 
reared and educated, and of the six children 



of this union four are now living,— Georgina 
is now the wife of John J. Ray, a represen- 
tative contractor and builder of Indianapolis; 
Adolph died in infancy; Dr. Joseph Milton 
is associated with his father' in business, as 
already noted; Leonora is the wife of Fred- 
erick H. Nuerge, a successful contractor and 
builder of this city; Magdalena died in in- 
fancy; and Louis Adolph, Jr., is also con- 
nected with his father. 

Charles 0. Harris, a popular citizen and 
native son of Indianapolis, is the present able 
incumbent of the office of chief deputy coun- 
ty treasurer of Marion County, and he is 
well entitled to the recognition accorded him 
in this sketch. Charles Orville Harris was 
born in Indianapolis, on the 11th of August, 
1865, and is a son of Charles E. and Hannah 
W. (Yockum) Harris, both of whom are na- 
tives of Ohio, whence they removed to In- 
dianapolis, where they have maintained their 
home for fully half a century. Charles E. 
Harris is a scion of stanch Holland Dutch 
ancestry, and family tradition, well authenti- 
cated, records that four brothers of the name 
immigrated from Holland to America at a 
very early date, two of the number settling 
in Pennsylvania and the other two locating 
in the south. From one of the two who set- 
tled in Pennsylvania the subject of this re- 
view traces his lineage in direct line of 
descent. Representatives of the name left the 
old Keystone state and became pioneers of 
Ohio, and there Charles E. Harris, father of 
the subject of this review, was born and 
reared. There also was solemnized his mar- 
riage to Miss Hannah W. Yockum, and about 
1861 thej' took up their residence in Indian- 
apolis, where they have since maintained 
their home, being numbered among the ven- 
erable and highly esteemed citizens of the 
fair capital city, which they have seen grow 
from a village to its present magnificent 
status. On the 25th of December, 1908, they 
celebrated their golden wedding anniversary, 
and the occasion was made a memorable one 
by the gathering of a large assembly of their 
friends and by messages and other tokens 
of the high regard in which they are held in 
the city which has so long been their home. 
Mr. Harris is now living retired, after having 
for many years been engaged in business as 
a contractor and builder. 

Charles 0. Harris was reared to maturity 
in Indianapolis and here he completed the 
curriculum of the public schools, including a 
course in the high school. Soon after leaving 
school he became a traveling salesman for the 
Brooks Oil Company, of Cleveland, Ohio, and 
later he became traveling representative for 



748 



HISTOBY OF GKEATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



the W. B. Barry Saw Company, of Indian- 
apolis. In 1890 he assumed a similar posi- 
tion with E. C. Atkins & Company, the ex- 
tensive and well known saw manufacturers 
of Indianapolis, and after leaving the em- 
ploy of this concern he was for eight years 
incumbent of the position of inspector of 
rates, weights and commodities for the rail- 
road joint bureau covering these matters in 
Indianapolis. On the 1st of January, 1900, 
Mr. Harris accepted a position in the office 
of the treasurer of Marion County, and he 
has since been closely identified with its work, 
having retained his connection under the 
various regimes and having in this the best 
and all-sufficient voucher for his ability and 
for the inviolable confidence reposed in him. 
Since 1903 he has served as chief deputy 
treasurer, and he acts as general cashier for 
the office. He is one of the vf^lued officials 
of the county and his courtesy and careful 
discharge of the responsible duties of his 
present office have gained to him unqualified 
commendation. 

Mr. Harris has ever been a stalwart sup- 
porter of the cause of the Republican party 
and has been an active worker in its ranks. 
He is a member of the Marion and Commer- 
cial Clubs and is affiliated with the Knights 
of Pythias. 

In 1885 Mr. Harris was united in marriage 
to Miss Edith Heitkam, of Indianapolis, and 
they have two children,— Fern and Albert. 
The pleasant family home, at 2427 Central 
avenue, is one notable for its gracious hos- 
pitality, and is a favored rendezvous for a 
wide circle of friends, both young and old. 

Mrdford B. Wilson. Among the monetarv 
institutions which emphasize and exert marked 
influence in conserving the financial stability 
and commercial prestige of the capital city of 
Indiana, a position of prominence and rela- 
tive priority is held by the Columbia National 
Bank, of which Mr. Wilson is president. He 
is known as one of the able and discriminating 
financiers of Indiana, where he has been actively 
identified with banking interests for virtually 
two score of years. 

Mr. Wilson was born in the village of Pales- 
tine, Crawford County, Illinois, on the 8th of 
December, 1845, and is a son of Isaac N. and 
Hannah Harness (Decker) Wilson, honored 
pioneers of that section of Illinois, where they 
continued to reside until their death. The 
father became one of the prominent and influ- 
ential business men of Crawford County and 
was a citizen to whom was ever accorded the 
fullest measure of popular confidence and es- 
teem, lie was a native of Morefield, West 
Virginia, and his wife was bom at Romnev. 



that state, about fifteen miles distant from his 
birthplace. The lineage of the Wilson family 
is of stanch Scotch-Irish derivation and the 
original progenitor in America was a clergy- 
man of the Presbyterian Church, who came 
from Belfast to the new world in the colonial 
epoch of our national history. In the ma- 
ternal line the genealogy of Medford B. Wilson 
is traced back to sferling Holland Dutch stock, 
and the Decker family was likewise founded 
in America in an- early day. An uncle of Mrs. 
Isaac Wilson was on the first grand jury ever 
held in the territory . of Indiana. His name 
was Decker. The two priests who founded the 
Catholic University in Washington were also 
uncles of Mrs. Wilson. Isaac N. Wilson was 
reared in his native state and was a young man 
at the time of his parents' removal to Illinois, 
in 1816. To the same state his wife came with 
lier parents in the following year, and their 
marriage was solemnized in that state. Isaac 
N. and Hannah H. Wilson became the parents 
of nine sons and one, daughter, of whom the 
subject of this sketch was the seventh in order 
of birth, and of the number three are now 
living. 

Medford B. Wilson was reared to maturity 
in his native town, where he gained his early 
educational discipline, which included a course 
in a local academy. His father's financial 
status was such that the children were accorded 
excellent' educational advantages, and after 
leaving the academy Medford B. was matricu- 
lated in Vincennes University, at Vincennes. 
Indiana, where he was a student for two years. 
He then went abroad and entered the univer- 
sity at Marburg, Hesse Cassel, Germany, where 
lie completed a four years' course in commer- 
cial law and was duly graduated. In the mean- 
while he had thoroughly familiarized himself 
with the German language, which he speaks 
with utmost fluency. 

Mr. Wilson returned to the United States in 
1870 and located in Sullivan, Indiana, in which 
village, the judicial center of the county of 
the same name, he established the first bank, 
which was at first known as the Sullivan 
County Bank and which was incorporated un- 
der the state banking laws. Eventually the 
institution was reorganized as the First Na- 
tional Rank, and IMr. Wilson continued presi- 
dent of the latter until his removal to Indian- 
apolis, having been thus concerned with bank- 
ing business in Sullivan County for more than 
twenty years, within which he established a 
high reputation for initiative and executive 
abilitv and sterling integrity- of character. 

In December, 1889. Jfr. Wilson took up his 
residence in Indianapolis. ^^J^ere he forthwith 
effected the organization of the Capital Na- 




^H.^ 



J^fiLOii^Ti^ 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



749 



tional Bank, which was incorporated in Decem- 
ber, 1889, with a capital stock of $300,000. 
He was the president of this institution from 
the time of its inception until January, 1904, 
when he disposed of his stock and resigned 
his official position, to accept the presidency 
of the Columbia National Bank, of which he 
has since been the able and popular e.xecutive 
head. He is one of tlie well known bankers 
of the state and his name stands exponent of 
tine technical knowledge, correct methods and 
wise conservatism in the handling and man- 
agement of financial affairs. As a citizen he 
is essentially loyal and public-spirited and while 
he has never had aught of ambition for polit- 
ical office he gi^jes a stalwart support to the 
cause of the Democratic party. He and his 
wife are members of the First Presbyterian 
Church of Indianapolis. In the Masonic fra- 
ternity Mr. Wilson has attained to the thirty- 
second degree of the Ancient Accepted Scottish 
Rite, in which connection he is identified with 
the consistory of the A'alley of Indianapolis, 
where his York Rite affiliations also are main- 
tained and where he is also identified with 
Murat Temple, Ancient Arabic Order of the 
Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He is a valued 
mem-ber of the Indianapolis Board of Trade 
and holds membership in the Commercial, ITni- 
versity and Country Clubs, representative or- 
ganizations of the capital city, where he is 
held An high esteem in both business and social 
circles. 

In 1872 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. 
Wilson to Miss Nettie A. Ames, who was born 
at Geneva, Ohio, and reared in Detroit, Michi- 
gan, and Cleveland, Ohio, of wliich latter city 
she was a resident at the time of her marriage. 
Mr. and Mrs. Wilson have five daughters. 
Daisey married Frank F. Churchman, of ■ In- 
dianapolis; Sarah is the wife of James L. 
Floyd, of Indianapolis; Ruth married George 
M. "B. Hawlev, of Geneva, New York ; Edith 
is the wife of William H. Stafford, of In- 
dianapolis ; and Clare lives at home. 

James M. BERRTHn.i,, a leading attorney 
of Indianapolis, and an active member of the 
firm of Remy & Berryhill, is a native of the 
Hoosier state, born in Lebanon, Boone Coub- 
ty, August 31, 1869. He is a son of William 
0. and Mary A. I'Riley) Berryhill, both na- 
tives of Indiana. The father was a drug- 
gist and ambitions, for he had prepared him- 
self to enter the practice of medicine just be- 
fore his death, when James M. was seven 
years of age. He left a widow and five chil- 
dren. The mother continued to reside in 
Lebanon, where she faithfully applied herself 
to the rearing and education of her children, 
biit she did not herself live long enough to 



fully realize the good fruit of her labors, as 
her death occurred when James M. was fif- 
teen years of age. 

Mr. Berryhill was educated in the public 
and high schools of Lebanoii, and was grad- 
uated from the latter in May, 1887. He then 
taught in the country schools of the neigh- 
borhood for a year and in the fall of 1888 
entered Franklin (Indiana) College, from 
which he was graduated in June, 1892, with 
the degree of B. S. For the succeeding four 
years he served as the deputy clerk of the 
Boone County circuit courts, giving all his 
spare moments to the study of law. In Oc- 
tober, 1896, he became a student in the In- 
diana Law School, Indianapolis, from which 
he was graduated in May, 1897, having been 
admitted to the bar at Lebanon during the 
previous year. On graduating from the In- 
diana Law School he was admitted to prac- 
tice before the state Supreme and Federal 
courts, as well as before all the courts of 
Marion County. His actual practice in In- 
dianapolis dates from October, 1896, the year 
previous to his graduation from the Indiana 
Law School. 

In his important and growing practice Mr. 
Berryhill was first associated with the Hol- 
stein, Barrett and Hubbard law firm of which 
he later became a member. Mr. Barrett re- 
tiring, the style of the firm become Holstein, 
Hubbard and Berryhill. "Mr. Hubbard sub- 
sequently withdrew, and the firm remained 
Holstein and Berryhill nmtil January, 1901, 
when it was dissolved by the death of Major 
Holstein. Mr. Berryhill continued in prac- 
tice alone until January, 1905, when he 
formed a partnership with his present asso- 
ciate, Charles F. Remy. Alone and in as- 
sociation with his partner, Mr. Berryhill has 
been connected in large important litigations. 
Among the late honors conferred upon him 
was his appointment in June^ 1907, as per- 
manent guardian of the celebrated George 
Rodius estate. It came to him quite un- 
solicited and in making the appointment 
Judge Samuel R. Artman of the Boone Cir- 
cuit Court made the following declaration: 
"The man whom I shall appoint is one whose 
character no person can question. He is hon- 
est; I know he is. When I name him, I am 
sure all parties concerned will be satisfied. 
I shall appoint James M. Berryhill of Indian- 
apolis, who had the srood sense to be born in 
Boone County". In making the appointment 
Judge Artman fixed the bond of the guardian 
at $150,000, which is an evidence of the finan- 
oial responsibility of the profession. Mr. 
Berryhill is an active and leading member 
of the Indiana State and Indianapolis Bar 



rrjo 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



Associations and takes just pride in enrollinir 
himself as a member of the Sons of Veterans. 
One of the brave acts of his talented father 
was his enlistment as a Union soldier in the 
Tenth Indiana Regiment, his service of one 
year and four months being terminated only 
by his physical disability to endure army 
hardships. But later, however, he re-enlisted 
in the Eleventh Cavalry of the One Hundreil 
and Twenty-sixth Infantry Regiment, and 
served one year and a half or to. the close of 
the war. This patriotic service it will be re- 
membered was rendered several years before 
the birth of James M. Mr. Berryhill is an 
active member of many organizatiofis outside 
those which are connected with his profes- 
sion, being identified with the Century Lit- 
erary Club and other associations of a re- 
rined nature. In 1895 he was married to 
Miss Edith Craft, of Franklin, Indiana, and 
their two children are Esther and Edwin. 

Howard Kimball has been a resident of 
Indianapolis and identified with its business 
interests for nearh' forty j-ears, and for more 
than two decades he has held his present re- 
sponsible executive office as secretary of the 
Aetna Savings & Loan Association, one of the 
important concerns of its kind in the middle 
states of the Union. He is a scion of one 
of the old and honored families of New Eng- 
land, where the original American progenitor 
took up his abode in the early part of the 
seventeenth centurj". The name has been 
identified in a prominent way with the vari- 
ous wars in which the nation has been in- 
volved, and it has ever stood for the highest 
type of citizenship, as one generation ha.s fol- 
lowed another on to the stage of life. Th\is 
the subject of this review has an ancestral 
heritage of which he may well be proud, for 
none can atford to hold in light esteem those 
who have wrousrht nobly in the past, leaving 
records of worthy lives and worthy deeds. 

Howard Kimball has the distinction of 
being a native son of the City of Boston, IMas- 
sachusetts, where he was born on the 23rd of 
June, 1845, and is a son of Warren and Ann 
(Baker) Kimball, both natives of Ipswich. 
Massachusetts, where the former was born on 
the 22nd of IVTarch, 1812. and the latter on the 
3rd of July, 1814. The father was a resident 
of Indian Territory at the time of his death, 
and the mother died on the 14th of June, 
1895, at Indianapolis. Of their eight chil- 
dren Howard was the fourth in order of birth, 
and is the second in age of the three now 
snrvivinsr. His sister, Annie, is the wife of 
Captain "William TI. AVhite, of Junction City, 
Kansas, and his brother. Harry S., is a resi- 
dent of the City of Chicago. 



Warren Kimball received such advantages 
as were afforded in the common schools of 
the locality in which he was i-eared, and his 
initial business experience was gained in the 
general country store of Daniel Coggswell, 
of Ipswich, Massachusetts, with whom he re- 
mained as a trusted employe until he had at- 
tained to his legal majority. He then went 
to the City of Boston, where he engaged in 
the grocery and provision business on his own 
account, building up a thriving enterprise 
and having derived specially large returns 
from his transactions in shipping of produce 
and supplies from Boston to San Francisco 
in the early days of the gold excitement in 
California, in the '50s. He continued to be 
identified with mercantile interests in Boston 
for a number of years and later held an ex- 
ecutive position in that city in the employ 
of the Vermont Central Railroad. In politics 
he was originally an old-line Whig, but he 
identified himself with the Republican party 
at the time of its organization and ever after- 
ward continued a strong advocate of its prin- 
ciples and policies. He was a leader in its 
local ranks in the early days and assisted in 
the organization of the first "Wide Awake 
Club" in Boston, an organization formed for 
the purpose of promoting the interests of 
the party in the historic campaign which re 
suited in the election of Abraham Lincoln to 
the presidency. During the first term of 
President Lincoln, Mr. Kimball held the ap- 
pointment of weigher and ganger in the 
TTnited States custom house in Boston. He 
was a member of the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows and was a pewholder and sup- 
porter of the old Park Street Church in the 
City of Boston, of which his wife was a de- 
voted member. 

Warren Kimball was a son of Benjamin 
and Huldah (Wade) Kimball. His father 
was born in Ipswich, Massachusetts, on the 
3rd of November, 1786, and his death occurred 
on the 29th of October. 1867. Benjamin Kim- 
ball and Huldah Wade were united in mar- 
riage on the 16th of April, 1807, and she died 
on the 3rd of December, 1813. On the 29th 
of November, 1815, he married Miss Priscilla 
Kimball, who was born Augiist 8, 1784, and 
who died December 18, 1872. She was a 
daughter of Jeremiah Kimball, of Ipswich. 
Benjamin Kimball was for many years en- 
gaged in the lumber business on the Ipswich 
River, where he operated a saw-mill, and he 
was one of the prominent and influential men 
of his community. He reared a large family 
of children, and his descendants are now to 
be found in the most diverse sections of the 
I'nion. His father. Benjamin Kimball, Sr., 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



751 



who was a sergeant and aide-de-camp in the 
Massachusetts militia and who was a valiant 
soldier in the War of the Revolution, in 
which at least thirteen members of this an- 
cient family were enrolled as patriot de- 
fenders of the cause of independence, fight- 
ing bravely to hurl oppression back and keep 
the boon of liberty. The original progenitor 
of the Kimball family in America was Rich- 
ard Kimball, who, with his family, embarked 
at Ipswich, Suffolk Countv, England, on the 
10th of April, 1634, on the ship "Elizabeth", 
William Anderson, master, and set sail for 
the far distant land of promise. The ves- 
sel landed in the harbor of Boston, and from 
that point Richard Kimball proceeded with 
his family to "VVatertown. Massachusetts, 
whence he later removed to Ipswich, where 
he engaged in the work of his trade, that 
of carriage and wagon-making. The first 
stone bridge built in the United States was 
erected in Ipswich, Massachusetts, by a mem- 
ber of the Choate family, of which the mother 
of the subject of this review was a collateral 
representative. Itfembers of the Kimball fam- 
ily were also represented in the early colonial 
wars, not less than eight bearing this name 
or that of Kemble, the spelling retained by 
certain branches, having participated in King 
Philip 's War and in other conflicts marking 
the early history of our nation. The services 
of some of these are mentioned in the re- 
cently published history of the Kimball fam- 
ily. Caleb, Henry and Richard Kimball are 
shown to have been in the historic ambuscade 
at Bloody Brook, and Thomas KimbaU was 
massacred at his home in Bradford, Massa- 
chusetts. 

Howard Kimball was reared to maturity 
in the classic old city of his birth and in the 
schools of "the Hub" he received excellent 
educational advantages in his boyhood and 
early youth. As a lad he secured employ- 
ment in the office of a file factory in Boston, 
and for his services during the first year he 
received the dignified stipend of fifty dollars, 
which amount was doubled the second year. 
He was engaged with this concern about four 
years. He held a clerical oosition with this 
firm until he had reached the age of eighteen 
years, when his ambition and venturesome 
spirit led him to start for the west. He made 
his way to Leavenworth, Kansas, which was 
then an important frontier town and govern- 
ment post, on the route followed by many of 
those making their way across the plains to 
Colorado, Montana and other sections of the 
erreat west. In Leavenworth he became book- 
teener in the book and stationery establish- 
ment of Drake Brothers, in whose employ he 



continued for three years, at the expiration 
of which he engaged independently in the 
book and stationery business in Leavenworth. 
After passing ten years in Kansas he dis- 
posed of his interests there and came to In- 
dianapolis, where he took up his residence in 
the year 1875 and where he has maintained 
his home during the long intervening years, 
marked by earnest application and worthy 
accomplishment on his part. Here he entered 
the service of the Franklin Life Insurance 
Company, later was identified with the Ma- 
sonic Mutual Life Insurance Company, of 
Indianapolis, and in 1888 he became secretary 
of the Aetna Savings & Loan Association, of 
which ofSce he has since remained in tenure, 
having administered the affairs of the asso- 
ciation with marked ability and discrimina- 
tion and having gained an impregnable place 
in the confidence and -regard of the commu- 
nity which has so long represented his home 
and been the center of his interests. 

Though never manifesting aught of ambi- 
tion for political office, Mr. Kimball has ever 
given an unswerving allegiance to the cause 
of the Republican party. In 1910 he was ap- 
pointed to the office of city controller, which 
office he is now filling. In the time-honored 
Masonic fraternity IV^r. Kimball has main- 
tained a deep and appreciative interest from 
the time of affiliating himself therewith. He 
IS a member of Oriental Lodge, No. 500, Free 
and Accepted Masons, of which he served as 
secretary for ten years: Keystone Chapter, 
No. 6, Royal Arch Masons, of which he is 
secretary; Raper Commandery, No. 1, 
Knights Templars, of which he is the present 
recorder; and Murat Temple, Ancient Arabic 
Order of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. 

Mr. Kimball was married to Sallie M. Hurt, 
a daughter of John and Mary Hurt of Ken- 
tucky. Mrs. Kimball died. The child of this 
union, Arthur W., is now living in Columbus, 
Ohio. 

On the 4th of September, 1895, Mr. Kim- 
ball was united in marriage to Miss Emma J. 
Anthony, who was born at Troy, Ohio, on the 
7th of September; 1861, a daughter of Daniel 
and Rachel (Wadsworth) Anthony. The 
father was born in the State of Maryland and 
sacrificed his life while serving as a soldier in 
the Civil War. His widow is still living and 
now resides in the home of Mr. and Mrs. Kim- 
ball, who accord to her the deepest affection 
and solicitude. Mr. and Mrs. Kimball have 
one child, Alice. 

CH.A.RLES C. Perry. For nearly a quarter 
of a century, Charles C. Perry, of Indianap- 
olis, has been connected with some form of 
electrical industries, and at the present time 



IIISTOEY OP GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



liolds the placf oi' president of the Indian- 
apolis Light and Heat Company. A native of 
liichmond, \A'ayne County, Indiana, he was 
born December 15, 1857. His father was Dr. 
Joseph James Perry, long ranlced among the 
notable physicians of Indiana. The faraily 
was long established in Somersetshire, England, 
where the doctor received his medical educa- 
tion. Coming to America in IS-tO, he first 
located at Detroit, Michigan, and for ten years 
conducted a growing practice in* that city. In 
1850 he moved to Richmond, Indiana, where 
he remained until his death in 1872. During 
this period he served in the Civil War, being 
appointed as surgeon in 1864 in the Forty- 
second United States Infantry. He continued 
with that command until his regiment was 
mustered out, afterwards he returned to Rich- 
mond and resumed the work of his profession. 
In his capacity as a religious member of the 
community, he was a founder of the Grace 
Methodist Episcopal Church at Richmond, and 
during the entire period of his residence in 
that city was an officer of the organization. 
The deceased was twice married, secondly to 
Miss Ruth Moffitt, born at Richmond in 1821. 

Charles C, the only child of the second 
marriage, was educated in the Richmond pub- 
lic schools and at the Earlham College of that 
place. At an early period in his boyhood he 
developed strong business talents, which first 
were demonstrated by his success as a vender 
of city newspapers. His next venture was as 
a messenger boy for the Pittsburg, Cincinnati, 
Chicago & St. Louis Railway, and was soon dili- 
gently applying himself to the mastery of tel- 
egraphy. With this latter aeeomplishment he 
rose from one position to the other, until he 
reached the managership of the Western Union 
Telegraph Company at Richmond, retaining 
that position between the years 1880 to 1884. 
In 1886, Mr. Perry came to Indianapolis as 
representative of the Jenny Electric Company ; 
in 1888, he became one of the financiers of the 
Marmon-Perry Light Company, and was also 
one of the organizers of the Indianapolis Light 
and Power Company, in 1892, which is now 
known as the Indianapolis Light and Heat 
Company, since 1904. Of the latter he is 
now president and treasiirer and perhaps the 
most active promoter. In politics he is a Re- 
publican and is an active member of the In- 
dianapolis Board of Trade and the Commercial 
and Coluipbia Club?. He is also a trustee of 
the Y. W. C. A. ^fr. Perrv was married to 
Miss Capitola Adams, a daughter of T. J, 
Adams, of Indianapolis. 

John J. Kyle, M. D. ,A specialist in the 
treatment; of the diseases of the eye, ear, nose 
and throat, Dr. John J. Kyle is one of the 



representative physicians and surgeons of th^; 
capital eitj', where he has been engaged in 
the practice of his profession since 1899. Dr. 
Kyle was born in the City of Aurora, Dear- 
born County, Indiana, and is a son of Dr. 
Thomas M. and Anna (Johnson) Kyle, both 
likewise natives of Dearborn County and rep- 
resentatives of honored pioneer families of 
the state. The lineage of the Kyle family is 
traced back to Scotch-Irish derivation and 
that of the Johnson family to stanch Scotch 
stock. Dr. Thomas M. Kyle became one of 
the successful physicians and surgeons of his 
native county and was engaged in the prac- 
tice of his profession at Aurora for a quarter 
of a century. He was a graduate of the 
Miami Medical College, of Cincinnati, and 
was a man of marked ability in his profes- 
sion. 

After completing the curriculum of the 
public schools of his native town Dr. John J. 
Kyle was a student in Moore's Hill College, 
in Dearborn County, Indiana, for three years, 
and he then entered his father's alma mater, 
Miami Medical CoUege, in which he was grad- 
uated as a member of the class of 1890, and 
from which he duly received his degree of 
Doctor of Medicine. He passed the following 
year in effective post-graduate study jn the 
medical department of the University of Ber- 
lin, Germany, and upon his return to Indiana 
he located at Marion, where he was engaged 
in the active work of his profession for about 
six years. At the outbreak of the Spanish- 
American War Dr. Kyle received a commis- 
sion as major surgeon of the One Hundred 
and Sixtieth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, 
which was made up of the Fourth Regiment 
of the Indiana National Guard, in which lat- 
ter he has served as lieutenant in the line, 
later as captain, and finally as assistant sur- 
geon, from which office he was promoted to 
that of major surgeon at the time when the 
regiment was mustered into the service of the 
United States. Dr. Kyle continued in active 
service with his regiment for one year, from 
April 24, 1898, to May 1, 1899, and five 
months of this period were passed at Matan- 
zas, Cuba. While with his command in the 
reserve camp at Columbus, Georgia, Dr. Kyle 
built and equipped the brigade hospital of 
the First Brigade, Second Division, First 
Army Corps, and so effectively did he accom- 
plish this work that he was specially compli- 
rtiented by the division commander. General 
Joseph R. Sanger. On the 1st of May, 1899, 
Dr. Kyle was mustered out with his regi- 
ment, and he received his honorable discharge 
with the rank of major. 

In October, 1899, Dr.' Kyle opened an office 



HISTOKY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



753 



m Indianapolis, and here he has since devoted 
his attention specially to the treatment of the 
.diseases of the eye, ear, nose and throat, in 
ivhich he is an authority. In the line of this 
special branch of professional work he also 
holds the professorship of such diseases in 
the Indiana University Medical College. He 
IS also a member of the medical staff of the 
Indianapolis City Hospital, St. Vincent's Hos- 
pital and the Bobbs Free Dispensary. He is 
the author of two valuable works on the dis- 
eases of the ear, nose and throat, and these 
books have met with most favorable reception 
on the part of the medical fraternity. In 
April, 1909, President Taft conferred upon 
Dr. Kyle appointment as First Lieutenant in 
the Medical Reserve Corps of the United 
States Army. He is a member of the Indian- 
apolis Medical Society, the Indiana State 
Medical Society, the American Medical As- 
sociation, the American Academy of Ophthal- 
mology and Otolaryngology, fellow of the 
American Larj'ngologieal, Rhinological and 
Otological Society. He is also a member of 
the American Geographical Society, the As- 
sociation of Officers of Foreign "Wars, and the 
Veterans of the Spanish-American War. In 
the IMasonic fraternity Dr. Kyle has attained 
to the Thirty-second degree of the Ancient 
Accepted Scottish Rite, and is also affiliated 
with Murat Temple, Ancient Arabic Order 
of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. In hi^ 
home city he holds membership in the Colum- 
bia. Country and University Clubs, and his 
political allegiance is given to the Republican 
party. 

Daniel W.\it Ho"we. The bench and bar 
of Indiana have been honored and dignified 
through the life and services of Judge Howe, 
who is now engaged in the successful practice 
of his profession in Indianapolis, where he 
formerly served with distinction on the bench 
of the Superior Court. He is a veteran of 
the Ci^al War, is a member of one of the old 
and honored families of Indiana, of which 
he is a native son, and furthermore is a scion 
of a family that was founded in America 
about the middle of the seventeenth century. 
The name has been prominently identified 
with the annals of American history during 
the long intervening years, and representa- 
tives of the family have been found enrolled 
as patriot soldiers in the various wars in 
which the nation has been involved. 

Daniel Wait Howe was born in the village 
of Patriot, Switzerland County, Indiana, on 
the 24th of October, 1839. and is the only 
child of Daniel Haven Howe and Lucy 
I'Hicks) Howe. His father was a native of 
the State of New York, where he was reared 



and educated, and from Salamanca, that 
state, he came to Indiana about the year 1835, 
settling at Patriot, where he engaged in the 
lumber business, with which he continued to 
be identified until his death, which occurred 
in 1842. He was a son of Nathan Howe, who 
was captain in a New York regiment in the 
War of 1812 and who continued to reside in 
the old Empire state until his death. Two 
members of the family in direct line of de- 
scent to the subject of this review were val- 
iant soldiers in the Continental line during 
the War of the Revolution, Captain Eliakim 
Howe and his son Otis having served in the 
New Hampshire militia. Colonel Thomas 
Howe, another ancestor, was an active par- 
ticipant in King Philip's Indian War. The 
original American progenitor was John Howe, 
who came from England to the colony of 
Massachusetts and who was a resident of 
Sudbury about IG.'VT. 

After the death of her first husband the 
mother of Judge Howe became the wife of 
Colonel Samuel P. Oyler, and in 1850 they 
took up their residence in Franklin, Johnson 
County, Indiana, where Colonel Oyler en- 
gaged in the practice of law, having been one 
of the able and honoj-ed members of the bar 
of the state for many years. In the Civil 
War he served as major of the Seventh In- 
diana Volunteer l^ifantry, and feter he be- 
came lieutenant colonel of the Seventy-ninth 
Indiana Volunteer Infantry. After the ter- 
mination of his service, he resumed the prac- 
tice of his profession at Franklin and he 
served for several years as judge of the Cir- 
cuit Court, in ' addition to which he repre- 
sented his district for four years in the state 
Senate. He was prominent in both the 
Knights of Pythias, in which he was honored 
with the office of grand chancellor, and in the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, in which 
he served as grand master of the Grand Lodge 
of Indiana. He died in 1898, and his widow 
thereafter maintained her home with her son, 
Judge Howe, in Indianapolis, where she died 
in 1904, a woman of gracious personality and 
one who was revered by all who came within 
the circle of her gentle influence. She was a 
native of the State of New York, whence her 
parents. Solomon and Lucy (Butts) Hicks, 
removed to Indiana in 1826. Her father was 
a member of a New York regiment in the 
War of 1812. 

Judge Daniel W. Howe gained his prelim- 
inary education in the common schools of his 
native state, after which he entered Franklin 
College, at Franklin, this state, in which in- 
stitution he was graduated as a member of 
the class of 1857 and from which he received 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



the degree of Bachelor of Arts. During the 
winters of 1858 and 1859 he devoted his at- 
tention to teaching in the public schools, 
and in the following winter he attended a 
course of lectures in a law school in Indian- 
apolis. The call to higher duty came to him 
soon afterward, when the integrity of the na- 
tion was thrown into jeopardy by armed re- 
bellion, and, subordinating all personal inter- 
ests, he was among the loyal sons of Indiana 
who responded to President Lincoln's first 
call for volunteers. In April, 1861, he en- 
listed as a private in the Seventh Indiana 
Volunteer Infantry, of which his honored 
stepfather became major, and he was in active 
service for three months, in West Virginia, 
where he participated in the battle of Car- 
rick's Ford. After the expiration of his first 
term of enlistment he became a member of 
the Seventy-ninth Indiana Volunteer Infan- 
try, entering the same as first lieutenant of 
Company I. of which he was later promoted 
captain. With this gallant command he 
made a record of most faithful and gallant 
service as a loyal soldier of the republic, hav- 
ing taken part in the battles of Stone's River, 
Chickamauga and Missionary Ridge, and also 
in the East Tennessee campaign and the ever 
memorable Atlanta campaign. He was made 
the subject of special compliment in the offi- 
cial reports for meritorious service in the bat- 
tle of Missionary Ridge. He was severely 
wounded in an engagement at Kenesaw Moun- 
tain, Georgia, on the 23rd of June, 1864, and 
being thus incapacitated for further active 
service in the field, he received his honorable 
discharge on the 10th of the following No- 
vember. His continued interest in his old 
comrades in arms is signified bj^ his member- 
ship in the Grand Army of the Republic, in 
which patriotic order he is affiliated with 
George H, Thomas Post, No. 17, of Indian- 
apolis. 

After the close of the war Judge Howe re- 
sumed his study of the law, in connection 
with which work of preparation he was finally 
matriculated in Albany Law School, in the 
capital city of New York, in which institu- 
tion he was graduated in 1867, with the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Laws. He was forthwith 
admitted to the bar of his native state and 
he initiated his professional career by enter- 
ing into partnership with his stepfather. Col- 
onel Oyer, with whom ho was associated in 
practice at Franldin, Indiana, for several 
years, within which he amply justified his 
choice of vocation. He was called upon tn 
serve as city attorney of Franklin and also 
mndo nn excellent record as prosecuting at- 



torney of Johnson County, of which position 
he was incumbent for two years. 

In 1873, desiring a wider field of action iu 
his profession. Judge Howe removed to In- 
dianapolis, of whose bar he has since con- 
tinued a representative member. In 1876 he 
was elected a judge of the Superior Court, 
and he continued to preside on the bench un- 
til 1890, since which time he has given his 
attention to the general practice of his pro- 
fession, in connection with which his clientage 
is of distinctively representative order. On 
the bench he evinced the highest judicial 
acumen and his decisions were marked by 
broad and comprehensive knowledge of the 
law and full appreciation of the equity in- 
volved in the varied causes presented for his 
adjudication. In neither his professional 
career or private life has there been aught of 
obliquity or indirection, and none holds a 
more secure place in the confidence and es- 
teem of the bar and the general public. Judge 
Howe has much felicity in diction, both as a 
speaker and writer, commanding a clear and 
forceful English of classical purity. He has 
been president of the Indiana Historical So- 
ciety since 1901 and his interest in its affairs 
is of the most insistent and helpful order. 
He is also a member of the New England 
Historic-Genealogical Society, and has served 
as president of the Indianapolis Bar Associa- 
tion. His literary productions have included 
various books and pamphlets, and among 
these it may be noted that he is author of the 
"Puritan Republic", published in 1899, and 
of "Civil War Times", a most valuable and 
interesting historical volume, published in 
1902. For some time past he has been giving 
attention to the compilation of the genealogi- 
cal history of the Howe family in connection 
with which his researches have been wide 
and intimate. In politics he is a Republican. 
In his religious faith he inclines to that of 
the Congregational Church, the church of his 
ancestors, and in the time-honored Masonic 
fraternity he has attained the Knight Tem- 
plar degree in the York-Rite and Thirty-sec- 
ond degree of the Ancient Accepted Scottish 
Rite. 

In 1871, while a resident of Franklin, In- 
diana, Judge Howe was lanited in marriage 
to Miss Inez Hamilton, daughter of Robert 
A. and Susan ( Saunders ~i Hamilton, who 
came from Kentucky to Indiana, in which 
latter state Mrs. Howe was born. The Ham- 
ilton genealogy is traced back to stanch 
Scotch-Irish origin and the original repre- 
sentative in America settled in Pennsylvania. 
•Judge and Mrs. Howe became the parents of 
three children ; Ruth died at the age of eight- 





^T^yU^ 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



een .years; Lucy, who is a graduate of Ab- 
bott Academy, at Andover, ]\Iassaeliusetts, 
and also of the Indiana State University and 
Cornell University, at Ithaca, New York, is 
now the wife of Archibald ]\r. Hall, of Frank- 
lin, Indiana ; and Miss Susan remains with 
her parents at the attractive family residence. 
No. 1007 North New Jersey street. 

Alexaxder C. Ayres. To have been for 
nearly two score of years a representative mem- 
ber of the bar of Indiana and the City of In- 
dianapolis, in itself bears evidence of marked 
ability and power of leadership. This is true 
of Alexander C. Ayres, who as a legist and jur- 
ist has dignified his profession by his charac- 
ter and services and who is now one of the 
recognized leaders of the bar of the capital 
city, where he is senior member of the law 
firm of Ayres, Jones & Hollett. He has used 
his intellect to the best purpose, has directed 
his energies along legitimate channels, and his 
career has been based upon the wise assumption 
that nothing save industry, perseverance and 
fidelity to duty will lead to success in an ex- 
acting profession which offers no opportunities 
save to valiant souls; to such its attractions 
are unrivaled and its rewards unstinted. 

Mr. Ayres finds much of satisfaction in re- 
verting to Indiana as the place of his nativity 
and he is a scion of one of the honored pioneer 
families of this commonwealth. He was born 
at Mount Carmel, Franklin County, on the 
9th of November, 1846, and is a son of Levi 
and Jane C. (Cregmile) Ayres, whose marriage 
was solemnized in Franklin County, this state, 
in 1840. Levi Ayre^ was born in Cumberland 
County, New Jersev, on the 3d of September, 
1808, and his death occurred in Marion 
County, Indiana, in 1888. He was a son of 
John and Margaret (Powner) Ayres, the for- 
mer of whom was bom in Cumberland County, 
New Jersey, in 1777, a son of John and Sus- 
anna (.Jarman) Ayres. John Avres, Sr., was 
likewise born in New Jersey, of Welsh lineage, 
and in that historic old commonwealth the 
family was founded in the early colonial enoch 
nf our national history. He entered the Con- 
tinental service in the War of the Revolution, 
and was captured bv the enemy, after which he 
was retained as a prisoner of war, in New 
York harbor, until the close of the great strug- 
gle for independence. The British refused to 
permit his exchanse bv reason of the fact that 
he was a skilled blacksmith and as such was of 
special value in their service. Levi Avres was 
reared and educated in New Jersev. whence he 
came to Indiana in the vear 1832. He located 
in Franklin County, and that be was a man of 
no inconsiderable scholarship, according to the 
standards of the period, is evident when we re- 
Vol. II— 8 



vert to the fact that soon after his arrival in 
Franklin County he secured an engagement to 
teach school. In 1833 he removed to Ticks- 
burg, Mississippi, where he followed the trade 
of painter until 1836, when he returned to 
Franklin County, Indiana, where he secured a 
tract of land and turned his attention to agri- 
cultural pursuits, having reclaimed much of his 
land from the virgin forest. He remained on 
this homestead until 1858, when he came to 
Marion County and purchased a fann in Cen- 
ter township, where he passed the residue of his 
life. He was one of the honored and influential 
citizens of his township, was a stanch advocate 
of the principles and policies of the Democratic 
party and was called upon to serve in various 
public offices, including County Commissioner 
and that of representative of Franklin County 
in the state legislature, in 1857. He was a man 
of strong individuality and broad mental ken, 
and his life was guided and governed by the 
highest principles of integrity and honor. Sin- 
cerity, tolerance and kindliness marked his in- 
tercourse with his fellow men, and such was 
the man and such his works that his name 
merits an enduring place on the roster of the 
sterling pioneers of the Hoosier state. Both 
he and his wife were members of the Presby- 
terian Church. ^Irs. Ayres, at the time of her 
marriage was a resident of Franklin County, 
Indiana, where her parents, Alexander and 
Rachel Cregmile, were early settlers. The Creg- 
mile family, whose cognomen was originally 
spelled Craigmile, is of Scotch-Irish origin and 
was founded in America prior to the Revolu- 
tion. Levi and Jane C. (Cregmile) Ayres be- 
came the parents of seven children, of whom 
two died in infancy; John T. and R. Jennie 
are now deceased; Alexander C. is the imme- 
diate subject of this review; Franklin is de- 
ceased and Levi P. maintains his home in 
Indianapolis. 

Alexander C. Ayres passed the first twelve 
vears of his life in Franklin County and in 
1858, as already noted, his parents removed 
to i\Iarion County, where he has nu^intained 
his home during' the long intervening years 
and where he has won a generous measure of 
distinction and success. After duly availing 
himself of the advantages of the common 
schools he entered the Northwestern Christian 
University, now known as Butler College, and 
located in Irvington, a suburb of Indianapolis, 
in which institution he completed tlie pre- 
scribed curriculum and was graduated as a 
member of the class of 1868, with the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Arts. He then taught 
school for one year, at Greenwood, Johnson 
Countv. after which he came to Indianapolis 
and entered the offices of the firm of Hendricks, 



756 



HISTORY OF GKEATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



Hord & Hendricks, under whose preceptorship 
he read law for the ensuing three years, with- 
in which period he also completed the regular 
course in the law department of his alma ma- 
ter, the Northwestern Christian Univeraity, in 
which he was graduated in 1873, with the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Laws. He was forthwith 
admitted to the bar of his native state, and 
shortly afterward he formed a professional 
partnership with Hon. Byron K. Elliott, with 
whom he continued to be associated in practice 
until 18.76, when Mr. Elliott was elected to 
the bench of the superior court of Marion 
County. Judge Ayres then formed a partner- 
ship alliance with Hon. Edgar A. Brown, who 
later became judge of the circuit court of 
Marion County. The firm of Ayr6s & Brown 
continued in practice until 1882, when Judge 
Ayres was elected to the bench of the nine- 
teenth judicial cireui't, composed of Marion 
and Hendricks Counties. After serving ir 
this position for a little more than three years 
Judge Ayres resigned and resumed the active 
work of his profession, . in connection with 
which he became associated with his former 
partner, Judge Brown, and Lawson M. Har- 
vey, under the title of Ayres, Brown & Har- 
vey. In 1890 Mr. Brown became judge of the 
Marion circuit court and the firm was then 
dissolved. In January, 1892, Judge Ayres 
and Aquilla 0' Jones entered into a profes- 
sional partnership, under the title of Ayres & 
Jones, and upon the admission of John E. 
Hollett to the firm, in 1897, the present firm 
designation of Ayres, Jones & Hollett was 
adopted. The firm now ranks among the 
strongest in the state and controls a large and 
lucrative business. 

Judge Ayres has gained distinctive recogni- 
tion and high reputation by reason of his 
broad and exact knowledge of the science of 
jurisprudence and his ability in applying this 
information effectively both as a trial lawyer 
and as a counselor, as well as on the bench, 
in connection with whose work his rulings were 
signally effective and equitable, meeting with 
but very few reversals by the higher tribunals. 
His firm has had to do with large interests 
and with important litigations in the state 
and federal courts and he personally has long 
held prestige as one of the admirably equipped 
members of his profession in his native state. 
In politics he has ever been arrayed as a sup- 
porter, of the cause of the Democratic party, 
of whose principles he is an able exponent, 
and he has been a leader in the councils of his 
party in Indiana and was a delegate to the 
convention which nominated Cleveland for 
president. Judsre Avres is a member of the 
Phi Delta Tbeta. 



In the year 1881 was solemnized the mar- 
riage of Judge Ayres to Miss Anna Fay, 
daughter of Amos F. Fay, who was at that time 
a resident of Indianapolis, whence he later re- 
moved to St. Louis, Missouri, where he still 
resides. To Judge and Mrs. Ayres have been 
bom five ' children, whose names, in order of 
birth, are as here noted: Elliott, Mabel, 
Franklin, Henry L. and Alexander C, Jr. 
All are living except the last named, who died 
in infancy. 

Theodoke Stein. The conditions under 
which industrial and commercial enterprises 
of magnitude are prosecuted in this new cen- 
tury of electrical advancement in all lines of 
human activity, demand men who are force- 
ful and of strong potentiality, courage and 
judgment. Numbered among such repre- 
sentatives in the personnel of the successful 
business men identified with the material and 
civic progress of "Greater Indianapolis" is 
Theodore Stein, who is president of the Ger- 
man Fire Insurance Company of Indiana, 
and a director of the Indiana Title Guaranty 
and Loan Company, two of the substantial 
and important institutions in the capital city. 
Theodore Stein was born in Indianapolis 
on November 7, 1858, as the oldest- of five 
sons of Ernest Christian Frederick Stein and 
Catherine Elizabeth Stein, the one a poor, 
but worthy scion of the highest German no- 
bility, the other the daughter of a well-to-do 
German Gutsbesitzer. 

Mr. Stein's father, Frederick Stein for 
short, immediately after settling in this city, 
took an active interest in the organization of 
the Republican party, and became that 
party's first elected candidate for city clerk 
in 1856. 

It is said of him as a matter of distinction, 
that when later he became a justice of the 
peace, he invariably tried to arrange the dif- 
ferences of the people brought before his 
court on an amicable basis, and thereby avoid- 
ed imposing heavy money penalties and inci- 
dentally curtailing his own income, so dif- 
ferent from his contemporaries and later 
"Squires". 

Theodore Stein acquired the rudiments of 
his schooling in the old "German English 
Independent School ' ' of this city, a school 
attended by many of the most prominent of 
our present day men of affairs. While Mr. 
Stein's years at school were limited, he was 
a student, and never idle, and by self-applica- 
tion acquired much knowledge which his 
more fortunate contemporaries obtained in 
school and college. 

That 'Mr. Stein is a man to do things is 
illustrated bv the fact that while he was fol- 



HISTOKY OF GKEATER INDIAJSIAPOLIS. 



757 



lowing his daily vocation of bookkeeper and 
manager of a large lumbering institution, he 
was secretary of four savings and loan asso- 
ciations and treasurer of another. 

He has created an abstract of title busi- 
ness second to none anywhere, and which 
finally became the nucleus for the establish- 
ment of the Indiana Title Guaranty and Loan 
Company, with which Mr. Stein's name will 
be indelibly connected, and an institution 
which merits the confidence of all good peo- 
ple. 

In 1896 he was a most influential factor 
in saving from destruction at the hands of 
ruthless schemers, the old German Mutual 
Insurance Company, brought into a flourish- 
ing state by his friends, Adolph Seidenstieker 
and Lorenz Schmidt, and on its reorganiza- 
tion in the same year into a stock company 
under the name of the "German Fire Insur- 
ance Company of Indiana" he became its 
president, and to his indefatigable labors the 
great success of the company is largely due. 
Mr. Stein, in common with many latter 
day Americans, is much interested in ances- 
tral story, but unlike most of his country- 
men, he can trace back his line of descent a 
thousand years or more, all because of the 
historical prominence of the family, whose 
possessions, constituting one of the petty 
principalities of the German Empire, became 
mediatized in 1806, along with those of other 
princely houses. The ruins of the Stein an- 
cestral castle called "Burg Stein" erected in 
1050 A. D. may still be seen along with those 
of Nassau, the ancestral home of the present 
Queen of Holland,- on a mountain near the 
River Lahn not far from the City of Cob- 
lentz on the Rhine. 

Theodore Stein is one of that class of busi- 
ness men who lend a helping hand in all mat- 
ters pertaining to the advancement of the 
glory of his home city. Recognizing the need 
of a modern club in the city, he became one 
of the charter members of the Columbia Club. 
As a good Republican he helped in the early 
eflForts of the Marion Club. As a believer in 
Christian teachings he has aided church en- 
terprises. As a lover of music and all else 
that tends toward better family social life 
he became a member of the German House. 
As a patriot whose ancestors participated,.in 
the American Revolution, he became one of 
the charter members of the Indiana State So- 
ciety Sons of the American Revolution, and 
ultimately its president. He is also a Scot- 
tish Rite Mason and a Noble of the Mystic 
Shrine. 

Mr. Stein married an Indianapolis girl. 
Miss Bertha Kuhn, on March 15, 1882, and to 



them were born a daughter, Pauline, and a 
son, Theodore Stein, Jr. 

Hilton U. Brown. Indiana's capital city 
has reason for satisfaction in the presenta- 
tion of her claims for metropolitan facilities 
and due relative precedence in the matter of 
the newspaper press, as well as in the per- 
sonnel of its representatives. Among tliese is 
Hilton U. Brown, general manager of the In- 
dianapolis News, the leading evening daily of 
the Hoosier state and one that can well bear 
comparison with the great dailies of the en- 
tire Union. 

Mr. Brown finds no small measure of pleas- 
ure in reverting to Indianapolis as the place 
of his nativity. He was born in this city on 
the 20th of February, 1859, and is a son of 
Philip and Julia A. (Troster) Brown, the 
former of whom was born in Butler County, 
Ohio, and the latter in Germany, whence she 
came with her pafents to America when a 
child. Philip Brown was reared and educated 
in the old Buckeye state and was a scion of 
one of its honored pioneer families. His mar- 
riage was solemnized at Hamilton, that state, 
and in 1855 he came with his wife to Indian- 
apolis, which was then scarcelj' more than a 
thrifty village, but claiming priority by rea- 
son of being the capital of the state. He was 
one of the pione^ lumbermen of the city, 
having established a lumber yard on grounds 
not now remote from the center of the busi- 
ness district, at the comer of Massachusetts 
and Bellefontaine avenues and in juxtaposi- 
tion with the tracks of the old "Peru" (I. P. 
& C, now Lake Erie) Railroad, from which 
a private switch was extended into his yards 
and became known as Brown's switch. It is 
of historic interest that this switch led to the 
establishment of the railroad station on Mas- 
sachusetts avenue. Mr. Brown was one of 
the influential business men and honored citi- 
zens of the Indiana capital until his death, 
in 1864, at the age of sixty-four years. He 
was a man of scholarly instincts and attain- 
ments and a friend of the educatiftnal move- 
ments of his time. His name merits an en- 
during place on the roll of the pioneers who 
laid the foundations upon which has been 
reared an industrial and commercial city, a 
city that "vaunteth not itself", but one 
whose prestige has now 'reached remote re- 
gions by reason of the products sent forth 
from its manufactories and commercial 
houses. Philip Brown was enrolling clerk of 
the Home Guards during the time of the Civil 
War, having been beyond the age limit for 
active service as a soldier. He died about one 
year before the close of the great conflict. 
In politics he was originally a supporter of 



rss 



HISTOEY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



the cause of the Democratic party. Later he 
became a Whiij, but upon the organizatic^n ot 
the Republican party, the avowed champion 
of abolition of slavery, he transferred his 
allegiance to that party, remaining an advo- 
cate of its principles until the close of his 
life. His wife, who survived him until 1874. 
was forty-four years of age at the time of her 
death. Of their children only two attained 
to years of maturity— Demarchus C, who is 
now State Librarian of Indiana at Indian- 
apolis, and Hilton U., who is the immediate 
subject of this review. 

To the public schools of Indianapolis Hil- 
ton U. Brown is indebted for his early edu- 
cational discipline. After completing the 
grammar grades he was matriculated in But- 
ler College, located at Irvington, now o6e of 
the attractive suburban districts of this city, 
in which institution he was graduated as a 
member of the class of 1880, with the degree 
of Bachelor of Arts. He then for a year was 
a school teacher and was nominal head of 
what was known as "Oaktown Academy", a 
public school at Oaktown, Knox County, this 
state. He had in the meantime made appli- 
cation to John H. Holliday for a reporter's 
place on the Netvs. The assassination of Gar- 
field caused a demand for extra men on the 
paper and this gave the applicant a chance. 
His newspaper career has been marked by 
consecutive advancement and success. Thils, 
in 1881, he became a member of the staff as 
market reporter of the Indianapolis News, 
with whose affairs he has been identified dur- 
ing the intervening period of nearly thirty 
years and of which he is now general man-- 
ager. In 1890 he became city editor of the 
News, retaining its incumbency until 1898, 
when he was appointed receiver of the same 
during litigation growing out of a dissolution 
of the company's partnership. As such he 
sold the paper for the litigants for nearly a 
million dollars— a great price for those days. 
Following the receivership he was made gen- 
eral manager, of which position he has con- 
tinued incumbent. In the meantime the 
paper has reached metropolitan standards, 
both as a news vehicle and as an exponent of 
local interests. Representing the owners he 
has been intrusted with many important com- 
missions all of which he executed with dis- 
cretion and success. Among them was the 
purchase for the owners of the News of the 
Indianapolis Press and the Indianapolis Sen- 
tuicl. . He has served in almost every capacity 
on a newspaper and his intimate knowledge 
of all departments of newspaper work has 
eriven him standing as one of the representa- 
tive niombers of the jwuriialistic fraternitv in 



Indiana, and has led to his repeated election 
as director of the American Newspaper Pub- 
lishers' Association. Progressive and public- 
fpirited as a citizen, he has championed all 
legitimate causes and enterprises which have 
tended to conserve the general welfare of the 
community and make for the upbuilding of 
"Greater Indianapolis". 

In polities Mr. Brown is a Republican with 
somewhat insurgent leanings. He is a Mas- 
ter Mason and is affiliated with Irvington 
Lodge, No. 666, Free and Accepted ^Masons. 
He and his wife hold membership in the 
Christian Church. He has been a valued 
member of the board of trustees of his alma 
mater, Butler College, for a period of nearly 
twenty years, and has been president of its 
board of ti-ustees since 1903. He takes a 
deep interest in the affairs of this excellent 
institution with which he and his people have 
been identified almost from its beginning. 

In 1883 he was married to Miss Jennie 
Hannah, daughter of Captain Archibald A. 
Hannah, who was a representative citizen of 
Paris, Illinois, and the names of the ten chil- 
dren of this union are here entered, in order 
of birth: Mark H., Philip (deceased), Louise 
(now Mrs. John W. Atherton), Marj% Hilton, 
Jr., Jean, Archibald, Paul, Jessie and Julia. 

Leonard M. Quill. The efficient and popu- 
lar county clerk of Marion County has l>ecn 
a resident of Indianapolis since his boyhood 
days and here he has risen to his present re- 
sponsible position through the well directed 
efforts and personal integrity which gave him 
so strong a hold iipon popular confidence and 
esteem as to bring about his election to the 
office of which he is incumbent. 

Mr. Quill Avas bom in West Manchester. 
Preble County, Ohio, on the 15th of December, 
1808, and is a son of Thomas F. and .\daline 
(Banta) Quill, whose marriage was solemnized 
in Preble County. Thomas F. Quill is a native 
of County Kerry, Ireland, where he was born 
in the year 184fi, and in IS.'ifi, when he was 
a lad of ten years, his parents. Thoma.s and 
Fllen (Laughlin) Quill, immigrated to 
America, making the State of Ohio their des- 
tination and establishing their home in Preble 
County, where they passed the remainder of 
their lives. Thomas F. Quill was reared to 
maturity in that county, where he received a 
common-school education and where he fol- 
lowed the vocation of traveling salesman after 
his marriage to Miss Adaline Banta, who was 
l)orn in that county in 1848. Thcv are now 
residents of Indianapolis, where they have 
maintained their home since 1877. Upon com- 
ing to this city Thomas F. Quill engaged in 
the nurserv business and he is still activelv 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



rod 



identified with business affairs. He has been 
a zealous worker in the cause of the Republican 
party and served one term as assessor of Cen- 
ter Township, ■\Iarion County, the township 
in which the City of ' Indianapolis is located. 
He has ever commanded unqualified esteem 
in the community which has represented his 
home for more than thirty years and is a man 
whose career has been marked by iiiflexible in- 
tegrity of purpose. Both he and his wife are 
communicants of the Catholic Church. Of 
their children two are living and the subject 
of this review is the elder; John J. holds a 
clerical position in the offices of the national 
Inter-state Commerce Commission, in \Yash- 
ington, D. C. 

In the capital city of Indiana Leonard M. 
Quill was reared to maturity, and his early 
educational discipline was secured in the 
parochial and public schools. After complet- 
ing the curriculum of the latter he took an 
effective course in the Indianapolis Business 
College, and after leaving this institution he 
was employed for tA?o .years in the Buffalo shoe 
store, then a well known retail establishment 
of. Indianapolis. During the four years' re- 
gime of his father in the office of township as- 
sesspr of Center Township, Mr. Quill was em- 
'ployed in the assessor's office, and after leav- 
ing the same he assumed a clerical position in 
the offices of the Indianapolis Gas Company, 
with whose interests he was identified for a 
period of twelve years, within which he was 
promoted to a position of responsibility as an 
executive. He resigned his position with the 
gas company to assume that of chief deputy 
in the office of the county clerk, William E. 
Davis, and he served in this capacity until his 
election to the office of county clerk, as can- 
didate on the Republican ticket, in November, 
1906. He assumed the duties of the office on 
the 1st of January, 1907, and his term will 
expire Januan' 1, 1911. He has given a most 
capable and satisfactory administration and 
has handled the multitudinous details of the 
important office with marked discrimination, 
having in many ways improved the system and 
facilitated the work of the office. He has 
bec-n a zealoiis worker in the ranks of the Re- 
publican party, to which his allegiance is of 
the most unqualified order. He and his wife 
are communicants of the Catholic Church and 
he is identified with the Young Men's Insti- 
tute, the Knights of Columbus and the Benev- 
olent and Protective Order of Elks. 

On the 20th of July, 1892, Mr. Quill was 
united in marriage to Miss Nora C. Golden, 
who was born and reared in Indianapolis and 
who is a daughter of Dennis and Anna Golden, 



of this city. The chiMren of this union are 
Thomas E., William P. and Anna Patricia. 

Jackson Landers. A man of sterling 
character and one who left a definite impress 
upon the civic and business annals of his na- 
tive state was the late Jackson Landers, who 
died in the City of Chicago, on the 17th of 
February, 1908, after a career of signal in- 
tegrity and usefulness. His was a strong and 
noble individuality, marlced by sincerity and 
by an intrinsic honesty that manifested itself 
in his every thought, word and deed. His 
name and personality are held in grateful 
memory by all \vho knew him and had appre- 
ciation of his worthy life and generous at- 
tributes of character. 

At Landersdale, Morgan County, Indiana, 
a place named in honor of the sterling pioneer 
family of which he was a representative, 
Jackson Landers w;as born on the 14th of 
August, 1843, and, as already noted, his death 
occurred in the City of Chicago, whither he 
had gone for medical treatment. He was a 
son of William and Delila (Stone) Landers, 
both of w^hom continued their residence in 
Morgan County until their death. William 
Landers was born in the State of Virginia, 
in 1788, and was a son of Jonathan Landers, 
who was a native of England and of Scotch- 
Irish lineage. Jonathan Landers figures as 
the founder of the familv in America, whither 
he came when twenty-one years of age. He 
settled in the Old Dominion and was one of 
the valiant patriots sent forth by Virginia to 
battle for the caiise of independence in the 
War of the Revolution. His marriage was 
solemnized in Virginia, where he continued to 
reside until 1798, when he removed with his 
family to Kentucky, from w'hich state he came 
to Indiana, becoming one of the pioneer set- 
tlers of Morgan County, where he and his 
wife passed the residue of their lives. At the 
time of the laying out of Indianapolis, the 
commissioners stopped at the home of William 
Landers. He was a man of wealth and in- 
fluence in the county, where he became the 
owner of a large amount of land and re- 
claimed a productive farm. This farm of 
one thousand acres is still owned by members 
of his family. He was active in public af- 
fairs of a local order, was a man of superior 
intellectual force and ever held a secure place 
in the esteem of the community to whose de- 
velopment he contributed in liberal and gen- 
erous measure. His children were William, 
James, John and Lucy. William Landers was 
ten years of age at the time of the family 
removal from the Old Dominion state to 
Kentucky, where he was reared to maturity 
and where he received such educational ad- 



760 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



vantages as were afforded in tht common 
schools of the period. . In 1820 he came to In- 
diana, in company with his father and other 
members of the family, and he was thirty- 
two years of age at the time. He became one 
of the prominent agriculturists of Morgan 
County, served in various local oflSces of pub- 
lic trust and well upheld the honors and pres- 
tige of the name which he bore. His life was 
guided and governed by the highest princi- 
ples and his influence was potent in connec- 
tion with the civic and material progress of 
the county of which he was a pioneer. He 
was twice married, having first wed Miss Eva 
Stone, a daughter of Nimrod Stone, who was 
a native of Virginia and a loyal soldier in the 
Continental line in the War of the Revolu- 
tion. After the death of his fijst wife he was 
united in marriage to her sister Delila, who 
survived him by a number of years. 

Jackson Landers, the immediate subject of 
this memoir, was reared to manhood on the 
homestead farm of his father, in Morgan 
County, and there he learned the lessons of 
thrift and industry which served him well in 
the later years of his prolific and successful 
life. He was fully appreciative of such edu- 
cational advantages as were accorded him in 
the common schools of his native county and 
the discipline thus received was rounded out 
and made sjTnmetrical by self -application and 
by the active and varied experiences of a 
most successful career as one of the world's 
noble army of workers. As a young man he 
removed from Morgan County to Marion 
County, in which the capital city is located, 
and he became the owner of a large and val- 
uable farm in Centre Township— a property 
upon which he made the best of improve- 
ments and in possession of which -he contin- 
ued for many years. He continued to be 
actively interested in the great basic industry 
of agriculture throughout his entire career, 
and at the time of his death was the owner 
of a large and finely improved farm in Mor- 
gan County, a part of the same being the 
place upon which his father located upon 
coming to Indiana in the early pioneer epoch. 
As a stanch and well fortified advocate of 
the principles and policies of the Democratic 
party, Mr. Landers early assumed measur- 
able leadership in the councils of his party in 
Marion County, and such was the character 
of the man and such his partisan loyalty that 
he became marked as a. most eligible candi- 
date for official preferment. In 1876 he was 
elected to the responsible office of treasurer 
of Marion County, in which position he 
served two years, refusing to become a can- 
didate for re-election' at the expiration of his 



original term. The respect and esteem in 
which he was held in the county was signifi- 
cantly shown in his election to the office of 
county treasurer, for he overcame a large and 
normal Republican majority. His adminis- 
tration of the fiscal affairs of the county am- 
ply justified the popular trust reposed in him 
and so definitely indicated by the suffrages of 
the voters of the county. At the time of his 
election he removed from his farm to the City 
of Indianapolis, wiiere he ever afterward 
maintained his home and where his popular- 
ity was of the most unequivocal order. Upon 
his retireinent from office Mr. Landers became 
manager of the Landers pork-packing plant 
and business, of which he had been one of the 
founders, and he retained this incumbency 
for several years. In 1886 he became one of 
the interested principals in the organization 
of the United States Encaustic Tile Works, 
of which corporation he was elected treasurer. 
He gave much of his time to the promotion 
of the interests of this concern, now one of 
the most extensive and important of its kind 
in the Union, and he retained the executive 
office mentioned until 1906, when, upon the 
death of John J, Cooper, he succeeded to ^the 
presidency of the company, a position of 
which he continued in tenure until the time 
of his death. 

As a business man Mr. Landers was far- 
sighted, enterprising and progressive, and his 
administrative ability was of a higli order. 
He had naught of ostentation and gave to 
every man a fair and just estimate, having no 
respect for the mere fictitious phases of pomp 
and power. Plain, direct and forceful in his 
conversatioxj, he was sometimes considered 
brusque or abrupt, but there was naught of 
austerity in his nature and his heart was es- 
sentially attuned to sympathy, tolerance and 
generous impulses. As may well be under- 
stood, he was a man of positive character, and 
there was nothing vacillating in his attitude 
in either the business or social relations of 
life. In all relations he did right as it was 
given him to see the right, and he was ever 
ready to extend co-operation in the promotion 
of measures for the general welfare of the 
community and to lend aid to those afflicted 
or distressed "in mind, body or estate". He 
was a consistent member of the Third Chris- 
tian Church of Indianapolis and exemplified 
his faith in his daily life. In the Masoijic 
fraternity he was raised to the sublime de- 
gree of Master Mason, and until his death he 
maintained active affiliation with Lodge No. 
319, Free and Accepted Masons, of Indian- 
apolis. In his death Indianapolis lost one of 
its most honored citizens, and his life itself 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



761 



constitutes the best monument to his mem- 
ory. 

As a young man Mr. Landers was united in 
marriage to Miss Georgiana Knox, who like- 
wise was born in Morgan County, Indiana, 
where her parents were pioneer settlers, and 
she was summoned to the life eternal in 1876, 
having been a devout member of the Chris- 
tian Church. Of the children of this mar- 
riage the following brief record is made : 
John B., who became a successful stock raiser 
in Kansas, is now deceased ; Lillie is the wife 
of Winfield Miller, connected with Connecti- 
cut Mutual Insurance Company; William F., 
who is treasurer of the United States En- 
caustic Tile Works, of Indianapolis, is indi- 
vidually mentioned on other pages of this 
work; and Arthur died at the age of twenty- 
two years. In 1878 Mr. Landers was united 
in marriage to Mrs. Laura (Hayes) Laycock, 
who survives him. Their daughter, Eudora, 
now deceased, was the wife of William Har- 
bison, of Indianapolis 

William F. La.ntders. Numbered among 
the essentially representative business men of 
the younger generation in the capital city, 
William F. Landers is the only living son of 
the late Jackson and Georgiana (Knox) Lan- 
ders, and as on other pages of this work is 
entered a memorial tribute to his honored 
father it is not requisite that further review 
of the family history be incorporated in the 
present article. Suffice it to say that he is, 
in both the ^ agnatic and maternal lines, a 
scion of honored pioneer stock in Indiana. 

William F. Landers was bom in the village 
of Landersdale, Morgan County, Indiana, on 
the 25th of January, 1868, and the place of 
his nativity was named in honor of the fam- 
ily of which he is a representative. He was 
reared principally in the City of Indianapolis 
and was afforded the advantages of the ex- 
cellent public schools of the capital city, in- 
eluding the high school. At the age of 
twenty-one years Mr. Landers assumed a po- 
sition as salesman in the dry goods establish- 
ment of Murphy. Hibben & Company, of In- 
dianapolis, but he held this position only a 
short interval, as in 1889 he became superin- 
tendent of the United States Encaustic Tile 
AVorks, one of the extensive and important 
industrial concerns of Indianapolis and one 
in which his father was a heavy stockholder, 
having been president of the corporation at 
the time of his death. The subject of this 
review gave most efficient service in the execu- 
tive office of superintendent and upon the 
death of his father, in 1908, he became treas- 
urer of the company, of which position he 
continued incumbent and in which he is giv- 



ing an able administration as one of the prin- 
cipal executive officers of the company. He 
is one of the progressive and loyal business 
men of the city and has shown a lively inter- 
est in all that has tended to conserve the de- 
velopment of "Greater Indianapolis". Like 
his father, he is a stanch supporter of the 
cause of the Democratic party, but he has 
never had any ambition for the honors or 
emoluments of public office. He is identified 
with various social and civic organizations of 
representative character and enjoj's marked 
personal popularity in the city which has 
been his home from his childhood days. 

On the 3rd of August, 1898, Mr. Landers 
was united in marriage to Miss Camilla Fisk, 
of Toledo, Ohio, and they have one child, 
William Fisk Landers. 

CiiAKLES E. Dark. In the various rela- 
tions of life the late Charles E. Dark, of In- 
dianapolis, gave to, the world the best of an 
essentially strong, noble and loyal nature; 
his life was guided and governed by the high- 
est principles of integrity and honor; he was 
humanity's friend and his nature was attun- 
ed to tolerance and sympathy. In connection 
with the practical affairs of life he accom- 
plished much and he left a record of value 
as one of the world's workers. He was long 
and prominently identified with various lines 
of the insurance business, in connection with 
which he gained a wide reputation, and 
though he encountered reverses, through no 
negligence or fault of his own, his name ever 
stood synonymous of absolute probity and 
honesty. 

Charles E. Dark was born in the city of 
Cincinnati, Ohio, on the 10th of April, 1849, 
and at Battle Creek, Mich., where the last 
six weeks of his life were spent, on the 13th 
of August, 1908, he died. He was a son of 
John and Nancy Ann (Brooks) Dark, the 
former of whom was born in Wiltshire, Eng- 
land, and the latter in Ohio, of Irish and 
English lineage; she is still living, main- 
taining her home in Indianapolis and being 
eighty-three years of age at the time of this 
writing. John Dark was reared and edu- 
cated in Cincinnati and became one of the 
leading contractors and builders of the city, 
where he constructed many of the oM build- 
ings that are still standing along the river 
front. In 1856 he went to Louisiana to su- 
perintend the construction of a building for 
which he had contract, and he was there as- 
sassinated for expressing too freely his views 
in regard to slavery, of whose abolishment he 
was an ardent and uncompromising advocate. 
He had previously been warned that such 
would be his fate if he again visited the com- 



7n2 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



iminity, and his action in going to the south 
again showed that he not- only had great 
physical courage, but also that of his convic- 
tions. 

When Charles E. Dark was eight years of 
age he came with his widowed mother to In- 
dianapolis, where he attended the common 
schools until he assumed, at an immature age, 
the practical responsibilities of life. When 
eleven years of age he initiated his business 
career by obtaining, with the exception of one 
other boy, the exclusive right to sell news- 
papers to the soldiers and prisoners in his- 
toric Camp Morton, which was here main- 
tained during the progress of the Civil War. 
He persistently pursued this line of work 
about one year, at the expiration of which 
he was given a position in the accojunting de- 
partment of the Indianapolis Journal. Soon, 
however, he was tendered a clerkship in the 
banking house of Fletcher & Sharpe, and af- 
ter a few years' experience as a bookkeeper 
for this institution he was given, at the age 
of sixteen years, the position of teller. From! 
this time until 1883, he was employed by vari- 
ous banking houses in the capital city and 
after the failure of the Indiana Banking 
Company, of which he was assistant cashier, 
he engaged in the fire-insurance business. For 
a number of years prior to the financial crisis 
of 1893 he had conducted the largest fire- 
insurance agency in the state. 

While thus engaged in the insurance busi- 
ness, Mr. Dark promoted the organization of 
the Indiana League of Fire Underwriters, of 
which he was the first president. This asso- 
ciation has done more to harmonize fire-in- 
surance interests in the state than has been 
accomplished through all other steps ever 
taken in the interests of that line of business, 
because it has brought together into one as- 
sociation what were non-union or non-board 
companies, thus, almost immediately, putting 
an end to unscrupulous competition, which 
was forcing premium rates to an inadequate 
figure. 

In 1895 Mr. Dark found the small fortune 
which he h.td succeeded in accumulating had 
been entirely swept away, through exigencies 
over which he had no control, and in addi- 
tion to this he was left with a heavy indebt- 
edness, .iwclced from a legitimately compara- 
tive standpoint. Instead of availing himself 
of bankruptcy, Mr. Dark showed his intrinsic 
integrity and honor by signifying his un- 
alterable determination to pay one hundred 
cents on every dollar of his indebtedness, 
and through his earnest efforts he practically 
accomplishwl this laudable result when an 
untimelv death terminat<:>d his labors. From 



1895 until 1899 he was engaged in the mort- 
gage-loan business, in the meanwhile devot- 
iug considerable attention to life insuranci 
and making a careful and discriminatinii 
study of actuarial science, in which he had 
become much interested several years previ- 
ously. 

In 1898, realizing the fact that there was 
not in existence in the state of Indiana a 
regular legal-reserve life-insurance company, 
he took up the work of procuring the passage 
by the state legislature of a life-insurance 
law which would conserve the interests of 
stockholders and policyholders in any com- 
pany which might be incorporated under its 
provisions. Associated with him in this work 
was Wilbur S. AVj'nn, founder and now vice- 
president and secretary of the State Life In- 
surance Company, of Indianapolis. After a 
very hard and bitter contest, engendered by 
the antagonism of a lobby representing in- 
terests of eastern companies, the desired law 
was passed, and it is known as the compul- 
sory legal-re-serve deposit law. This law was 
a district innovation, in that it was the first 
enacted by any state of the Union with the 
requirement of a deposit of securities cov- 
ering liabilities to policyholders, prescribing 
a definite basis of valuation, and also a defin- 
ite standard of investment for the funds of 
life-insurance companies. This law has been 
repeatedly adopted, in part, by other states 
of the Union. In April, 1899, immediately 
after the passage of the above mentioned law, 
Mr. Dark eifeeted the organization of the 
American Central Life Insurance Company, 
of Indianapolis, of which he was vice-presi- 
dent and general manager from its inception 
until the time of his death. 

In 1906, recognizing the lack of harmony 
among the younger life-insurance companies 
of the United States, and keenly realizing the 
necessity for their coinbining for the protec- 
tion of their o'wn legitimate interests. Mr. 
Dark promoted the organization of the Amer- 
ican Ijife Convention, an organization com- 
po.sed of about fifty of the leading western 
and southern life-insurance companies. He 
was the first president of this association, 
which has accomplished more than any other 
agency to bring about harmony and uniform- 
ity of legislation in connection with the life- 
insurance business. 

At the time of his death Mr. Dark was rec- 
ognized as the foremost life-insurance under- 
writer in the state of Indiana. Throughout 
his mature life he crave an unqualified alle- 
giance to the Republican party and, although 
entirely without political aspirations, he was 
known ns a hard worker in the rank-s of his 



HISTOEY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



:gl 



party whenever he was called upon for 
service in its behalf. He was a consistent 
and appreciative member of the time-honored 
IMasonic fraternity, in which he was affiliated 
with Mystic Tie Lodge, Free and Accepted 
Masons. As a very small boy, of his own voli- 
tion, he associated himself with the Presby- 
terian Church, and thereafter he took an un- 
usually active part in the various depart- 
ments of church work, in connection with 
which he was prominently concerned in the 
erection of the edifices of three of the lead- 
ing Presbyterian churches of Indianapolis— 
the Second, the Memorial and the Tabernacle 
Presbyterian churches, of which last men- 
tioned he was a member at the time when he 
was summoned to the life eternal. Among 
his friends and business associates he was 
known as a fervent and consistent Christian— 
one who applied the teachings of the faith 
to his business and social life. He was known 
for his gracious and genial personality, his 
lively human sympathy, his untiring energy, 
and, considering his resources, his extreme 
generosity in connection with churches and 
charitable organizations. He kept the needle 
of life true to the pole-star of hope and guid- 
ed his course with a full sense of his respon- 
sibilities and with the strength of conscious 
rectitude. His name merits a place on the 
roll of the worthy and representative citizens 
of the beautiful city in which practically his 
entire life was passed and to which his loy- 
alty was ever inviolable. 

On the 27th of February, 1872, was sol- 
emnized the marriage of Mr. Dark, at Can- 
ton, Ohio, to Miss Margaret Rebecca Hur- 
ford, who was born and reared in the old 
Buckeye state and who is a daughter of 
Alexander and Hannah (Humbert) Hurford. 
She survives her honored husband, as do also 
their two sons— Wilbur W., who was born 
March 14, 1873, and Edward H., who was 
born on the 9th of Augiist. 1875. 

Wilbur W. Dark gained his early educa- 
tional discipline in the public schools of his 
native city, and was graduated in the Short- 
ridge high school, then known as Indianap- 
olis high school, in February, 1891, after 
which he was for two years, 1892-3, a student 
in Cornell University, at Ithaca, New York. 
From 1893 until 1897 he was engaged as 
special agent and adjuster for fire-insurance 
companies, and from the latter year until 
1904, he gave his attention to the mortgage- 
loan, real-estate, and life and fire insurance 
bu.siness. In 1904 he became assistant sec- 
retary of the Amei'ican Central Life Insur- 
ance Company, of which he was elected sec- 
retary in 1905, retaining this office until 1908, 



when, after the death of his honored father, 
he succeeded the latter as vice-president of 
the company, of which position he is now in- 
cumbent. His brother, Edward H. Dark, is 
assistant seci'etary of the same company, and 
both are numbered among the representative 
business men of the younger generation in 
their native city. 

Frederick Faiinley. In Indiana's capital 
city it is a well recognized fact that the busi- 
ness career of Frederick Fahnley, president 
of. the Fahnley & McCrea Millinery Com- 
pany, has been characterized by courage, con- 
fidence, progressiveness and impregnable in- 
tegrity of purpose. He has been identified 
with the wholesale millinery trade in Indian- 
apolis for nearly half a century, and none 
has a more secure status as a representative 
business man and citizen of the city to whose 
prestige as a commercial center he has con- 
tributed in no small measure. He has ever 
shown implicit confidence in the development 
of the larger and greater Indianapolis, and 
this confidence has been that of action and 
definite accomplishment. To offer in a work 
of the province prescribed for the one at hand 
an adequate resume of the career of Mr. 
Fahnley would be impossible, but, with others 
who have aided in conserving the civic and 
industrial progress of the capital city, he may 
well find considei'ation in the noting here of 
the more salient points which have marked 
his life and labors 

Frederick Fahnley is a native of the king- 
dom of Wurtemburg, Germany, where he was 
born on the 1st of November, 1839, and his 
early educational discipline was secured in 
the schools of his native town. The intrinsic 
independence and ambition of the man were 
in evidence while he was still a boy, and he 
early became dependent upon his own re- 
sources. In 1854, when fifteen years of age, 
he made his advent in America, and his first 
permanent abiding place in the new world 
was at Medway, a little village in Clark 
County, Ohio. There he found employment 
in a general merchandise store, in which he 
remained engaged for two years, at the ex- 
piration of which he removed to the City of 
Dayton, in the adjoining County of Montgom- 
ery, where he passed the three ensuing j'ears 
as an attache of a wholesale millinery and 
dry goods house and where he gained his ini- 
tial experience in connection with the line of 
enterprise in which he was destined ultimately 
to gain so distinctive individual success and 
precedence. In 1860 he returned to the vil- 
lage of Medway, where he initiated his inde- 
pendent business career by opening a general 
country store, the diversity of whose required 



764 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



stock can be appreciated only by such as have 
been patrons of "emporiums" of that type. 
The enterprise proved successful, but Mr. 
Pahnley had not only the ambition but the 
capacity for att'airs of greater scope and im- 
portance, and he soon formulated definite 
plans for entering a wider field of endeavor. 
Thus, in 1865, he disposed of his business in 
Medway and came to Indianapolis, where, 
within the same year, he effected the organiza- 
tion of the wholesale millinery firm of Stiles, 
Fahnley & McCrea, in which his colleagnes 
were Daniel Stiles and Rollin McCrea. At 
that period Indianapolis was most inconspicu- 
ous as a distributing center, and it has been 
the privilege of Mr. Fahnley to witness and 
aid in the development of the wholesale inter- 
ests of the capital city until it is now recog- 
nized as one of the most important commer- 
cial centers in the middle west. The first 
store of the new firm of Stiles, Fahnley & 
McCrea was located on South Jleridian streel. 
directly opposite from the present fine busi- 
ness headquarters of the present company. 
After a period of four years, marked by con- 
servative and substantial progress, Mr. Stiles 
retired from the firm and his interest was 
acquired by his two associates, who continued 
the enterprise under the title of Fahnley & 
McCrea. 

Early in the year 1875, to meet the de- 
mands of a constantly expanding business, 
the firm purchased the ground on which they 
proceeded to erect what was at that time 
recognized as the finest building in the whole- 
sale district. This building occupied the site 
of the present headquarters, 240-242 South 
Meridian street, and 8 to 14, inclusive, on 
Louisiana street. In 1898 Messrs. Fahnley 
and McCrea reorganized their business, by 
the incorporation of a stock company, to 
which were admitted several of their old and 
valued employes, and the title of the concern 
was then changed to its present form— the 
Fahnley & McCrea Millinery Company. In 
February, 1905, the company suffered the loss 
of its building; and immense stocks in the 
mo.st disastrous fire that ever visited the 
wholesale district— a fire which completely 
wiped out also the large buildings of the Kie- 
fer Drug Company and the Griffith Brothers, 
as well as the Sherman House and several 
smaller buildings. Within the same year the 
Fahnley & McCrea Millinery Company erect- 
ed its present substantial and thoroughly 
modern building, which is a five-story brick 
structure and which affords an aggregate 
floor space of fully 63,000 square feet. The 
business has continued to grow steadily since 
the formation of the stock company and it 



has long represented one of the most im- 
portant enterprises of its kind in Indianap- 
olis. Its trade extends throughout the ever- 
widening territory made tributary lo this 
city, and the reputation of the company, as 
of the firm of which it is the lineal successor, 
has ever been of the highest. From a re- 
cently published sketch appearing in the In- 
dianapolis Trade Journal are taken the fol- 
lowing appreciative statements concerning 
Mr. Fahnley: 

"Frederick Fahnley has been a strong fac- 
tor in the upbuilding of the jobbing district 
of this city, a prominent figure for more than 
forty years in financial and commercial cir- 
cles of Indianapolis, which has well been 
designated as 'no mean city'. Though he has 
attained to the psalmist's span of three score 
years and ten, his mental and physical vigor 
is that of a man twenty years younger. Be- 
sides giving daily attention to the executive 
duties of his position as president of the mil- 
linery company, Mr. Fahnley is an active 
member of the directorate of the Merchants' 
National Bank and that of the Indiana Trust 
Company, in both of which leading financial 
concerns he holds the office of vice-president. 
He is a member of the Board of Trade and 
the Commercial Club, and was one of the or- 
ganizers of the Columbia Club, of which he 
is a valued and appreciative member. He is 
also an active member of the German House 
and of the Indianapolis Maennerchor So- 
ciety. He has always refused to accept politi- 
cal office of anj' kind, though as a Republican 
he was often tendered a nomination when 
such nomination meant election. He con- 
fesses, however, to having held one political 
office— that of postmaster of Medway, Ohio, 
under President Lincoln, but as this was 
when he was a 'boy' 22 years of age, he says, 
'that doesn't count'. 

' ' Frederick Fahnley is counted by his busi- 
ness associates and personal friends as a man 
of sterling integrity and upright business 
and social life. He is a man of notably un- 
assuming manners, but cordial, courteous and 
companionable to a marked degree". 

]\Ir. Fahnley married Miss Lena Soehner, 
a native of Baden, Germany. She came to 
America with her parents when seven years 
old and they lived in Dayton, Ohio, where 
Mrs. Fahnley was reared and educated. She 
died October 7, 1899, aged fifty-eight years, 
survived by two daughters. Bertha, who mar- 
ried Gavin Payne of Indianapolis, and Ada, 
the wife of William J. Shafer, also of In- 
dianapolis. Mrs. Fahnley was a woman who 
was greatly revered and was an active worlc 
er in many charitable organizations. 




i/lTjA^ilMs^ 



HISTOKY OF GKEATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



76.-: 



H. Ai.DEN Adams, M. D. For more than a 
decade Dr. H. Alden Adams has been en- 
gaged in the general practice of his profes- 
sion in Indianapolis, and he is known as one 
of the able physicians and surgeons of the 
capital city and as one whose devotion to his 
exacting and humane vocation is of the most 
insistent order. He enjoys marked personal 
and professional esteem and is entitled to con- 
sideration in this publication as one of thi* 
representative medical practitioners of 
"Greater Indianapolis". 

Dr. Adams was born in the City of LaSalle, 
Illinois, on the 15th of December, 1870, and 
Is a son of Kneeland T. and Elizabeth 
(Brown) Adams, the former of whom was 
born at Peru, Ohio, and the latter in Zanes- 
ville, that state. The father of the doctor 
was a son of Alden Adams, who was a mem- 
ber of one of the pioneer families of Ohio 
and who later became one of the early set- 
tlers of Wisconsin, where he conducted an 
old-time tavern or hotel and where he also 
operated a stage line for a number of years. 
He passed the closing years of his life at 
Warsaw, Illinois. Mrs. Elizabeth (Brown) 
Adams, who died April 17, 1909, was a 
daughter of Dr. James fc. Brown, who was 
born in Vermont and who settled in LaSalle, 
Illinois, in 1851. He became one of the lead- 
ing physicians of that section of Illinois, 
where he was engaged in the active practice 
of his profession for many years, and he died 
in 1883, at a venerable age. Kneeland T. 
Adams was engaged in the banking and the 
dry goods business in LaSalle, Illinois, where 
he also became a manufacturer of glass. He 
disposed of his interests in that place in 1872, 
when the subject of this review was two years 
of age, and removed with his family to In- 
dianapolis, where he engaged in the dry goods 
business, as a member of the firm of Adams 
& Hatch. Later he was in the commission 
trade and at the time of his death, in 1885, 
he was here engaged in the retail grocery 
business. He was a man of sterling integrity 
and much intellectual resource, and he ever 
commanded the high regard of those with 
whom he came in contact in the various rela- 
tions of life. He was a Republican in poli- 
i.ics and was a consistent member of the Pres- 
byterian Church, of which his widow was 
also a member. Of their four children three 
are living. 

Dr. Adams was reared to maturity in In- 
dianapolis, where he completed the curricu- 
lum of the public schools, including the high 
school. He thereafter assisted in the grocery 
store of his father until the death of the lat- 
ter, when the stock and business were sold. 



Thereafter the doctor served an apprentice- 
ship at the trade of "machinist, to which he 
gave his attention for a period of about three 
years. He then completed a three years' 
course in the department of mechanical engi- 
neering in Purdue l^niversity, at LaFayette, 
Indiana, leaving this institution in 1892, in 
which year he was graduated. In 1892 hi^ 
was matriculated in the Chicago Homoeo- 
pathic Medical College, in which he completed 
the prescribed technical and clinical course 
and in which he was graduated as a member 
of the class of 1895, with the degree of Doc- 
tor of Medicine. He forthwith initiated the 
work of his profession in Indianapolis, where 
be has proved an able and successful exemplar 
of the beneficent Homoeopathic system of 
medicine, besides being a thoroughly skilled 
surgeon. In 1896 Dr. Adams completed y 
post-graduate course in the New York Ophr 
thalmie and Auric Institute, and since that 
time he has been a specialist in the treatment 
of the diseases of the eye, ear, nose and throat, 
realizing that much is to- be gained by con- 
centration in professional work and by di- 
recting attention to specific lines of practice. 
He is a valued member of the Indiana In- 
stitute of Homoeopathy and the American In- 
stitute of Homceop&thy and he continues to 
be a close student of the best standard and 
periodical literature of his profession, par- 
ticularly that touching the special field of 
practice to which he gives the greater meas- 
ure of his time and attention. In politics the 
doctor is aligned as a stanch supporter of the 
cause for which the Republican party stands 
sponsor, and both he and his wife hold mem- 
bership in the First Presbyterian Church of 
Indianapolis. 

On the 17th of April, 1901, Dr. Adams was 
united in marriage to Miss Margaret DeMotte, 
of Franklin, Indiana. 

Jamks L. Thompson, M. D., has made his 
high professional reputation by thirty-eight 
years of special practice in the city of Indian- 
apolis, preceded by about three years spent in 
the surgical service of the government dur- 
ing the Civil War and nine years in private 
practice at various points in Indiana. With 
the exception of his service in the army he is 
virtually a physician and surgeon whose 
standing has been attained within the bor- 
ders of this state. A native of London, Eng- 
land, born October 5, 1832, he is a son of 
John and Ann (Rossiter) Thompson. 

The doctor was reared in his native city, 
where he attended various private schools, 
and when eighteen years of age, in 1850, emi- 
grated to the United States. The first two 
years of his residence in this country were 



766 



HISTORY OF GKEATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



spent in "taking his bearings", and in 1852 
lie directed his course to the state of Indiana, 
which has since been his home. He com- 
menced the study of medicine while a resi- 
dent of Rush County and in 1860 gradu- 
ated from the Rush Medical College of Chi- 
cago, being engaged in practice at ^Moscow at 
the outbreak of the Civil War. In Jlay, 1863, 
he was in the service of the Union army as 
acting assistant surgeon, U. S. A., stationed 
at Memphis, Tennessee, in the Adams U. S. 
Hospital, in the summer and later was at 
Fort Pickering. He passed the examination 
for a surgeon's certificate and was appointed 
to that position, being assigned to the Fouth 
United States Heavy Artillery of colored 
troops. He was subsequently promoted to tlie 
medical directorship of the western district 
of Kentucky, with headquarters at Paducah, 
resigning that position in 1865 because of 
physical disability. 

After his professional military service. Dr. 
Thompson resumed private practice in Rush 
County and at Harrison, Ohio, but soon went 
to Cincinnati, where he took a special course 
in diseases of the eye and ear under Dr. Will- 
iams and served for a time as his assistant. 
In 1871 he located in Indianapolis, the first 
thirty years of his career being devoted to 
the medical and surgical treatment of eye and 
ear affections, and the last eight years to 
those of the eye alone. In these specialties 
he has always been an acknowledged leader. 
From 1874 he was professor in the Medical 
College of Indiana, until 1889 occupying the 
chair of diseases of the eye and ear. Dr. 
Thompson is an active member of the Mar- 
ion County and Indiana State Medical so- 
cieties and the American ]\Iedical Association 
and is a member of the Indianapolis Literary 
Club, with which he has long been identified. 
He is also a member of the Indiana Com- 
mandery of the Loyal Legion of the United 
States. Dr. Thompson went to INIilan, Italy, 
with the International Congress in 1880 as a 
member and also was a member of Interna- 
tional Ophthalmic Congress at Edinburg, 
Scotland, in 1894. In 1861 Dr. Thompson 
married Miss Martha J. Tevis, who died in 
1898, leaving a son and a daughter: Daniel 
A., M. D., who died in 1904, being his fa- 
ther's associate and a physician of great 
promise; and Emma Louis, who married Dr. 
J. H. Oliver, of Indianapolis. 

LiNNAES C. Boyd. A native son of the 
fine old Hoosier state who has here attained 
to pronounced success and prestige as a busi- 
ness man of distinctive initiative and execu- 
tive talent, is Linnaes C. Boyd, president of 
the Indianapolis Water Company, whose ef- 



fective service represents one of the more im- 
portant of the fine public utilities of the capi- 
tal city. ^Ir. Boyd is one of those alert and 
progressive spirits whose infiuence finds mani- 
fold ramifications, and it has been through his 
own energy and efforts that he has achieved 
distinctive success in connection with the 
practical affairs of life, while he has so or- 
dered his course as to merit and receive the 
unequivocal confidence and regard of his fel- 
low men. 

Mr. Boyd was born near the village of Mid- 
dleborough, Wayne County, Indiana, on the 
18th of January, 1864, and in both the pater- 
nal and maternal lines he is a scion of old 
and honored families of that county, known 
as the headquarters for the settlement of the 
sterling representatives of the Society of 
Friends in the early days of the history of 
the state. The first addition to the original 
plat of the City of Richmond, the judicial 
center and metropolis of the county, was laid 
out by Mr. Boyd's maternal great-grand- 
father, Jeremiah Cox, who was one of the 
honored and influential pioneers of the county 
and a devout member of the religious 
organization commonly designated as Quak- 
ers but properly known as the Society of 
Friends. In his home was held the first 
church meeting of the Friends in Indiana. 
He came to this state from North Carolina at 
an early date in the history of the former 
commonwealth, and was prominent among the 
worthy Friends who brought Wayne County 
forward to a position much in advance of 
other sections of the pioneer commonwealth 
in points of educational advantages and civic 
progress. 

Mr. Boyd is in the fourth generation of 
direct descent from Jonathan Boj'd, who was 
born and reared in Scotland and who figures 
as the founder of the family in America. 
This sturdy, virile and honest ancestor settled 
in North Carolina and from that state his son 
Adam, grandfather of the subject of this 
sketch, came to Indiana and numbered him- 
self among the pioneers of Wayne County, 
where he had the distinction of l^eing the first 
person to be elected justice of the peace. He 
was a man of prominence and infiuence in 
the community and the major portion of his 
active career was one of close identification 
with agricultural pursuits. He also was a 
member of the Society of Friends. 

John C. Boyd, father of the president of 
the Indianapolis Water Company, was born 
and reared in AVayne County, Indiana, and 
there became a prominent and successful 
farmer and business man and an influential 
and honored citizen. He married ^liss Celia 



HISTOEY OF GREATEE INDIANAPOLIS. 



767 



C. Cox, daughter of Robert Cox, who was a 
son of the previously mentioned pioneer, Jere- 
miah Cox. John C. and Celia C. (Cox) Boyd 
became the parents of four children, of whom 
Linnaes C. of this review is the eldest. Tlvi 
parents are now both deceased and both were 
birthright members of the Society of Friends. 
The mother died in 1899 and was interred at 
Earlham Cemetery, Richmond, and the father 
died in 1902, and is also interred in Earlham 
Cemetery. 

Linnaes C. Boyd secured his early educa- 
tional discipline in the public schools of his 
native village, and thereafter he continued 
his studies for two years in Earlham College, 
in the City of Richmond. That he made good 
use of his scholastic advantages is evident 
when recognition is taken of the fact that 
when but sixteen years of age he secured a 
teacher's license in his home county, where 
he turned his attention to the pedagogic pro- 
fession, as. a teacher in the village schools of 
his home town of Millersborough. He was 
engaged in teaching for four years, within 
which period he also was a student for two 
terms in the Indiana State Normal School at 
Terre Haute, which institution he entered 
when seventeen years of age. Mr. Boyd early 
formulated plans for his future career and 
after having decided to prepare himself for 
the legal profession he began reading law 
during his leisure hours during the last two 
years of his work as a teacher. He continued 
his technical study under the preceptorship 
of the law firm of Stafford & Boyd, of Nobles- 
ville, this state, where he was admitted to the 
bar in the year 1885. He there became a 
member of the firm under whose direction he 
had prosecuted his studies, and he soon 
proved his mettle as a forceful, versatile and 
successful trial lawyer and well fortified coun- 
selor. After leaving the law firm he 
went with the Pennsylvania Railroad Com- 
pany, where he was tendered the position of 
claim adjuster. This office he filled with 
marked ability and discrimination, safeguard- 
ing the interests of the company in many 
eases that came before its legal department 
for adjustment, and he retained the office for 
a period of years, resigning the same in 
1892. During his incumbency of this posi- 
tion his work took him throughout the ter- 
ritory traversed by the lines of the great 
Pennsylvania system west of the City of 
Pittsburg, and in the meanwhile his busine.ss 
acumen and judgment led him to make in- 
vestments in connection with oil and natural 
gas operations at varioiis points in the region 
thus covered by him. In fact, from the time 
he entered the service of the legal department 



of the Pennsylvania -Company, Mr. Boyd has 
been identified, in one capacity or another, 
with common-carrier and public-service cor- 
porations. He became president of the Manu- 
facturers' Natural Gas Company of Indian- 
apolis, to which city he removed with his 
family from Richmond in 1905, and in 1904 
he was elected a member of the directorate 
of the Indianapolis Water Company, of which 
he became vice-president in the following 
year, and of which he has been president 
since May 1, 1909. Mr. Boyd has shown dis- 
tinctive initiative and constructive ability as 
a business man, and he now gives the major 
portion of his time and attention to his cap- 
italistic and executive afl'airs, though it is 
conceded by all who know him that his equip- 
ment for gaining still greater distinction in 
his profession was of the best. He has never 
sought or desired the honors or emoluments 
of political office, though he is a stanch sup- 
porter of the cause of the Republican party. 
He has risen to a high position as a financier 
and business man and his large and important 
capitalistic interests represent the concrete 
i-esults of his own mature judgment, acumen 
and well directed endeavors along normal and 
legitimate lines of enterprise. Mr. Boyd is 
held in high esteem in the business circles of 
the capital city and is identified with such 
representative civic organizations as the Mar- 
ion, Columbia, University and Commercial 
Clubs and the German House. 

On the 19th of June, 1890, was solemnized 
the marriage of Mr. Boyd to Miss Mary 
Thomas Spencer, who was born in Cincin- 
nati and reared in Wayne County, In- 
diana, being the daughter of William F. 
Spencer, a prominent manufacturer and in- 
fluential citizen of Richmond, that county. 
Mr. and Mrs. Boyd have three children- 
Helen, William Spencer and Philip Linnaes. 

Augustus Lynch Mason. To have been 
for nearly thirty years a representative mem- 
ber of the bar of Indianapolis, in itself bears 
evidence of unmistakable ability and power 
of leadership. This is true of Augustus 
Lynch Mason, who has dignified his profes- 
sion by his character and services and who 
is now one of the leading corporation lawyers 
of the State of Indiana. Of fine intelketual 
and professional attainments, he has used his 
powers to the best purpose, has directed his 
energies along legitimate channels, and his 
career has been based upon the assumption 
that nothing save industry, perseverance, in- 
tegrity and fidelity to duty will lead to suc- 
cess, which, indeed, is the prerogative of only 
valiant souls. The profession of law offers 
no inducements or opportunities except to 



IIISTOKV OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



such determined spirits. It is an arduous, 
exacting, discouraging vocation to one who 
is unwilling to subordinate other interests 
to its demands, but to the true and earnest 
devotee it offers a sphere of action whose at- 
tractions are unrivaled and whose rewards 
are unstinted. The name of Mr. Mason, is 
familiar in connection with the general prac- 
tice of his profession and especially in the 
department of commercial and corporation 
Jaw, and as a citizen he typified the utmost 
loyalty and public spixit. 

Augustus Lynch Mason is a native of In- 
diana and a scion of one of its honored pio- 
neer families. He was born at Bloomington, 
"Monroe County, this state, on the 10th of 
February, 1859, and is a son of Rev. William 
F. and Amanda (Lynch') Mason, the former 
of whom was born in Indiana and the latter 
in Ohio. The father was afforded excellent 
educational advantages in his youth and pre- 
pared himself for the ministry of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church, in which he was 
duly ordained when a young man. For a. 
number of years he was engaged in the work 
of the ministry, in Ohio and Indiana, and 
his entire life has been marked by conse- 
crated effort in the aiding and uplifting of 
his fellow men, though he has for many years 
been retired from the active work of the min- 
istry and has attained to marked success in 
connection with practical business activities. 
He finally became one of the interested prin- 
cipals in an extensive building and loan asso- 
ciation in the City of Denver, Colorado, to 
which city he removed from Indianapolis in 
1883. There both he and his wife still main- 
tain their home. Of Rev. William F. Mason 
the following words have been written, in 
connection with a statement regarding the 
early training of the son. Augustus L., sub- 
ject of this review: "Augustus L. Mason not 
only ranks high in his chosen profession but 
also among his social companions and in the 
literary circles of the capital city, where his 
classical learning and attainments have won 
treneral recognition. His father is a gentle- 
man of the old school, universally loved and 
respected and an excellent scholar, and thus 
during his youth ^Mr. ^lason had the advan- 
tage of judicious advice and coaching in ad- 
dition to superior educational opportunities 
outside of his home. His naturall.v broad and 
optimistic disposition has been developed 
along the most intelligent lines and he is uni- 
formly regarded as a high-minded gentleman 
and an altruist in the best sense of the word". 
Anthony ^Mason. father of Rev. William F. 
INIa.son, was a native of Kentucky and of 
stanch English lineage, the famil.v having 



been founded in America in the colonial 
epoch of our national history. He came to 
Indiana in an early day and became one of 
the honored pioneers and influential citizens 
of Sullivan County, where he reclaimed a 
farm from the wilderness and where he con- 
tinued to be identified with the great basic 
industry of agriculture until his death, which 
occurred about the year 1890, at which time 
he was eighty-four years of age. His wife 
also lived to a venerable age and their names 
have a secure place on the roll of the honored 
pioneers of the county mentioned. Thomas 
H. Lynch, the maternal grandfather of him 
whose name initiates this article, was born ill 
Ohio, where his parents settled in the early 
pioneer days and where he was reared and 
educated. He was of English and French 
descent. He continued to reside in Ohio un- 
til 1850, when he removed with him family to 
Kentucky and then came to Indiana, taking 
up his abode in Indianapolis, where for a 
number of years he was president of the In- 
diana Female College, having been a man. of 
marked ability and wide erudition. He was 
finally ordained a clergyman of the ]\Iethodist 
Episcopal Church, to whose service he devot- 
ed many years of his signally noble and use- 
ful life. He was summoned to eternal rest 
in 1892, at the venerable age of eighty-five 
years, and of his three children one is living. 
Augustus L. ilason was a child at the time 
of his parents' removal from Indiana to the 
City of Cincinnati, Ohio, where his father 
had engaged in business. In the Queen City 
he was reared to maturity and to its public 
schools he is indebted for his early scholastic 
discipline, which was continued in Northwest- 
ern University, now Butler College, Indian- 
apolis, where his parents took up their resi- 
dence in 1872, when he was seventeen years 
of age. Mr. jMason was matriculated in De- 
Pauw University, at Greencastle, Indiana, in 
which institution he was graduated as a mem- 
ber of the class of 1879 and from which he 
received the degree of Bachelor of Arts. He 
then returned to Indianapolis, where he be- 
gan reading law under effective preceptor- 
ship, and here he was admitted to the bar of 
his native state in 1880, since which time he 
has been engaged in the active practice of his 
profession in the capital city. For a number 
of years his practice was of a general order 
and he soon proved his mettle as an able and 
versatile trial lawyer and as a counselor well 
fortified in the minutiae of the science of 
jurisprudence, but for a long period he has 
confined his eft'orts more speciall.y to the do- 
main of corporation law. in which he holds 
an authoritative position and in connection 




ul//^^^ eTy^^^?— / 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



with which he has gained marked success and 
high prestige. For some time he was asso- 
ciated in practice with Joseph E. McDonald 
and John M. Butler, under the title of Mc- 
Donald, Butler & IMason. This alliance con- 
tinued for a period of eight years, and since 
that time Mr. Mason has conducted an indi- 
vidual professional business, having finely 
equipped offices at the present time in the 
American Central Life Insurance building. 
It may be stated that his former partners 
were men of distinction at the bar and that 
Mr. McDonald was United States Senator 
from Indiana and Mr. Butler was long dis- 
tinguished as one of the prominent railroad 
lawyers of the state and nation. Mr. Mason's 
professional business is of large and repre- 
sentative order, involving his retention as 
counsel for extensive corporate interests, and 
the incidental work engrosses the major por- 
tion of his time and attention, though he has 
large capitalistic interests and served from 
1893 to 1898 as president of the Indianapolis 
Street Railway Company. 

As a citizen Mr. jiason has even shown a 
broad-minded and progressive attitude, and 
his interest in his home city and state has not 
been one of mere sentimental order but one 
of definite fealty and action. Thus it may 
be noted that he was the author of the reform 
charter of Indianapolis in 1891, the same 
having been adopted by the legislature of 
that year and having been the direct result 
of a civic movement instituted by the Board 
of Trade and the Commercial Club for the 
reorganization of the municipal government 
of the capital city and the incidental correct- 
ing of many abuses that had crept into the 
municipal service, both through negligence 
and malfeasance. IMr. Mason was also the 
originator of the plan of the county and 
township reform laws adopted by the state 
legislature in the session of 1899, and this 
system also has inured greatly to the benefit 
of the people and the insurance of effective 
governmental policy in connection with such 
organic divisions of the state. He rendered 
able assistance in the formulating and prep- 
aration of the new laws, in connection with 
which he co-operated with the members of 
the assigned committee from the Indiana 
State Board of Commerce. 

In politics Mr. Mason gives an unequivocal 
allegiance to the Republican party, and while 
he has rendered effective service in the pro- 
motion of its cause he has manifested no de- 
sire for the honors or emoluments of public 
office, preferring to give his undivided atten- 
tion to the profession for which he has so 
ably fitted himself and in which he has risen 



to a position of prominence. He is a member 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church and he is 
identified with various fraternal and civic 
organizations of representative character in 
his home city, where he is held in high esteem 
in his profession and as a generous and pub- 
lic-spirited citizen. 

On the 2.5th of January, 1893, was solemn- 
ized the marriage of Mr. Mason to Miss 
Annie Porter, of Indianapolis, the only 
daughter of Hon. Albert G. and Minerva 
(Brown) Porter. Her father has held various 
offices of high puljlic trust in Indiana, in- 
cluding that of governor, and has left a defi- 
nite and beneficent impress upon the history 
of this cominonwealth. Mr. and Mrs. Mason 
have no children. They are prominent and 
enjoy unqualified popularity in the leading 
social circles of the capital city, taking much 
interest in the amenities and interests which 
i-epresent the higher ideals of life, and their 
pleasant home is a recognized center of re- 
fined and gracious liospitality. 

Wilbur S. Wynn. One of the most benefi- 
cent forces that has entered into and per- 
meated modern civilization is that of life in- 
surance. Its primary functions are in the 
protection of those-who are nearest and dear- 
est to the individual, and thus they touch 
the home— that (jon.servator of all that is best 
and most enduring in the scheme of human 
existence. Among the concerns offering in- 
demnity along these lines and maintaining a 
high sense of stewardship is the State Life 
Insurance Company, of Indianapolis, of 
which Mr. Wynn was not only one of the 
founders but the original promoter and of 
which he is now vice-president, secretary and 
actuary. It has been his privilege to accom- 
plish a notable work in his field of endeavor 
and especially in the matter of securing prop- 
er legislation for the control of life insurance 
business in Indiana. The operations of the 
company of which he has been secretary and 
actuary from the time of its initiation are 
regulated ujx)n a broad, safe and humani- 
tarian basis, enlisting in the management the 
highest personal integrity and executive abil- 
ity, while the financial affairs of the com- 
pany are manipulated for the distinct bene- 
fit of those who seek security through its 
interposition. The magnificent growth of the 
business of this corporation has been the 
diametrical result of effective service, honor- 
able methods and popular appreciation. To 
]Mr. Wynn's efforts have been due in large 
measure the development and upbuilding of 
the important enterprise, and it may be said 
without fear of legitimate contradiction that 
he is recognized as one of the representative 



770 



HISTOBY OF GEEATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



life insurance men of the I'liion, even as he 
is one of the honored aiul intiuential business 
men of Indiana's capital city. 

Wilbur Sylvester AYynn was born on a 
farm in ]\Ionroe County, Xew York, on the 
25th of January, 1850, and is a son of Joseph 
and Emeline (Harmon) Wynn, both of whom 
were likewise natives of ]\Ionroe County, 
where they passed their entire lives and 
where the father followed the vocation of 
farming until the time of his death. The 
Wynn and Harmon families, of English line- 
age, were both founded- in Xew England in 
the early colonial era of our national his- 
tory, and a great grandfather of the subject 
of this review in each the paternal and ma- 
ternal line was found enrolled as a valiant 
patriot soldier in the Continental line during 
the war of the Revolution. 

When Mr. Wynn was but five years of age 
both of his parents died, and he was then 
taken into the home of his maternal grand- 
father, Sylvester Harmon, of Monroe County, 
New York, with whom he remained until he 
had attained to the age of fourteen years. 
In the meanwhile he had been duly afforded 
the advant:iges of the public schools, and at 
the age noted he came to Indianapolis to live 
with his uncle, Wesley J. Wynn, who was at 
that time general agent in Indiana for the 
New York Life Insurance Company. In In- 
dianapolis young Wynn continued to attend 
school until he had completetl the curriculum 
of the high, school. At the age of seventeen 
years he secured employment in the book- 
publishing house of Bowen, Stewart & Com- 
pany, of Indianapolis, with which concern he 
was identified for a period of eight years, 
during a portion of which interval he was a 
traveling salesman for the house. He then 
began reading law under effective preceptor- 
ship, in Indianapolis, and when twenty-seven 
years of age he went to Hamburg, Iowa, 
■where he was admitted to the bar of the 
Hawkeye state and where he engaged in the 
successful practice of his profession. While 
a resident of Hamburg he served one term as 
city attorney, an office to which he was chosen 
by popular vote. His health finally became 
somewhat seriously impaired, and in 1882 he 
took up his abode in Sioux Falls, South Da- 
kota, which state was then still a part of 
the undivided territory of Dakota. There ho 
engaged in the newspaper business, by estab- 
lishing the Daily At-gvs. of which he became 
editor and publisher. This is now the lead- 
ing daily paper of the state of South Dakota. 
In 1886 Mr. Wynn disposed of his interests 
in the newspaper business and became a rep- 
resentative of the Michigan INFntual Life In- 



surance Company, of Detroit, for which he 
was an agent in Illinois and Iowa. Later he 
represented the Northwestern Life Insurance 
Company-, of Milwaukee, in the territory of 
Dakota, and the Mutual Benefit in Nebraska. 
During this time he made a close and pro- 
found study of the scientific basis and ge- 
neric methods and principles of the life in- 
surance business, in connection with which 
he is now a recognized authority. 

After having made a splendid record as an 
underwriter, Mr. Wynn returned to Indian- 
apolis in the year 1892. and here he became 
associated with others in the organization of 
a stock company which was duly incorporated 
under the title of the Atlas Life Insurance 
Company and of which he became actuary 
and manager. The precipitation of the panic 
of 1893 made inexpedient the attempt to 
build up at that time a new company of this 
kind, and the Atlas Company reinsured its 
business and retired from* the field. Mr. 
Wynn then assumed the ofBce of Indiana 
state manager for the Fidelity Mutual Life 
Insurance Company, of Philadelphia. 

In 1894 jNIr. Wynn associated himself with 
Andrew M. Sweeney and Samuel Quinn and 
effected the organization of the State Life 
Insurance Company, of which be was the 
original promoter. As Indiana had at that 
time no legal reserve law covering the life 
insurance business, the company was organ- 
ized under the assessment law, and was in- 
corporated in September, 1894. Mr. Wynn, 
as the original actuary and secretary of the 
company, placed its business on an old-line 
basis from the initiation of operations, and 
at no time did the company issue any policy 
that failed to require the payment in advance 
of the full and regidar old-line standard par- 
ticipating rate. From the beginning the com- 
pany regularly valued its policies and main- 
tained full old-line reserves. For this reason, 
while still operating under the assessment law 
in Indiana, it was admitted to do business in 
Ohio as a regiilar legal-reserve company. ^Ir. 
Wynn has been secretary and actuary from 
the beginning of operations and has served as 
vice-president of the company since March, 
1907. 

Aside from all personal considerations Mr. 
WjTin has done a work which entitles him 
to lasting commendation and esteem in In- 
diana—a work which brought about the cor- 
rection of many abuses of the life insurance 
business in the state and that gives adequate 
protection to those who seek indemnity 
throiigh this source. He was the author of 
Ihe famous legal-reserve deposit law of In- 
diana, which requires all companies ineor- 



HISTOEY OF GEEATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



ni 



porated thereunder to maintain with the 
state a deposit of the full net cash value of 
all outstanding policies, and he was also 
largely instrumental in securing the enact- 
ment of this bill by the legislature. The State 
Life Insurance Company itself was the first 
to be incorporated under the provisions ot 
the new law. It may be said that this law 
has been of incalculable value in inspiring 
public confidence in Indiana companies and 
in making the capital city an insurance cen- 
ter. The State Life Insurance Company now 
controls a very large and substantial busi- 
ness, and the same shows a constantly cumu- 
lative tendency, thus offering assurance of 
popular appreciation of its solidity and of the 
advantages offered by it in its assigned field 
of indemnity. 

Mr. Wynn exemplified all the elements of 
loyal and public-spirited citizenship and is a 
firm believer in the trreat future of the capi- 
tal city, whose remarkable industrial and 
civic progress within later years he has noted 
with all of satisfaction. In politics he is 
aligned as a stanch advocate of the principles 
and policies of the Democratic party. 

He is identified with the Commercial, the 
Century, the I^niversity, and the Country 
Clubs, of Indianapolis. 

In the year 1879, was solemnized the mar- 
riage of Mr. Wynn to Miss Kate Slack, who 
was born at Mount Savage, Maryland, and 
who is a daughter of the late Cornelius Slack, 
who was long a prominent official of the Bal- 
timore & Ohio Railroad, maintaining his res- 
idence in Cumberland, Maryland, and who 
was a representative of old and honored fam- 
ilies of Maryland and Virginia. Mr. and 
Mrs. Wynn have two children — Gladys, who 
is the wife of C. Edgar Elliott, of Indianap- 
olis, and Iris, who is the wife of J. G. Van 
Winkle, now of Chicago. 

Hon. Lewis C. Walker. Among the old- 
est and most honored members of the Indian- 
apolis bar, Hon. Lewis C. Walker has been 
both an active and successful practitioner and 
took a verj' prominent part in the reorganiza- 
tion of the courts of the state. He was a 
member of the general assembly of Indiana, 
and his high record in connection with the 
judiciary of the state was further increased 
by his twelve years' able service as .iudge of 
the Superior Court. Mr. Walker is a native 
of Ohio, born on a farm near Wilmington, 
December 4, 1837, of substantial English 
lineage. His American ancestors first settled 
in the rich valley of the Shenandoah, Vir- 
ginia, whence his grandparents moved to 
Ohio. The judge's boyhood in Ohio was one 
of industry and hard work, developing strong 

Vol. II— 9 



trivts of self-reliance. He had obtained a 
fair English education by attending the win- 
ter terms of the colmtry schools and his men- 
tal training was continued in the Wilming- 
ton, Ohio, Academy and the Southwestern 
Normal School at Lebanon, Ohio. He grad- 
uated from the latter with high honors, and 
entered the office of Judge A. W. Dnan ot 
Wilmington, and began the study of law. 
Upon his admission to the bar he associated 
himself with his preceptor and soon rose to 
local prominence, both in his profession and 
in Republican politics. 

It was rather against his personal wishes 
that he was elected mayor of Wilmington, 
but having assumed the office it was charac- 
teristic of him that he performed his duties 
with entire faithfulness and efficiency. Tlfe 
result was that his popularity increased and 
he was twice elected to the office of prosecut- 
ing attorney of the county. He also served 
as chairman of, the Republican County Com- 
mittee. In 1869 Mr. Walker located at Rich- 
mond, Indiana, there engaged in partnership 
in the practice of law with his brother, Hon. 
Calvin B. Walker, later appointed United 
States Deputy Commissioner of Pensions. 
Mr. Walker became a representative of the 
general assembly of Indiana in 1872, from 
Wayne County, and during the two terms of 
his service in that capacity was chairman of 
the judiciary committee at both sessions. He 
largely contributed to the abolishment of the 
Common Pleas Court, and he also aided in 
the reorganization of the state into new cir- 
cuits, and in a thorough revision of the di- 
vorce laws of Indiana. 

Judge Walker came to Indianapolis in 
1873, and has since been a continuous resi- 
dent, a progressive citizen and prominent 
practitioner at the bar. He was a member of 
the well-known law firm of Ritter, Walker 
& Ritter from 1873 to 1880 when he was elect- 
ed judge of the Superior Court. He served 
in that position with honor and distinction for 
twelve years, always with impartiality and 
dignity as a judge ; his decisions being so 
based upon sound principles that few of them 
were ever reversed by the higher courts. 
Since leaving the bench, he has had an ex- 
tended and high-class practice, and his great 
undisturbed geniality contributed to his 
standing. For many years he has been an 
elder of the Second Presbyterian Church, 
and is a Mason of the Knight Templar de- 
gree. In 1870 Judge Walker married Miss 
Camilla Farquhar, daughter of Dr. Allen 
Farquhar, formerly of Portsmouth, Ohio, and 
their only child, Camilla, became the wife of 
Howard A. Bill, of Richmond, Indiana. 



HISTORY OF GKEATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



Edward Daniels is the junior member of 
the well-known law firm of Baker and Dain- 
iels, who have established a large general 
practice in the local state courts. He is a na- 
tive of Greene County, Ohio, born November 
11, 1854, and is a son of Joseph J. and Clar- 
issa J. (Blessing) Daniels. His father was 
a well-known general contractor and most of 
the childhood of Edward was spent at Rock- 
ville, Indiana, where he received a common 
school education, and afterward became a 
student at the Wabash College, from which 
he graduated in 1875, commencing his pro- 
fessional studies at Columbia University law 
school in 1876. In the fall of the year 1877 
Mr. Daniels located in Indianapolis. and en- 
tered the law office of Baker, Hord & Hen- 
dricks as a student, being admitted to prac- 
tice in 1879. 

In 1880 Mr. Datiiels became associated with 
Albert Baker in the practice of law and since 
that time they have been identified in a grow- 
ing and select practice. Aside from his high 
standing as a lawyer, he has become quite 
widely known in literary circles, having for 
the past twenty-five years been a member of 
the Indianapolis Literary Club. He also 
served as the first president of the Columbia 
Club. He is both a popular and highly re- 
spected citizen. His wife, to whom he was 
married in 1887, was known in her maiden 
days as Virginia Johnston. 

John E. Scott. A prominent and able 
member of the Indiana bar is John Eugene 
Scott, who has here been engaged in the gen- 
eral practice of his profession since 1874, 
and who has attained to success and. prestige 
through his close application, marked re- 
sourcefulness and broad and exact technical 
information. He is an effective advocate be- 
fore court or jury, a conservative and well 
fortified counselor, and he has long retained 
a clientage of essentially representative char- 
acter. 

John Eugene Scott was born on a farm in 
St. Clair County, Illinois, on the 20th of 
January, 1851, and is a son of John and 
Susan A. (Hart) Scott, both of whom were 
likewise natives of Illinois, where the respec- 
tive families were founded in the pioneer 
epoch in the history of that commonwealth. 
The father of John Scott was a native of 
Virginia and was of stanch Scotch-Irish line- 
age. John Scott was reared and educated in 
Illinois and there he continued to be actively 
engaged in agricultural pursuits until his 
death, which occurred when the subject of 
this review was six months of age. His wife 
survived him nearly fifty-eight years and died 
May 28, 1909, at the age of eighty-five years 



and five months. She passed the closing days 
of her life in Indianapolis and Chicago.' Oi 
the four children two' are now living. 

He whose name initiates this article passed 
his childhood and early youth on the farm 
and his preliminary education was secured 
in the public schools of his native state, after 
which he attended McKendree College, at 
Lebanon, Illinois, for a time, after which he 
was matriculated in the Illinois Wesleyan 
University, at Bloomington, Illinois, in which 
well ordered institution he was graduated as 
a member of the class of 1873, duly receiving 
his well earned degree of Bachelor of Arts. 
He thereafter studied law under the able 
preceptorship of the firm of McNulta, Aldrich 
and Kerrick, of Bloomington, Illinois, and 
was admitted to the bar in 1874, since which 
year he has given his attention to the work 
of his profession, which he has honored by his 
loyalty and able services. In 1874 Mr. Scott 
took up his residence in Indianapolis, and 
here he soon won for himself a secure place 
as an able and worthy member of his chosen 
profession, besides which he has ever com- 
manded unqualified confidence and esteem in 
the community which has represented his 
home for a quarter of a century. 

In polities Mr. Scott has ever given an un- 
swerving allegiance to the Republican party, 
and he has been an effective exponent of its 
principles and policies. In 1900 he was the 
candidate of his party for the office of judge 
of the Superior Court, but the decisive Demo- 
cratic victory of that year brought defeat to 
the entire Republican ticket.- In 1893 Mr. 
Scott was appointed city attorney, of which 
office he continued incumbent for two years, 
making an admirable record in handling the 
municipal interests demanding his attention. 

Upon taking up his residence in Indianap- 
olis, Mr. Scott entered into a law partnership 
with Ambrose P. Stanton, and the firm of 
Stanton & Scott continued in successful busi- 
ness about fourteen years, after which Mr. 
Scott became associated in practice with Al- 
bert Rabb under the firm name of Scott & 
Rabb. This professional alliance obtained un- 
til 1904, when a dissolution took place, and 
since that time Mr. Scott has had as his pro- 
fessional coadjutor his son Elmer E., under 
the title of Scott & Scott. The son was for a 
time a student in the law department of the 
University of California and later continued 
his professional studies in the Indiana Law 
School, in Indianapolis, in which latter in- 
stitution he was graduated as a member of 
the class of 1903, with the degree of Bach 
elor of Laws. The father was for a numbei 
of years a member of the faculty of Indinna 



JllSTOKY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



773 



Law Sehool and proved an effective and pop- 
ular instructor. Both Mr. Scott and his son 
hold membership in the Indianapolis Bar As- 
sociation. The subject of this sketch was the 
president of the Indianapolis Bar Association 
for the year 190B. He is a member of the 
Commercial and Columbia Clubs, and a char- 
ter member of the Marion Club. He is affil- 
iated with the Phi Gamma Delta college fra- 
ternity and he and his wife hold member- 
ship in the Meridian Street Methodist Epis- 
copal Church. 

On the 24th of December, 1874, Mr. Scott 
was united in marriage to Miss Mary A. Crist, 
who was born in Ohio, a daughter of the late 
Dr. Daniel 0. Crist, who removed to Illinois 
when she was a child. She was reared and 
educated in the latter state and her marriage 
to Mr. Scott was solemnized in the city of 
Bloomington, Illinois. They have one son, re- 
ferred to above. 

Robert G. McClure, who is the able sec- 
retary of the Indianapolis Commercial Club 
and controls large industrial interests of that 
city, as well as several mining enterprises in 
the southwest, is a citizen of great practical 
abilities and one of the foremost representa- 
tives of Greater Indianapolis. His broad and 
pronounced business successes were achieved 
in Tennessee and Missouri, prior to his com- 
ing to Indianapolis as secretary and treasurer 
of the National Refining Company's Indiana 
field. Mr. McClure has also attained wide 
prominence in Sunday school and fraternal 
work; so that altogether his career and his 
life have been well balanced and rounded and 
have evinced a manly zeal in the promotion 
of both the practical and the higher forces 
of American progress. 

Of stanch Scotch-Irish stock, Robert Green 
McClure is of a family which was founded 
in the south in the colonial period of the 
country. He himself is a native of Lewis- 
burs, Marsihall County, Tennessee, born on 
the~29th of May, 1862, and is a son of Dr. 
Robert G. and Mary Elizabeth (Ewing) Mc- 
Clure. His father was born at Greenville, 
that state, and divided the labors of his life 
between bis medical practice and hig agricul- 
tural pursuits. He served his country as an 
officer in the Mexican War. While of south- 
ern birth and ancestry, he was earnestly op- 
posed to disunion and used every eifort to 
influence his community against secession. 
But when hostilities were actually commenced 
he was precipitated into the conflict and 
served with distinction as lieutenant colonel 
of the Forty-first Tennessee Regiment. In 
1881 he died at Lewisburg, being fifty-seven 
vears of age, and a recognized public charac- 



ter of pronounced ability and unquestioned 
integrity. Colonel McClure was one of the 
promoters and first president of the Duck 
River Valley Railroad, now a branch of the 
Nashville and Chattanooga Railroad, running 
from Columbia to Decherd, Tennessee, and 
was prominent in all the public, professional 
and religious affairs of his community. Both 
he and his wife were zealous members of the 
Presbyterian Church, in which he was an 
elder for a quarter of a century. His mother, 
Mrs. Robert G. McClure, was born in Mar- 
shall County, Tennessee, October 2, 1828, and 
died at Anniston, Alabama, November 20, 
1906, while on a visit to her daughter, Mrs. 
John B. Knox. She was a daughter of Lyle 
A. Ewing, an extensive and influential land 
owner of Marshall County, who had migrated 
from Virginia, the ancestral state. A woman 
of culture and gracious manners, active in 
social, intellectual and religious affairs, she 
invariably left' the impress of gentle and no- 
ble womanhood. One of her brothers and 
one of her sons are clergymen of the Presby- 
terian Church, with which the family has 
been identified for generations. 

Robert G. McClure, of this biography, re- 
ceived a public-school and a high-school edu- 
cation in his native town and in 1879 was a 
student in the University of Mississippi. The 
following two^ years he attended the South- 
western Presbyterian University at Clarks- 
ville, Tennessee, but was then obliged to 
withdraw because of a nervous collapse from 
which he did not recuperate for some time. 
Mr. McClure had already demonstrated his 
business inclinations and talents in various 
boyish and youthful enterprises, having had 
a taste of printing and the life of a railroad 
newsboy (on pas.senger trains between St. 
Louis and Indianapolis) ; but his first seri- 
ous business employment was in 1882-4, when 
he was bookkeeper for the Jesse French Mu- 
sic Company, of Nashville, Tennessee. For 
the ensuing two years he was a piano sales- 
man, traveling out of the same city for R. 
Dorman and Company, and in 1886 went to 
Kansas City, Missouri, where six months aft- 
er his arrival, he became bookkeeper for the 
Bank of Commerce, retaining the position for 
two years. 

In the summer of 1889 Mr. McClure ac- 
cepted a position with the Standard Oil Com- 
pany as its salesman for northern Missouri, 
with headquarters in Kansas City. While 
"holding down" this position with hLs usual 
energj' and business finesse, he secured three 
sueee.ssive prizes offered by the company for 
the best percentage of increased sales, being 
in the running with twelve competitors. In 



774 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



18fll the Standard appointed him special 
salesman for the territory compriidng Mis- 
souri and Kansas, and in 1893 he became aud- 
itor for the same territory. In 189-4 he was 
transferred to New Orleans as assistant man- 
ager of the company at that point, but after 
a year resigned that position and left the 
employ of the great corporation with the 
hearty appreciation and the best wishes of its 
entire management. In the meantime Mr. 
McClure had read law at various intervals, 
and in 1895 received a certificate of admis- 
sion to the bar from the supreme court of 
Tennessee, after which he engaged in prac- 
tice at his native town until the summer of 
1897. At that time he again identified him- 
self with the oil business by becoming a 
stockholder in the National Refining. Com- 
pany, of Cleveland, Ohio, being elected sec- 
retary and treasurer of its Indiana branch— 
the Indiana oil-tank line, with headquarters 
in Indianapolis. Under his administration of 
these vital executive offices the business of 
the company increased seventy per cent from 
1897 to 1904, and in the summer of the lat- 
ter year he sold his interests in the Indiana 
oil-tank line, with a view of organizing an 
oil, paint and supply business on a larger 
scale. It should be added that from 1902 to 
1904 he was also president and about one- 
fourth owner of the American Oil and Re- 
fining Company, producers of oil, coal and 
gas in Kentucky fields. In 1896-7 he was 
owner and publisher of a newspaper in Nash- 
ville, Tennessee, and at the same time was 
senior partner of the firm of McClure and 
Ferguson, insurance and loan agents of that 
city, .^t the present time, besides being ac- 
tively engaged in the work of the secretary- 
ship of the Indianapolis Commercial Club, 
he is the owner of interests in copper and 
lead mines in Arizona, is a stockholder in 
various Indianapolis industrial corporations, 
has considerable real estate investments in the 
city, and has a beautiful residence at No. 
1820 North Delaware street. He has been 
a member of the Commercial Club since 
1902; served as a director and chairman of 
the House committee in 1904 and was elected 
secretary in the same year. He represented 
the club at the banquet of the Greater Des 
Moines (Iowa) committee in November, 1906, 
and at this gathering, which was attended 
by officers of the Commercial clubs of Minne- 
apolis and Denver, he delivered an effective 
addres.s in which he apparently demonstrated 
to the citizens of the Iowa city that it was 
to their vital interests, if they wished to be 
in the van of municipal prqeress, to secure a 
new city charter based .largely on that of In- 



dianapolis; for it is certain that Des iloines 
subsequently adopted a new system of city 
government patterned after the strong points 
of the Indianapolis and Galv^ton charters. 
Since he has been secretary of this great civic 
power, its membership has increased from 840 
to 1,800. In politics Mr. McClure has sup- 
ported the principles of the Republican party 
from the time he was able to vote, and even 
before, and since residing in Indianapolis 
has served for many years on the city com- 
mittee of his party, and has otherwise been 
of stanch service to the cause. 

On January 2, 1884, Mr. McClure was mar- 
ried at the Madison Presbyterian Church, 
near Nashville, to Miss Locke J. Bradford, 
daughter of George and Narcissa (Brown) 
Bradford, of that city. Mr. Bradford was 
of the well-known Massachusetts family and 
a representative member .of the bar, while his 
wife was a daughter of the late Colonel Lu- 
cien Brown, who served with great credit in 
the war with Mexico and in the Confederacy 
and was of old southern ancestry. Mr. and 
Mrs. McClure became the parents of two chil- 
dren, as follows : One who died in infancy, 
and Robert L., who was born April 10, 1894, 
and is a student at the Shortridge high school, 
Indianapolis. Mr. McClure 's connection with 
religious and fraternal affairs has already 
l)een noted and in further explanation of 
these phases of his career the facts which 
follow are adduced. When sixteen years of 
age he became a raember of the Good Tem- 
plars and in 1887,' when twenty-five, united 
with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 
In 1903 he became affiliated with the Masonic 
fraternity, in which he has completed the cir- 
cle of both the York and Scottish rites; in 
the latter he has attained to the thirty-second 
degree; is a Mystic Shriner and (1909) Wor- 
shipful Master of Ancient Landmarks Lodge 
No. 319, A. F. and A. M. At Indianapolis, 
he has also been identified with the Marion 
Club since 1897, the German House since 
1908, and the Board of Trade, and a member 
of the Knights of P.^'thias, Indianapolis 
Lodge No. 56, for many years. His greatest 
activity in church and Sunday school work 
was during the twenty years prior to be- 
coming a resident of Indianapolis. In 1896 
he was vice president of the Termessee State 
Sunday School Association (interdenomina- 
tional) and at different times he has lectured 
and conducted other public work in this di- 
rection. 

Eli F. Ritter. A representative member 
of the bar of his native state and one who 
went forth to honor this commonwealth 
through his able services as a valiant soldier 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



775 



of tlie Union, Colonel Eli F. Ritter has long 
controlled a large practice in the capital city 
of Indiana, where he has ever commanded un- 
equivocal confidence and esteem as a man of 
sterlinCT attributes of character and as a citi- 
zent of insistent loyalty and public spirit. 

Eli F. Ritter was born on the parental 
homestead farm in Gilford Township, Hen- 
dricks County, Indiana, on the 18th of June, 
1838. and is a scion of one of the honored 
pioneer families of the state. His ancestors 
were members of the Society of Friends and 
from Xorth Carolina came the original repre- 
sentatives in Indiana, where settlement was 
made by then). He is a son of James and 
Rachel (Jessup) Ritter, both of whom were 
born in North Carolina, where they passed 
their early lives and where the father fol- 
lowed the vocation of farming, coming to 
Hendricks County, Indiana, about 1822. Both 
were residents of Hendricks County at the 
time of their death, and to them was accorded 
the high regard of all who knew them. They 
held membership, by birthright, in the So- 
ciety of Friends, and in politics the father 
was originally a Whig and later a Republi- 
can. He died in 1859, and his wife was sum- 
moned to the life eternal in 1874. They be- 
came the parents of four sons and three 
daughters and of the number one son and one 
of the daughters are now living, the subject 
of this sketch being the youngest son. 

To the common schools of his native coun- 
ty Colonel Ritter is indebted for his early ed- 
ucational discipline, which was supplemented 
by a course in DePauw University, then 
known as Asbury University, in which insti- 
tution he was graduated with the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts as a member of the class of 
1866, but was dated back to class of 1863. as 
he was in the army. He then took up the 
study of law, to which he devoted his atten- 
tion until he felt the call of higher duty, 
when the integrity of the nation was thrown 
into jeopardy through armed rebellion. On 
the 14th of April, 1861, he enlisted as a pri- 
vate in Company K, Sixteenth Indiana Vol- 
unteer Infantry, and he continued in active 
service until the close of the war, having re- 
ceived his honorable discharge on the 6th of 
June, 1865. From his original command he 
was transferred to Seventy-ninth Indiana 
Volunteer Infantry, which was a part of the 
Army of the Cumberland, and with this reg- 
iment the major part of his service was given. 
He was made adjutant in this regiment and 
with it participated in many of the import- 
ant battles marking the progress of the great 
internecine conflict. Among these may be 
mentioned Stone's River, Chickamauga, Mis- 



sionary Ridge, Rocky Face Ridge, 
New Hope Church, Kenesaw Mountain, the 
siege and battle of Atlanta. Lovejoy Station, 
and Franklin and Nashville, Tennessee. Be- 
fore the expii'ation of the war he was ad- 
vanced to the office of major of his regiment, 
and in the same his record was one of signal 
gallantry and able discipline. In 1883, upon 
the organization of the Indiana National 
Guard, Governor Porter appointed him col- 
onel of the First Regiment, and he retained 
this incumbency for a period of three years, 
at the expiration of which he retired from ac- 
tive work in the organization. 

After the close of the war Colonel Ritter 
resumed the study of law, and' in the spring 
of 1866 he was duly admitted to the bar of 
his native state, whereupon he engaged in the 
general practice of his profession in Indian- 
apolis, of whose bar he has been an honored 
member for more than forty years— years 
marked by large and definite accomplishment 
in the work of his chosen vocation. He has 
retained a large and representative clientage 
and has been identified with much important 
litigation in both State and Federal courts. 
He is a strong trial lawyer, making a close 
study of every eau^e presented and marshal- 
ing his evidence with great skill and versa- 
tility of expedient. His thorough and broad 
knowledge of the science of jurisprudence 
ha.s also made him a specially effective factor 
as a counselor. It should be noted in this 
connection that Colonel Ritter has, almost 
from the initiation of his professional career, 
taken a strong stand in bringing about the 
proper regulation of the liquor traffic, of 
which he is an implacable adversary. He has 
secured many important court decisions in 
both the lower and higher courts as touching 
this important matter, and his zeal and en- 
thusiasm have been of the most insistent type. 
Colonel Ritter is the author of a book that 
has attracted wide and favorable attention. 
It has to do with a consideration of the cor- 
relation of the moral and civil law, and in 
a masterly way carried forward the argument 
that social morality is the fundamental prin- 
ciple of the common law and all statute law, 
anrl that no law can be sustained that lacks 
this foundation. The title of this admirable 
work is Moral Laic and Civil Law. Parts of 
the Same Thing. 

In politics, while never a seeker for the 
honors or emoluments of public office. Col- 
onel Ritter has ever been arrayed as a stal- 
wart in the camp of the Republican party, 
though independent, and he has rendered ef- 
fective service in behalf of its. cause. He and 
his wife hold membership in the Methodist 



776 



HISTOKY OF GKEATEK IjNDIANAPOLIS. 



Episcopal Church, and he is a member of 
George H. Thomas Post, Grand Aniiy of the 
Kepublic. His vital interest in his old com- 
rades in arms is further shown in the able 
service he has accorded as a member of the 
board of trustees of the Indiana Soldiers' 
Home, with which he was identified in this 
capacity since 1903. his second term havint; 
expired February, 1909. 

On the 13th of July, 1863, was solemnizeil 
the marriage of Colonel Ritter to Miss Narcie 
Lockwood, who was born in Paris, Kentucky, 
and who is a daughter of Benjamin and 
Jlebecea (Smith)- Lockwood, who passed the 
closing years of their lives at Indianapolis 
with Mrs. Ritter. Colonel and Mrs. Ritter 
have three sons and two daughters* living, one 
son being deceased. They are as follows: 
Halsted L., a Denver, Colorado, attorney; 
Herman B., who died at the age of twenty- 
one; Roscoe H., a physician in Indianapolis; 
Mary B., married Chas. A. Beard, of New 
York City; Dwight S., a manufacturer in 
Columbus, Ohio; and Ruth, wife of Edgar 
V. McDaniel, of Parma, Missouri. 

Joseph Kjnne Sharpe, Jr., represents one 
of the earliest as well as one of the most prom- 
inent families to be identified with the his- 
tory of Indianapolis— his birthplace, on the 
21st of September, 1853. He is a son of the 
late Joseph Kinne Sharpe and Mary Ellen 
Graydon Sharpe and a grandson on the ma- 
ternal side of Alexander Graydon, who came 
to Indianapolis in 1839 from Harrisburg, 
Pennsylvania, where he had been engaged in 
business. Mr. Graydon was born in 1775; 
was a soldier in the War of 1812, and died 
in the early seventies. His wife was Jane 
McKinney. and both families are prominent 
in the history of Pennsylvania. Mr. and 
Mrs. Graydon were leading citizens in Har- 
rLsburg, Pennsylvania. They were first 
among the abolitionists and their ancestors 
were noted in the War for Independence. 
Joseph Kinnie Sharpe, Sr., was born in Pom- 
fre^, Connecticut, in 1819. He was the son of 
Abishai Sharpe and Hannah Trowbridge 
Sharpe. His family connection embraces 
many of the leading families of New Eng- 
land, the Trowbridge. Grosvenor, Farrington, 
Goodalls and others— all prominent in their 
professions and business. Mr. Sharpe 's an- 
cestors were all patriots in the Revolutionary 
War. ■ He was the youngest of seven brothers, 
and came west in his very early manhood. 
He taught schocjl in Ohio for several years 
and then came' to Indianapolis in 1845, where 
he embarked in business— the wholesale leath- 
er—and was owner of several tanneries. He 
'ater becanip greatly interested in real estate 



and owned much valuable propertj- in the 
residence and business parts of Indianapolis, 
as well as large farms throughout the state 
and adjacent to the capital city. Some of the 
fine additions to the city are a result of his 
judgment and foresight. He was a man of 
fine personal appearance and of magnetic 
manners and was known for his many benevo- 
lences. He belonged to the fraternal order 
of Odd Fellows, and was a member of the 
Second Presbyterian Church, over which 
Henry Ward Beecher then presided. In fact, 
Mr. Sharpe was married to Marj- Ellen 
Graydon in 1849 by that able divine, who ac- 
companied the young couple on their wed- 
ding journey to New England. Both Mr. 
and Mrs. Sharpe were members of the choir 
in the Second Presbyterian Church and were 
noted for their beautiful voices. Mrs. Sharpe, 
who is still living, was, during her earlier 
life, a leading musician of Indianapolis, hav- 
ing had fine training in her school in Phila- 
delphia. She was not only a high class mu- 
sician both of the piano and as a singer, but 
was a writer of ability. While yet a girl she 
was an assistant editor of the Locomotive, a 
prominent periodical during the early history 
of Indianapolis, and for many years was a 
constant contributor to our leading maga- 
zines. She is specially known for her religious 
poems, and for her stories and verses for 
children that have appeared in the St. Nich- 
olas magazine and othei-s. In 1909, Mrs. 
Sharpe, then past her four-score years, wrote 
and had published A Family Retrospect, a 
history of her family from their settlement in 
Philadelphia in 1708 to the present time. As 
her ancestors are closely identified with the 
history of Philadelphia and Pennsylvania, it 
is a book that has much historical as well as 
literary value. Mrs. Sharpe is still living in 
Indianapolis ; her hu.sband died in 1900. Nine 
children were born of this union, but only 
the following four are now living: Mary 
Ella, wife of Robert P. Duncan ; Joseph 
Kinne, Julia Graydon and Anna Trowbridge. 
One of the interesting incidents in the ear- 
lier life of Mr. and Mrs. Sharpe was their 
overland trip to Madison, Indiana, to hear the 
famous Jenny Lind sing. This was during 
the renowned singer's first visit to America 
and she sang in a barn in that city. 

Joseph Kinne Sharpe. Jr., received his edu- 
cation in the schools and old Academy in In- 
dianapolis and at Wabash College, and fol- 
lowing his college days he engaged in busi- 
ness with his father, later succeeding him in 
the wholesale leather trade. In 1891 he went 
out of it to become the secretary and treasurer 
of the Indianapolis Manufacturiiig Company 



HISTORY OF GEEATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



and in 1908 was made the president of this 
association. Mr. Sharpe has been most suc- 
cessful in business, as he is enterprising, de- 
voted and broad-minded. His benevolences 
are many, and his generosity is proverbial. 
He is an ideal friend and one who is never 
appealed to in vain. He is one of the promi- 
nent men in business and social circles of the 
city; a member of the Commercial Club, the 
University, Columbia and Country Clubs, the 
Phi Delta Theta fraternity, the Art Associa- 
tion and other associations of civic and per- 
sonal interest. He is also a thirty-second de- 
gree Mason, belonging to Oriental Lodge, No. 
fiOO, F. & A. M.: Keystone Chapter, No. 6, 
R. A. M. ; Raper Commandery, No. 1, K. T. ; 
Indianapolis Council, No. 2, R. and S. M. ; 
Indiana Consistory, S. P. R. S., and Murat 
Temple, A. A. 0. N. M. S. His politics are 
Republican. 

Mr. Sharpe married Alberta S. Johnson in 
1891. She was born in Athens, Ohio, a 
daughter of Dr. AVilliam P. and Julia 
^Blackstone) Johnson, both of whom were na- 
tives of Ohio. Dr. Johnson was a surgeon in 
the Civil "War and was later associated with 
Dr. Allen's Surgical Institute in Indianap- 
olis, yirs. Sharpe is now the surviving mem- 
ber of their family of .seven children. A 
daughter, Josephine P., has been born to ]\Ir. 
and Mrs. Sharpe. 

Bern.\rd J. T. Jeup. As a civil engineer 
Bernard J. T. Jeup has attained to high pro- 
fessional success and prestige, having been 
identified with much important work in the 
line of the vocation for M'hich he ha.s so admir- 
ably equipped himself, and his services in 
connection with umnieipal improvements in 
Indianapolis have been of great value. He 
was formerly inciuiibent of the office of city 
engineer, and in this position he made a rec- 
ord unexcelled by that of any other incum- 
bent of the same. He is essentially one of 
the loyal, progressive and public-spirited citi- 
zens of the Indiana capital and is known as 
.me of its reliable and representative business 
men. In the work of his profession he is as- 
sociated with A. H. ^loore, under the firm 
name of Jeup & ^Moore, with offices in the 
Indiana Trust Building. 

'Mr. Jeup is a native of the city of Cincin- 
nati, Ohio, where he was born on the 17th of 
August, 1864, and he is a son of John B. and 
Anna G. (Wirtz) Jeup, both of whom were 
born and reared in Germany, being repre- 
sentatives of old and hom-red families of the 
great empire. John B. Jeup was a man of 
distinguished ability and high intellectuality, 
and for many years he was prominently 
identified with newspaper work, in connection 



with which he held various editorial posi- 
tions of importance. He removed from Cin- 
cinnati to Nashville, Tennessee, in 1871, and 
there he continued his residence for a period 
of seven years, at the expiration of which he 
returned to Cincinnati, where he contin- 
ued to maintain his home for about seven 
years. He then removed to Brooklyn, 
New York, where -he continued to reside 
until 1893, when he came to Indianapolis, 
where both he and his devoted wife 
passed the residue of their lives. He was at 
one time editor and publisher of the Cin- 
cinnati Volksfreund, and while a resident of 
Brooklyn he was political editor of the New 
York Staatszeituiig, a Democratic daily. On 
coming to Indianapolis he became editor and 
part owner of the Telegraph, a German 
weekly paper, and while residing in Nash- 
ville, Tennessee, he was likewise engaged in 
editorial work. He was also elected a mem* 
her of the lower house of the Tennessee leg- 
islature, in which he served one term. He 
maintained his home in Indianapolis about 
fifteen years and here his death occurred in 
1907, at which time he was seventy-nine years 
of age. He was a prolific and versatile 
writer, and in his editorial work he gained 
much distinction, especially in his considera- 
tion of matters of public and general politi- 
cal import. His wife preceded him to 
eternal rest by several years, her death oc- 
curring in 1900. He was a stanch Democrat 
in his political affiliation and both he and his 
wife were zealous members of the Catholic 
Church. Of their .seven children, three are 
now living. 

Bernard J. T. Jeup was seven years of 
age at the time of the family removal from 
Cincinnati to Nashville, where he continued 
to attend the public schools until the family 
returned to Cincinnati, about seven years 
iater. In the latter city he completed the cur- 
i-icnhun of the Woodward high school, in 
which he was graduated as a member of the 
class of 1883. For a year thereafter he con- 
tinued his studies in the Ihiiversity of Cin- 
cinnati, and he was then matriculated in Co- 
lumbia Fniversity, New York City, in which 
historic old institution he completed the pre- 
scribed course in civil engineering and was 
graduated in 1887. with the degree of civil 
engineer. He has since given his attention 
to the work of his profession and has achieved 
in the same unqualified success and marked 
precedence. For several years after leaving 
the university he was eniployiMl in connection 
mth the work of the board of health of New 
York Citv. in which connection he was iden- 
tified with the cnnsti-uction of sewerace lines. 



778 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



He came to Indianapolis in 1892 and here es- 
tablished himself in the work of his profes- 
sion, and in 1893 he was appointed assistant 
city engineer, under the administration of 
Mayor Thomas L. Sullivan. He retained this 
position also during the mayoralty of Caleb 
S. Denny, and thereafter served for six years 
as city engineer under the administration of 
Mayor Thomas Taggart and two years during 
the regime of John W. Holtzman as chief 
executive of the municipal government. Dur- 
ing his long period of service in connection 
with the office of city engineer Mr. Jeup car- 
ried out most effectively the improving of the 
sewerage system of Indianapolis, under the 
plans outlined by Rudolph Hering, the able 
consulting engineer appointed by Mayor Sul- 
livan. Mr. Jeup was a member of the com- 
mission appointed to appraise the value of the 
tangible property of the Indianapolis Water 
Company and made recommendation that the 
city purchase the property. Had this advice 
of the commission been followed the city 
would undoubtedly be the owner of its own 
water sj'stem to-day and in control of a 
service that would prove a source of profit to 
the city and at the same time best conserve 
the demands of the general consumer. Later 
Mr. Jeup was associated with George W. 
Fuller and Dr. C. E. Ferguson as a member 
of the commission appointed bj^ the city to 
investigate both the quantity and quality of 
the physical property of the Indianapolis 
Water Company, with a view to effecting im- 
provements in the distributing service and 
the quality of the water supplied. The rec- 
ommendations of this commission are now be- 
ing followed by the water company in the 
expanding and improving of its system ac- 
cording to the demands placed upon it. These 
brief statements indicate that Mr. Jeup has 
been a valuable agent in connection with the 
directing and regulating of the engineering 
department of the municipal government of 
the capital city, and it is largely due to his 
zealous and able efforts that the water sup- 
ply of the city is maintained at its present 
high standard. He caused a fire station to be 
established to show the water pressure. He 
has also done much to make possible the se- 
curing to the city the elevation of railroad 
tracks at street crossings witliin the munici- 
pal limits, and he has also given most zealous 
aid in providing the city with effective gas 
service at reasonable terms. His efforts in 
this connection are a matter of record and 
have been duly ap]>reciated and commended 
by the leading business men and general pub- 
lic in Indianapolis. In the private work of his 
orofession he has been equally successful and 



has carried through many important engineer- 
ing projects and enterprises. His firm has a 
large and representative clientage and holds 
distinctive precedence among similar concerns 
in the state. ]Mr. Jeup is a valued member 
of the Indiana Civil Engineering Society, a 
member of the Indianapolis Board of Trade 
and the Commercial Club, and at all times he 
manifests a lively interest in all that tends to 
advance the material and civic welfare of his 
home city and state. 

In politics Mr. Jeup Ls aligned as a stanch 
advocate of the cause of the Democratic 
party, he is affiliated with the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks and holds member- 
ship in various civic and social organizations, 
including the Indiana Democratic Club. 

In the year 1895 was solemnized the mar- 
riage of Mr. Jeup to JMiss Enuna Dithmer, 
daughter of Henry L. and Agnes (Seiden- 
sticker) Dithmer, the father being a success- 
ful business man of Indianapolis. Mr. and 
Mrs. Jeup have two children— Florence Gei'- 
tnide, and Bernard Henry. 

WiLLi.\M C. Smock. A scion of one of the 
honored pioneer families of Marion County, 
which has represented his home from the time 
of his nativity. William C. Smock is one of 
the well known and highly esteemed citizens 
of Indianapolis, where he has resided for 
many years and where he has held various 
offices of distinctive public trust. His career 
has designated in a positive way the strength 
of a strong and loyal nature, and to him has 
ever been accorded unqualified confidence and 
regard, indicating the popular appreciation of 
his worthy life and worthy deeds. He is 
now engaged in the practice of law in In- 
dianapolis arid is one of the venerable repre- 
sentatives of his profession in the capital city 
of his native state. 

Mr. Smock has reason to find pride in re- 
verting to his genealogical history, for he is 
a member of a family founded in America 
about the middle of the seventeenth century 
and one that is of the stanch Holland Dutch 
extraction. 

In the quaint old city of Utrecht, Holland, 
was solemnized the marriage of Hendrick 
Matthysen Smock and Geerje Hermann, and 
in the year 1654 this worthy couple came to 
America and become the founders of the fam- 
ily of which the sub,iect of this sketch is a 
worthy scion. They settled on Long Island, 
New York, where Mr. Smoek acquired a 
tract of land, and to the little settlement 
that gradually formed about his .home he ap- 
plied, with affectionate remembrance of his 
fatherland, the name of New Utrecht. The 
names of his children were as follows: Ma- 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



thias, John, Elizabeth, Leondert (Leonard), 
Sarah, Martynje, and Rebecca. 

Mathias Smock was married, in New York, 
on the 13th of September, 1701, to Elizabeth 
Stevens, a widow, and about 1718 they re- 
moved to Piscataway, New Jersey. Their 
children were: Hendrick, Jan (John), Eliz- 
abeth, Lncas, Mathias, Gastie, and Mary. Jan 
(John) Smock and his wife Lena had chil- 
dren whose names and respective dates of 
baptism are here noted: John, April 10, 
17.35: Jacob, May 20, 1744; Gertie (Ger- 
trude), October 26, 1751; Catrina, April 29, 
1753: Abraham, Februarv- 11, 1755; Jan- 
nette (Joan), December 11, 1757; and Bar- 
ney, the date of whose baptism is not given. 
From the lonsr intervals between the bap- 
tisms of the first and second and the second 
and tliird of these children it is probable that 
there were others, whose names were omitted 
in the foregoing list, the data for which were 
obtained from the ancient records of the 
Dutch Church at Raritan, New Jersey. 

John Smock, of this family, married Sarah 
Fontaine, and they figure as the great-grand- 
parents of William C. Smock in the paternal 
line. Jacob Smock, brother of the last men- 
tioned John, married Catharine Demarest, 
daughter of Samuel Demarest, or Demaree, 
and they were the s;reat-grandparents of the 
subject of this review in the maternal line. 
John Smock, son of John and Sarah (Fon- 
taine) Smock, married Ann Van Arsdallen, 
daughter of ^Ma.ior Simon Van Arsdallen, and 
their youngest son. Isaac (youngest son in a 
family of twelve children), was the father of 
him whose name initiates this article. John 
Smock, son of Jacob and Catharine (Dem- 
arest, or Demaree) Smock, married Catharine 
Carnine, daughter of Peter Carnine, and 
their daughter, Ann Terhune Smock, who was 
one of twelve children, was the mother of 
William C. Smock. Three of the latter's 
great-grandfathers. Jacob Smock, Major Si- 
mon Van Arsdallen. and Peter Carnine, were 
valiant and patriotic soldiers in the Conti- 
nental line in the War of the Revolution. 
John and Peter Smock, sons of Jacob and 
Catharine f Demarest 1 Smock, were captured 
by the Indians in Shelby County, Kentucky, 
in 1793. when they were fourteen and twelve 
years of age, respectively. Th'ey were with 
Winemac, a powerful Pottawatomie chief, 
and. through the agency of a French Indian 
trader, were surrendered to their father, at 
Greenville, Ohio, in 3795. The price of ran- 
som was a keg of rum. 

John Smock, son of John and Sarah ( Fon- 
taine'i Smock, married Ann Van Arsdallen, 
as ali^ady noted, and they became the parents 



of twelw children. He died, near Harrods 
burg, Mercer County, Kentucky, on the 5th 
of August, 1824, and his children began to 
immigrate to Indiana in an early day and 
soon after his demise. In 1829 his widow and 
her youngest son, Isaac, came to Indiana, and 
she purchased a large tract of land fronting 
on the Madison road, five miles south of In- 
dianapolis. To this propertj' she took title 
in the names of her twelve children. A large 
part of this land is now (1909) owned by 
E]li Heiny. 

John Smock, son of Jacob and Catharine 
(Demarest) Smock, entered land just south 
of Indianapolis in the year 1821, and the 
same is now known as the Hoefgen farm. In 
1822 he and his family took up their abode 
on this homestead, and at this time his 
daughter Ann Terhune, mother of the subject 
of this review, was not quite two years of 
age. On the farm mentioned the death of 
John Smock occurred on the 10th of Jan- 
uary, 1829, and his wife, Catharine (Car- 
nine) Smock, died on the 11th of September, 
]835. 

Isaac Smock was bom in Mercer County, 
Kentucky, on the 22nd of April, 1817, and 
on the 18th of January, 1838, he was united 
in marriage to Ann Terhune Smock, who was 
born in Kentucky on the 1st of December, 
1820. His death occurred at Southport, Mar- 
ion County, Indiana, on the 4th of February, 
1895, and his cherished and devoted wife was 
summoned to the life eternal on the 8th of 
September, 1906. 

William C. Smock, eldest son of Isaac and 
Ann Terhune (Smock) Smock wa.s born on 
the homestead farm, four miles south of In- 
dianapolis, Indiana, on the 3rd of December, 
1838. At the age of three years he received, 
while at play, an insignificant injury, and this 
afterward resulted in anchylosis of the right 
knee joint, rendering him a permanent crip- 
ple. Mr. Smock received his early educa- 
tional discipline in the common schools in the 
vicinity of his home, and through wide and 
well-directed reading and through the experi- 
ences and association of mature life, he has 
become a man of broad and exact knowledge 
and of marked intellectuality. At the age of 
seventeen years he assumed a clerical position 
in the office of the county recorder of Mar- 
ion County, and when nineteen years of age 
he was matriculated in Franklin College, at 
Franklin, Indiana, where he was a student 
for nearly two years, thus effectively supple- 
menting his earlier educational training. Aft- 
er leaving this institution he devoted his at- 
tention to teaching a country school for two 
terms, and in April, 1860, he secured a posi- 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



tion iu the ofBee of the county clerk, under 
the late Hon. John C. New. In 1862 Mr. 
Smock secured the nomination for the office 
of county recorder of Marion County, but his 
party, wishing to unite all elements in sup- 
port of the prosecution of the war, desired 
to nominate a war Democrat for that office, 
under which conditions Mr. Smock withdrew 
his candidacy and General William J. Elliott, 
a Douglas Democrat, was nominated in his 
stead. Mr. Smock continued his sei-vice in 
the offices of the county clerk, and in Novem- 
ber, 1865, he was himself elected clerk of the 
county, in which position he served five years 
and in which he gave an administration that 
has passed on to record as one commendable 
and able in every respect. One year was 
added to his regular term by* reason of the 
passage of the biennial election law. 

Upon retiring from the office of county 
clerk, Mr. Smock became associated with John 
B. Cleaveland, Ebenezer Smith and Daniel M. 
Ransdell in the real estate business. In No- 
vember, 1878, Mr. Ransdell was elected 
county clerk and Mr. Smock responded to 
the request of his former partner by again 
entering service as a deputy in the office of 
the county clerk, where he continued as an 
able and popular incumbent during the en- 
suing eight years, at the expiration of which 
he resumed his operations in the real estate 
business. In November, 1898, he was electeil 
a justice of the peace for Center Township 
and continued in tenure of this office for eight 
years. As tending to show the popular esti- 
mate placed upon his services in this office it^ 
may he noted that during his incumbency 
of the same he filed more than eleven thou- 
sand seven hundred cases and performed more 
than thirteen hundred marriage ceremonies. 
Since retiring from the office of justice of the 
peace Mr. Smock has been engaged in the 
practice of law, having been admitted to the 
bar of his native state in 1884, and being well 
versed in the minutiae of the science of juris- 
prudence. 

In politics Mr. Smock is well fortified in his 
opinions as to matters of public policy, and 
is arrayed as a stanch supporter of the prin- 
ciples and policies for which the Republican 
party stands sponsor. In February, 1854, 
when seventeen years of age, Mr. Smock be- 
came a member of the Baptist Church, and he 
has long been a zealous and active worker 
in the same. He served for ten years as 
church .clerk, was for many years a member 
of the board of trustees of his church, and for 
seventeen years he presided as superintendent 
of the Sunday school. _ He has been a deacon 
of the church for the past thirty years, and 



he was chorister for thirty-five years and four 
months, having a well trained bass voice and 
taking marked interest in musical affairs. He 
and his wife are now devoted and valued 
members of the First Baptist Church of In- 
dianapolis, and in the capital city their cir- 
cle of friends is limited only by that of their 
acquaintance. 

On the 6th of December, 1860, was solemn- 
ized the marriage of Mr. Smock to ]\Iiss ]Me- 
lissa A. Smock, his- second cousin. She was 
born and reared in Marion County, Indiana, 
and is a daughter of the late Captain Jacob 
Smock. Mr. and Mrs. Smock became the 
parents of six children, of whom only two are 
living— Eva L., who is the wife of Henry 
Schurmann, of Gloucester, Massachusetts, and 
Harry, who is a successful veterinary surgeon, 
engaged in the practice of his profession at 
Franklin, Indiana. 

Charles E. Avekill, a substantial and 
honored member of the Indianapolis bar, is 
a native of Lovell, Oxford County, Maine, 
born April 12, 1853. In 1863 his parents 
moved to Portland, that state, which remained 
the family home for years. The son was first 
educated in the city schools and then entered 
Bowdoin College, from which he graduated 
in 1873. His law studies were self-imposed 
and self-conducted, but to such purpose that 
when he went to Colorado in 1879 he was ad- 
mitted to the bar of that state and located 
at Durango for practice. 

Mr. Averill remained at that city until 
1885, but conditions were then in the forma- 
tive period in the Centennial state and he 
decided that his prospects would be improved 
by locating in some settled, yet progressive 
community of the east. Fixing then upon In- 
dianapolis, he has had no cause to regret his 
choice by any professional or personal events 
which have transpired within the past quar- 
ter of a century. In 1884, the year before 
Mr. Averill became a resident of Indianap- 
olis, he Avas married in Colorado to IMiss Jes- 
sie M. Stubbs, daughter of Hon. George M. 
Stubbs, of that city, and that fact had a 
strong bearing upon his coming to the In- 
diana capital. 

WooDBURN M.vssoN in his youth early be- 
came dependent upon his own resources. He 
had ambition,' courage and persistence, and 
worked his own way in one of the most ex- 
acting of professions, defraying the expenses 
of his technical education and ever placing 
a true value upon men and affairs. It is thus 
pleasing to note that today he is numbered 
among the representative members of the In- 
dianapolis bar and is one of the highly es- 
teemed citizens of his native citv. 







^^^Lg|^ 


M^^t^^^^^^Ih 




^Nk^''^' j^^l^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^H 




aV/^^^l 




,..„£^^KflB^^| 



LEONARD WOOLLEN 




JOSHUA BLACK 



HISTOEY OP GEEATEE INDIANAPOLIS. 



781 



Woodburn Masson was born in Indianap- 
olis, on the 9th of July, 1869, and is a son of 
James P. and Eliza T. (Eoss) Mas.son, the 
former of whom was born in Pennsylvania 
and the latter in Indiana.' The father, who 
was a commercial traveler by vocation, died 
when his son, of this review, was an infant, 
and the widowed mother continued her resi- 
.dence in Indianapolis, where she reared her 
three sons and one dausrhter with all of self- 
abnegation and zealous devotion. She was 
summoned to the life eternal on the 15th 
of March, 1908, and her memory is revered 
by all who came within the sphere of her 
gentle and gracious influence. 

He whose name initiates this article contin- 
ued his studies in the public schools of In- 
dianapolis until he was fifteen years of age, 
when he found it incumbent upon him to as- 
sume practical responsibilities, as his mother 
had met with the loss of her savings and the 
returns from insurance policies held by her 
deceased husband, owing to the failure of the 
bank in which she deposited her funds. Under 
these conditions young Woodburn Masson de- 
voted himself assiduously to learning stenog- 
raphy and typewriting, and to this line of 
work he devoted his attention nearly three 
years after becoming proficient in the same. 
He then began the study of law, in the office 
of the general attorney of the Lake Erie & 
Western Eailroad. in Indianapolis, and later 
he completed a course in the Cincinnati Law 
School in the class of 1895. In 1891 he was 
admitted to the bar of his native city and 
state, where he has since continued in the 
active work of his chosen profession and 
where he has so utilized his fine natural and 
technical powers as to gain a position of 
prominence and a worthy reputation in his 
chosen vocation, to which his devotion and 
loyalty have been of the most insistent order. 
Prom 1891 until 1894 he was assistant to the 
general attorney of the Lake Erie & Western 
Railroad, and since the expiration of that 
period he has devoted his attention to gen- 
eral practice in the State and Pederal courts, 
in which he has won many decisive victories 
as a trial lawyer, while as a counselor he is 
known to be fortified with a broad and exact 
knowledge of the law and to have marked 
facility in the application of such informa- 
tion-. 

The political views of Mr. Masson are indi- 
cated by the zealous service which he has ren- 
dered to the cause of the Democratic party, 
and as a citizen none could be more publicr 
spirited or more zealous in the promotion of 
good government and needed reforms. In all 
measures and enterprises tending to make for 



good citizenship and civic and material prog- 
ress, he lends a ready co-operation, and his 
interest in his native city is deep and abid- 
ing. He and his wife hold membership in 
the Meridian Street Methodist Episcopal 
Church. 

In the year 1904, was solemnized the mar- 
riage of Mr. Masson to ]\Iiss Nellie G. Wells, 
daughter of Dr. Merritt Wells, the oldest 
resident dentist of Indianapolis, and Mrs. 
Masson is popular in connection with the best 
social activities of her home city. 

Leonard Woollen was born near Elli- 
cott's Mills in Maryland in the month of 
June, 1774. Richard Woollen, his father, 
a descendant of John Woollen, who emi- 
grated from England to North Carolina, 
early in the seventeenth century, was a Revo- 
lutionary soldier. He died when Leonard, 
the subject of this sketch, was eight years old. 
The boy, after the death of his father, was 
apprenticed to- a Hickory Quaker who lived- 
in Maryland, and who treated him so cruelly 
as to cause him to run away. After his 
escape, he first got employment on a farm 
for two or three years. He was next em- 
ployed * at Nashville, Tennessee, in Iron 
Works that then were in operation in that 
city. He worked there for six years, and 
then emigrated to Bowman's Station, near 
to Mammoth Cave in Kentucky. There he 
became acquainted with Sarah Henry, to 
whom he was married June 19, 1802. By 
this union twelve children were born. They 
moved from Kentucky to Indianapolis, In- 
diana, in 1835. Upon his arrival in this city, 
he purchased the lot at the corner of Capitol 
avenue and Ohio street, where now is located 
the Imperial Hotel. Upon this he built his 
residence in which he lived until his death, 
which occurred Pebruary 21, 1858, his wife 
having died November 3, 1856. His occupa- 
tion was that of a farmer, and as such he 
purchased a farm which is now a part of the 
Riverside Park. Politically, he was a Demo- 
crat. Both he and his wife were members of 
the Christian Church, and as such assisted 
in organizing the First Christian Church of 
this city, the church building of which was 
located on Kentucky avenue. 

The brothers, William Watson Woollen, 
Greenly V. Woollen and ^Milton A. Woollen, 
each of whom has taken an active part in the 
civic affairs of Indianapolis, are grandsons 
.of Leonard Woollen. 

Joshua Black, of Dutch descent, was born 
October 3, 1788, near Ellicott's Mills, in 
]Marj'land, and died December 4, 1879. in In- 
dianapolis. His father, Christopher Black, 
was a Revolutionary soldier. His loyalty to 



HISTOKY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



his countrj' was such that he enlisted in the 
War of 1812 and became a lieutenant by pro- 
motion from the ranks. He enlisted as a 
llome-fruard in the Civil War and would 
have enlisted as a soldier but for his ad- 
vanced af;e. He married Elizabeth Buro:ess 
February 21, 1811, and by this union four 
children were born. He moved from ]\Iary- 
land by way of the old National road to In- 
dianapolis in 1826, and located at the south- 
Avest corner of Illinois and Ohio streets. He 
was a fine carpenter and cabinet maker, and 
as such worked on many of the best public 
bnildin{:s in this city, ineludinjr the first State 
Capitol built in it, Asbury Chapel, now 
^Feridian Street Church, Roberts Chapel, 
now Roberts Park Church, and Ames 
Chapel, long since abandoned *and torn down. 
In 1841, 1842 and 1843 he was councilman 
from the First ward in this city. Originally 
he was a Whig: but he became a Republican 
when that party was orsranized. He was a 
]\[ethodist and prominent in the early his- 
tory of that church in this city. 

^lii.TON Asbury Wooi.t.en. The career of 
^Filtori Asbury AVoollen, president of the 
American Central Life Insurance Company, 
of Indianapolis, has been marked by consecu- 
tive endeavor and definite results. He is one 
of the es.sential]y representative men of the 
Indiana capital and is one who has been loyal 
to all of the interests of the city. So it is but 
consistent that he be here accorded recogni- 
tion among other of the leading citizens of 
"CJreater Indianapolis". 

^Ir. Woollen is a native of Indiana, hav- 
ing been born on a fai'iii in Lawrence Town- 
ship. Marion County. January 18, 1850. He 
is a son of ]\rilton and Sarah Black Wool- 
len, the fonner of whom was born in Ken- 
tucky and the latter in Maryland. ;Milton 
AYoollen came to Indianapolis in the pioneer 
period of its history and for a number of 
years was engaged at his trade, that of black- 
smith, and having received a serious injury 
while thus engaged, he quit that occupation 
atul removed to a farm in Lawrence Town- 
ship, about eight miles northeast of the cen- 
ter of the City of Indianapolis. He never 
fully recovered from the injury thus re- 
ceived. In 18fil he resumed his residence in 
the capital city and continued to reside there 
until his death, which occurred in 1868. He 
was a man of sterling integrity and strong 
mentality and as such maintained a secure 
place in connection with the practical busi- 
ness activities and civic affaii-s of Indianap- 
olis and was one of. its honored citizens. His 
wife .survived him by a nnmbei- of vears and 



of their ten children, three sons and three 
daughters are now living. 

^filton Asbury Woollen was reared to ma- 
turity in Indianapolis and was educated in 
its public schools. He began his business ca- 
reer at the age of fourteen years, when he 
was accorded the trusted place of special 
luessenger of the Western LTnion Telegraph 
Company, in whose service he continued about 
two years. He then completed a special com- 
mercial course in a: local business college and 
this training secured him employment as 
bookkeeper in the local offices of the Singer 
Sewing JMachine Company, which position he 
retained for two years. In 1868 he com- 
menced busines.s as a feed and grain mer- 
chant. The beginning of his operations was 
on a modest scale but by giving his personal 
attention to the administration of his affairs, 
he .soon succeeded in building up a prosper- 
ous trade and one that eventually attained 
large proportions. He continued in this busi- 
ness until 1893, when he became one of the 
interested principals in an extensive whole- 
sale produce commission concern, with which 
he continued to be actively identified as vice- 
president until March of 1902. He then dis- 
posed of his interest in the business and pur- 
chased a large amount of the stock of the 
American Central Life Insurance Company 
of Indianapolis, of which he became secre- 
tarj'. Pie retained this position until Janu- 
ary 4, 1905, when he was elected president of 
the company. In this chief administrative 
office he has since continued and to his able 
and con.servative executive policy and his 
careful supervision of the manifold details of 
the great enterprise has been in a large meas- 
ure achieved the splendid progress and dis- 
tinctive success of this company. It now con- 
trols a business of large scope and import- 
ance and is kno^ATi as one of the well ordered 
life insurance institutions of the country. 

In politics Mr. Woollen, though never am- 
bitious for public office of any kind, is a 
stanch supporter of the principles and poli- 
cies of the Republican party. He has been 
and is identified with various civic organiza- 
tions of a representative character, includ- 
ing the Board of Trade, of which he was 
president in 1908. the Commercial Club, Co- 
lumbia Club, IMarion Club, and several char- 
itable organizations. In the time-honoreil 
Ma.sonic fraternity he has attained to the 
thirty-second degree of the Ancient Accept- 
ed Scottish Rite. Both he and his wife are 
active meinl>ers of the First Baptist Church 
of Indianapolis. 

January 7. 1878. INTr. Woollen was married 
1o ]\Iiss Ida Baird. who was born in Cincin- 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



nati, Ohio, and reared in Indianapolis, anfl 
who was the daughter of the late William 
Baird. Mr. and Mrs. Woollen became the 
parents of one son, Herbert Milton Woollen, 
and two daughters, Ehna Woollen Dark, now 
deceased, and Orin Woollen Smith. The son 
is now secretary of the American Central 
Life Insurance Company. 

Hon. John Worth Kern, whose name has 
been well known throughout the United States 
since the presidential election of 1908, when 
he was the Democratic nominee for the office 
of vice-president, is well known in the vicin- 
ity of Indianapolis, having distinguished him- 
self in the profession of law. He was bora 
December 20, 1849, in Howard County, In- 
diana, son of Jacob H. Kern. His grandfa- 
ther, Jacob Kern, was born July 4, 1777, and 
was a native of Kernstown, Frederick Coun- 
ty, Virginia, and was of German extraction. 
The great-grandfather was Adam Kern, who 
emigrated to America from Germany, in 1750, 
in company with his two brothers. The 
brothers settled in Pennsylvania, but Adam 
Kern, the founder of Kernstown, Virginia, 
settled in that place. Jacob Kern, his son, 
settled in Shelby County, Indiana, in 1836, 
and there followed his trade of blacksmith; 
he had several children, among whom was 
Jacob H. 

Jacob H. Kern was born in Virginia, in 
1813, and became a physician ; he came to 
Shelbj' County, Indiana, at the same time as 
his father, but nine years later removed to 
Howard County, a former Indian Reserva- 
tion, which was opened up to settlement by 
whites about that time. Dr. Kern returned to 
his native state in 1871, and until the time 
of his death, in April, 1900, lived near Dale- 
ville, Botetourt County. 

In political views he was a Democrat. In 
his habits he was an example of temperance, 
sincerity and probity. Dr. Kern was married 
first to Nancy Liggett, who was born in Ohio, 
a daughter of George Liggett, of Indiana, but 
formerly of Ohio and a native of Virginia. 
Mr. Liggett, who was the father of twelve 
children, was a miller by occupation, and died 
in Shelby County, Indiana, when about sev- 
enty-five years old. Dr. Kern's children were 
Sarah E. (Mrs. Isaac Engel, of Daleville, 
Virginia) and John Worth. Mrs. Kern died 
in 1859, and in 1860 Dr. Kern married as his 
second wife Sarah Engel, who died soon after 
his decease. 

John W. Kem attended the public school 
at Alto in his native county, later attended 
the State Normal School at Kokomo, and was 
araduated from the law department of the 
University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, in 



1869. He began the practice of his profession 
in Kokomo, and in January, 1885, took the 
office of reporter for the Supreme Court. At 
this time he moved to Indianapolis, which 
has since been his place of residence. In 1892 
he was elected to the state Senate, of which 
body he was a member four years. He has 
held several other public offices; he was for 
two terms city attorney of Indianapolis, seven 
years city attorney of Kokomo, in 1893 was 
appointed by Attorney-General Olney to serve 
as special United States attorney for the pros- 
ecution of the wreckers of Indianapolis banks, 
and in 1900 and in 1904 was the Democratic 
candidate for governor of Indiana. Mr. Kern 
is one of the foremost Democrats of his native 
state, and a leader in all the party's move- 
ments, and, as before mentioned, gained the 
attention of the entire nation in 1908, in con- 
nection with his candidacy for vice-president. 
He has the confidence and respect of all with 
whom he comes 'in contact, and has a host of 
friends. 

Fraternally Mr. Kern is a member of Mys- 
tic Tie Lodge No. 398, Ancient Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons, of Indianapolis, Indianapolis 
Consistory, Scotti.sh Rite Masons, Star Lodge 
No. 7, Knights of Pythias, and to Indianap- 
olis Lodge No. 13; Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks. He belongs to the Commercial 
Club of Indianapolis, of which he served as 
president in 1904, and also belongs to the 
University, Country and Century Clubs, and 
the Indiana Democratic Club, having been the 
first president of the last-named organiza- 
tion. 

Mr. Kern married November 10, 1870, Julia 
Anna, daughter of David Hazzard. She died 
September 1, 1884, 'at the age of thirty-four 
years, leaving two children, Fred Richmond 
and Julia Anna. The son died February 26, 
1901, at Washington, District of. Columbia, 
having served with distinction in the service 
of his country in the Spanish- American War ; 
he was the only private volunteer from In- 
diana to take part in the battle of Santiago. 
He belonged to the First District of Columbia 
Volunteers. The daughter was graduated 
from Mrs. Sewall's Girls' Classical School, at 
Indianapolis in the class of 1901. Mr. Kern 
married again December 23, 1885, his second 
wife being Araminta A., daughter of Dr. 
William and Eliza (Newcomb) Cooper, of Ko- 
komo. Mr. and Mrs. Kern have become par- 
ents of two sons, John W., Jr., and William 
Cooper, and the family home is at 1836 North 
Pennsylvania street. 

WiLMER Christian, M. D. It has been 
given Dr. Christian to attain to marked suc- 
cess and prestige as one of the representative 



784 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



physicians and siirjieons of his native city, 
and he is now enuasred in the active practice 
of his profession in Indianapolis, where his 
popularity is of the most nneqnivocal type. 

Dr. Christian was born in Indianapolis, on 
the 24th of February, 1871, and is a son of 
AViliner F. and JIargaret J. (Moore) Chris- 
tian, the former of whom was born at Snow 
Hill, Maryland, and the latter in JIarion 
(Uiunty, Indiana. The father was reared and 
educated in his native state and has been for 
many years a successful contractor and build- 
er in Indianapolis, where he still maintains 
hi.s home. He is a son of Job Christian, 
who came from England to America and first 
.settled in New Jersey, whence he subsequent- 
ly removed to Maryland, where he passed 
the residue of his life, having* been a tailor 
by trade and vocation. ;Mrs. ^Margaret J. 
(Moore) Christian, who died in Indianapolis, 
on the 25th of January, 1904, was a daugh- 
ter of Thomas IMoore, who was one of the 
sterling pioneers of Marion County, Indiana, 
and who was a son of Thomas Moore, who 
innnigrated to the United States from County 
Donegal, Ireland, settling in Pennsylvania, 
where Thomas, Jr.. was born. The father and 
sons all assisted in the construction of the 
old National Road, and, following the prog- 
ress of this once important highway, they 
came west to Indiana, wliere the grandfather 
of the doctor secured a tract of land lying 
between Indianapolis and its attractive sub- 
urb of Irvington. l\Iuch of this land, which 
is now very valuable, is yet in the possession 
of the family. Wilmer F. and ^Margaret J. 
(]\Ioore) Christian became the parents of six 
children, of whom the eldest is Thomas J., 
who is a resident of Indianapolis, where ho 
is engaged in the lumber business; Wilmer, 
subject of this review, was the next in order 
of birth; Harry E. died on the 1st of April, 
1909; Frank L." died May 1, 1907: Grace, who 
remains at the paternal home, was graduated 
in Smith College, as a member of the class of 
1908; and Clara died on the 4th of January, 
1880. 

Dr. Christian gained his preliminary edu- 
cation in public school No. 1, Indianapolis, 
and later continued his studies in the classical 
school for boys and the Shortridge high 
school, in which latter he was graduated as a 
member of the class of 1888. He then entered 
Wabash College, at Crawfordsville, Indiana, 
in which he was graduated as a member of 
the class of 1892 and from which he received 
the degree of Bachelor of Science. In 1898 
he received from his alma mater the degree 
nf Master of Science, and in 190.5. that of 
blaster of Arts. After the completion of his 



more purely academic studies. Dr. Christian 
turned his attention to those of a technical 
nature, being matriculated in Medical Col- 
lege of Indiana, in Indianapolis, where he 
completed the prescribed course and was 
graduated in 1896, with the degree of Doctor 
of Medicine. He has since done effective 
post-graduate work and keeps fully in touch 
with the advances made in both departments 
of his exacting profession. In 1896 he was 
house physician of. the Indianapolis City 
Hospital, and he was police surgeon of the 
city from 1897 until 1901. He is now a mem- 
ber of the board of trustees of the Indiana 
Village for Epileptics, having been appointed 
to this position by Governor Marshall, in 
March, 1909. He is identified with the Amer- 
ican Medical Association and the Indiana 
State Medical Society. On January 15, 1910, 
Dr. Christian became vice-president and med- 
ical director of the Anchor Life Insurance 
Company of Indianapolis. In politics he is 
arrayed as a stanch supporter of the cause of 
the Democratic party, and he and his wife are 
ilevoted and zealous members of the First 
Presbyterian Church of Indianapolis, in 
which he has been a deacon since he was six- 
teen years of age. 

From 1886 to 1894 Dr. Christian was a 
member of the Indianapolis Light Artillery, 
and from the latter year until 1898 he served 
as adjutant in Second Regiment, Indiana Na- 
tional Guard. In the time-honored Masonic 
fraternity his affiliations are with Pentalpha 
Lodge No. 564, Free and Accepted Masons, 
Keystone Chapter No. 6, Royal Arch Masons, 
of which he was high priest in 1903-4; Raper 
Commandery No. 1, Knights Templar; and 
Indiana Consistory, Ancient Accepted Scot- 
tish Rite. He is also identified with Indian- 
apolis Lodge No. 56, Knights of Pythias, of 
which he is past chancellor commander, and 
he holds membership in the Board of Trade, 
the Indianapolis Art Association, the Con- 
temporary Club and the University Club. He 
has been a member of the board of trustees 
of his alma mater. Wabash College, since 
1905, and since 1900 has been national treas- 
urer of the college fraternity of Phi Gamma 
Delta. 

On the 29th of April, 1897. was solemnized 
the marriage of Dr. Christian to Miss Edna 
McGilliard, who was born and reared in In- 
dianapolis, being a daughter of Martin V. 
and Elizabeth (Lloyd) McGilliard, who still 
reside in this city, where her father is en- 
gaged in the insurance business. 

Osc.\R Hadi.kv. In the enlisting of men of 
notable enterprise, ability and integrity in 
the furtherance of its industrial, commercial 




d^^^ /J^, 



HISTORY OF GKEATER INDMNAPOLIS. 



785 



and civic affairs is mainly due the. precedence 
and great material prosperity of the fine old 
Hoosier commonwealth, and in this connec- 
tion it is pleasing to note the large propor- 
tion of native sons of the state who are here 
prominent and influential in business, pro- 
fessional and public life, upholding the high 
prestige of names long identified with the 
history of the state and wielding much in- 
fluence in their respective fields of endeavor. 
Oscar Hadley, the present eflicient and hon- 
ored state treasurer of Indiana, has passed 
his entire life thus far within the confines of 
the state and is a scion of one of its well 
known and sterling pioneer families. He has 
from his youth been closely identified with 
the great basic industries of agriculture and 
stock-growing, in connection with which he 
has attained to marked success, and the 
esteem and confidence in which he is held 
needs no further voucher than the fact that 
he is incumbent, for a second term, of one 
of the most important offices in the gift of 
the people of his native state. 

Mr. Hadley was born on a farm in Guil- 
ford Township, near the thriving little city 
of Plainfield, Hendricks County, Indiana, on 
the 3rd of May, 1858, and in order of nativ- 
ity is the fifteenth of the sixteen children 
born to Elias and Lucinda (Carter) Hadley, 
the former of whom was born in North .Caro- 
lina and the latter in Butler County, Ohio. 
Elias Hadley was a boy at the time when his 
father, Jeremiah Hadleyy removed with his 
family from North Carolina to Butler 
County, Ohio, where he was reared to ma- 
turity and received the limited educational 
advantages offered, by the primitive schools 
of the pioneer days. Prior to the attaining 
of his legal majority Elias Hadley came to 
Indiana and selected a favorable location in 
Hendricks County, after which he returned 
to Ohio and was united in marriage to Miss 
Lucinda Carter, who was then in her seven- 
teenth year. Immediately after their mar- 
riage the young couple came to Hendricks 
County, Indiana, and set up their Lares and 
Penates in a pioneer log house erected on the 
land, in Guilford Towaiship, which he had 
secured from the government and which rep- 
resented at the time a veritable forest wilder- 
ness. His father also removed to the same 
locality at the same time and both secured 
tracts of government land, on a portion of 
which the town of Plainfield is now located. 
The young man and the old grappled vigor- 
ously with the giants of the forest and in 
due time reclaimed their farms to cultiva- 
tion. Jeremiah Hadley and his worthy wife 
passed the residue of their lives in Hendricks 



County, and on their old homestead Elias and 
Lucinda (Carter) Ha.dley continued to reside 
until they, too, were summoned to the life 
eternal, honored pioneers of the county in 
which they took up their abode about the 
year 1822. Elias Hadley was seventy-five 
years of age at the time of his demise, and 
his cherished and devoted wife passed away 
at the venerable age of eighty-four years, a 
true mother in Israel, whose children may 
well "rise up and call her blessed", and 
whose memory they hold in lasting reverence. 
Both she and her husband were zealous mem- 
bers of the Christian church and in politics 
he was originally a Whig, and later a Re- 
publican, having united with the "grand old 
party" at the time of its organization. Of 
the sixteen children nine are now living. 
The Hadley family has been one of the best 
Imown and most highly honored in Hendricks 
County for many years, and its members have 
contributed in liberal measure to the civic 
and industrial development of that favored 
•section of the state. Twelve of the sixteen 
children in the Hadley family lived to ma- 
turity and all were members of the same 
church. All had married and on Christmas, 
1883, the entire family sat at dinner to- 
gether in the home of their parents. 

Oscar Hadley was reared to maturity on 
the old homestead farm which was the place 
of his nativity, and he received his due quota 
of the generous benefices that ever come to 
those who are thus given the privilege of 
closely touching gracious nature "in her visi- 
ble forms", the while he waxed strong in 
mind and body under the discipline involved, 
learning the lessons of industry, self-reliance 
and sturdy integrity that have proved so 
potent in the guiding and guarding of his 
career as a man among men, and have gained 
to him unequivocal confidence acd esteem. 
After completing the curriculum of the pub- 
lic schools Mr. Hadley continued his studies 
for one year in Butler College, at Irvington, 
a suburb of Indianapolis, and his entire busi- 
ness career, from his youth to the present 
time, has been one of intimate and successful 
identification with general farming and stock- 
growing, in which latter department of in- 
dustry he has gained a specially wide repu- 
tation as a successful breeder of high-grade 
cattle. For many years he has been num- 
bered among the representative farmers and 
stock-raisers of his native county, where he 
owns a fine landed estate of 250 acres, 
equipped with the best of improvements in 
all lines, and he now holds prestige as one 
of the leading exponents of agriculture and 
stock enterprises in the entire state. For 



HISTORY OP GBEATEB INDIANAPOLIS. 



several years past he has been a valued mem- 
ber of the Indiana state board of agriculture, 
of which he served as president in 1909, 
giving to the work of the organization the 
benefits of his wide and practical experience 
and fine administrative ability. In 1902 Mr. 
Hadley became one of the organizers and in- 
corporators of the Polled Durham Breeders' 
Association of the United. States, which is 
now the largest and most substantial organi- 
zation of its kind in the world, and of which 
he was elected president in 1908, and is still 
in office. In this connection it is needless 
to say that he has made a specialty of the 
breeding of the Polled Durham cattle, and 
on his farm are to be found the finest of 
specimens of this breed of the highest stand- 
ard. He is a member of both tlie State and 
National Shorthorn Breeders' Association. 

A man of original thought and strong in- 
tellectual equipment, Mr. Hadley has natur- 
ally taken a loyal interest in public affairs 
in his native state and done all in his power 
to conserve its progress and prosperity. A 
stalwart in the camp of the Republican party 
from the time of attaining to his legal ma- 
jority, he has rendered most efficient service 
in the promotion of its cause and has been a 
prominent factor in connection with the 
party work in Indiana. His eligibility for 
positions of public trust was early recognized 
in his home community, where, it may be 
said, he sets at naught all incidental applica- 
tion of the scriptural adage that "a prophet 
is not without honor save in his own coun- 
try". At the age of twenty-one years he be- 
came a member of the precinct committee of 
his party in his home precinct, and he was 
chairman of the precinct committee for a 
continuous period of fifteen years. The first 
elective office to which he was called was that 
of trustee of his native township, of which 
position he continued incumbent for five and 
•one-half years, at the close of which, in 1900, 
he was nominated and elected treasurer of 
Hendricks County. Local political precedent 
prescribes that in that county the county 
treasurer shall not become a candidate for a 
second term, and thus Mr. Hadley served 
only the one term, within which he /showed 
marked ability in handling the fiscal affairs 
of the county, as has he later in the adminis- 
tration of those of the entire state. 

In 1906 Mr. Hadley 's name was placed be- 
fore his party in connection with candidacy 
for the office of state treasurer, and after a 
spirited preliminary campaign he was duly 
nominated for this office in the Republican 
state convention of that year. In November 
of the same year he rolled up a gratifying 



majority at the polls, and on the 10th of 
February, 1907, he assumed the practical 
charge of the duties of the office. Within 
his term of two years he amply justified the 
wisdom of the people's choice, bringing to 
bear marked capacity for handling the de- 
tails of the work and doing much to improve 
the system of handling the fiscal affairs of 
the state. Popular appreciation of his fidel- 
ity, pbility and sterling integrity of purpose 
was indicated both in- his nomination as his 
own successor by his party in the state con- 
vention of 1908, and also by the unequivocal 
support accorded him in the ensuing election, 
through which he was returned to office for a 
second term of two years, which will expire 
on the 10th of February, 1911. His record 
as state treasurer has been signally clean, 
straightforward and successful, redounding 
alike to his credit and to the conservation of. 
the best interests of the commonwealth. His 
administration will go on record as one of 
the best the office has ever had. 

Mr. Hadley is an appreciative member of 
the Masonic fraternity, in which he has taken 
the capitular degrees, being affiliated with 
Plainfield Lodge No. 653, Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons, in Plainfield, and with Dan- 
ville Chapter No. 46, Royal Arch Masons, of 
Danville, Indiana. He also holds member- 
ship . in the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows and the Knights of Pythias. In 1879 
Mr. Hadley was united in marriage with 
Miss Emma Talbott and three children were 
born of this union. 

Gavin L. Payne. Exercising important 
functions and to be noted as one of the rep- 
resentative finaincial concerns in the Indiana 
capital, the firm of Gavm L. Payne & Com- 
pany controls a large and substantial business 
in the handling of high-grajie securities and 
in conducting an investment-banking enter- 
prise. The business is held to normal and 
conservative lines and its absolute reliability 
has gained to the firm distinctive prestige in 
financial circles. As the executive head of 
this well known concern and as one of the 
loyal and progressive citizens of "Greater In- 
dianapolis," Mr. Payne is well entitled to 
representation in this publication. 

Gavin Lodge Pa^Tie has lived in Indianap- 
olis virtually all of his life, having been an 
infant at the time of his parents' removal to 
the capital city from Jefferson County, which 
has contributed a Harge and valued quota to 
the citizenship of Indianapolis. He is a son 
of John Godman Payne, now deceased, and 
Mary (Byfield) Payne. Gavin L. Payne was 
born at Wirt, Jefferson County, Indiana, on 
the 3rd of September, 1869, and his early 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



787 



educational discipline was received in the 
public schools of Indianapolis. He was af- 
forded the advantages of the old high school, 
now supplemented by a large and modern 
building, at the corner of Pennsylvania and 
Michigan streets. Much of Mr. Payne's life 
has been passed in a newspaper atmosphere 
and as a youngster he made his way through 
high school by carrying newspaper routes 
early in the morning and late in the evening. 
Later he began contributing to the local 
weekly papers, and before he had attained the 
age of twenty years he Avas a full-fledged re- 
porter on the Indianapolis Sentinel. In 1890 
came the wanderlust period in his career and, 
tempted by the lure of high salaries then be- 
ing paid to newspaper men in the south, he 
went to Memphis, Tennessee, where he became 
attached to the new Memphis Commercial, on 
which he served during some stormy years in 
the local history of that city. He rose from 
the position of police reporter to that of man- 
aging editor, which latter incumbency he as- 
sumed at the age of twenty -three years. Dur- 
ing much of the time passed in Memphis, Mr. 
Pajme was the roommate and chum of James 
Keeley, who is now managing editor of the 
Chicago Tribune and to whom a recent east- 
ern magazine referred as the world's greatest 
news editor. "I think I was menaced by the 
southern hookworm about the time I met 
Keeley," said Mr. Payne recently, "but the 
newspaper pace set by that human dynamo, 
Keeley, quickly electrocuted anything of that 
kind in my system. I was never able to 
catch up with him, biit the advantage of his 
strenuous companionship meant much to me." 
Mr. Payne was closely associated in those days 
with the late Senator Edward Carmack, a 
brilliant editor whose tragic death, in Nash- 
ville is a matter of recent occurrence. A va- 
ried and interesting experience in his profes- 
sion at this time, including a season as a 
correspondent in the mountains of eastern 
Tennessee during the coal miners' war, which 
required the entire state militia and sheriffs' 
posses to quell. He also made a trip up the 
Mississippi River on the "Concord," the first 
modern fighting .ship to pass up the river as 
far as Memphis. When the New Orleans 
New Delta was established by the good people 
of the Crescent City to stamp out the famous 
lottery that had so long been an institution of 
that state, Mr. Payne was invited to join its 
editorial staff and he was assigned a part 
in that notable and successful campaign which 
was conducted by the redoubtable and fear- 
less Colonel John Parker. The Mafia troubles 
also came on at this time and in connection 
therewith, Mr. Payne did most effective 
Vol. 11—10 



reportorial work. When his loyal and valued 
friend, James Keeley, became managing edi- 
tor of the Louisville •Commercial he tendered 
the position of city editor to Mr. Payne, and 
the two were again roommates until Mr. 
Keeley went to the Chicago Tribune. 

In May, 1893, Mr. Payne was tendered the 
position of assistant city editor of the Indian- 
apolis Journal, and very shortly after his 
acceptance he was advanced to office of city 
editor, of which position he continued in ten- 
ure until 1899— probably the longest service 
at this particular post ever recorded in the 
history of that well beloved old paper. He ac- 
companied Ex-President Harrison around the 
state in 1894 and reported that statesman's 
famous utterances. During the Spanish- 
American War he was duly accredited as a 
correspondent by the war department and 
served the Indianapolis Journal at Chieka- 
mauga and Tampa, where he "covered" the 
Indiana regiments. When the Indianapolis 
Press was establfshed Mr. Payne became city 
editor of that publication, with which he re- 
mained until its demise. While on this paper 
he served as correspondent at Frankfort, Ken- 
tucky, in the troublesome days following Goe- 
bel's death, and incidentally he obtained the 
first interview with Governor Taylor, who 
was then entrenched in the state capitol. 

Upon the death of the Indianapolis Press. 
Mr. Payne waa elected secretary of the Se- 
curity 'Trust Company, which was then being 
organized, and was rapidly advanced until 
he became president of the institution, in 
which office he succeeded the late Americus 
C. Daily. In the winter of 1906, his health 
having become impaired, Mr. Payne sold his 
interest in the trust company, resigned the 
presidency of the same and went to the 
Island of Jamaica for a month's stay, and he 
was ill in bed in Kingston when the great 
earthquake of January 13, 1907, destroyed 
that city, but he fortunately escaped injury. 
On the day when the panic of 1907 had its 
initiation Mr. Payne, who had in the mean- 
while fully recuperated his physical energies^ 
established the investment concern that now 
bears his name. For years he has made, a 
study of investment-securities, and thus he i.s 
admirably fortified for the administration of 
the affairs of the firm of which he is thus the 
executive principal. 

Mr. Payne has held but one public office, 
having represented the Third ward of Indian- 
apolis in the city council for one term. He 
has also given effective service as a member 
of the citizens' advisory committee of the 
Indianapolis public library, and at one time 
he held the presidency of the Indianapolis 



HISTORY OF GREATEB INDIANAPOLIS. 



Press Club. He was vice-president of the In- 
diana May Music Festival Association at the 
time when that organization was at its zenith. 
Fond of water sports, he, with others, organ- 
ized the old Indianapolis Aquatic Club, of 
which he was the first president. In his 
younger days he contributed prose and verse 
to many of the magazines and other publica- 
tions. 

In politics Mr. Payne gives his allegiance 
to the Republican party, and in the Masonic 
fraternity he is affiliated with the various 
bodies of the Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite, 
the while his ancient-craft inembership is in 
the Mystic Tie Lodge No. 398, Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons. He is identified with the Co- 
lumbia Club, the ]\Iarion Club, the German 
House, the Indianapolis Maennerchor, and 
the Indianapolis Stock P^xchange. 

In 1904 Mr. Payne was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Bertha C. Fahnley, daughter of 
Frederick Fahnley, a representative business 
man of Indian;i polls, and the two childi'en of 
this union ai'e Frederick and Ada. 

Mr. Payne claiins to be a pure-bred Hoosier, 
as his grandpai'ents on both sides were num- 
bered among the vry early settlers of this 
state. His maternal grandfather, Horatio 
Byfield, was landed at Madison, Indiana, by 
a flatboat before Indiana was a state and 
north of that now thriving city he literally 
hewed out a farm in the midst of the forest 
wilds. His remains wnre laid to rest in the 
little cemetery on his nkl homestead farm. In 
1818 Horatio Byfield constructed a wooden 
plow for road-making, and this plow, which 
hung in the Indiana State Museum for many 
years, was proclaimed the first plow ever 
built for that purpose in Indiana. In the 
days prior to the Civil War Mr. Payne's pa- 
ternal grandfather. P'lihu Payne, was a man- 
ufacturer of fanning mills upon a somewhat 
extensive scale, at ^fadison. this state.. The 
Payne family had its first representatives 
from Baltiinore. ^Maryland, where it was 
founded in the colonial days. On the ma- 
ternal side the lineage is traced back to stanch 
Scotch and Irish stock. When but fourteen 
years of age John (1. Payne, father of the 
subject of this review, tendered his services 
in defense of the Union, by enlisting in the 
Thirteenth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and 
later he became a member of a Kentucky reg- 
iment. He saw his full quota of arduous serv- 
ice and was with Sherman on the ever memor- 
able march from Atlanta to the sea. 

GuSTAVUR B. J.\CK?ON, M. D., is one of the 
younger generation of physicians and sur- 
geons engaged in practice in the capital city 
of Indiana, where he stands as one of the rep- 



resentative members of his profession and 
where he has control of a large and import- 
ant practice, implying not only marked pro- 
fessional ability but also distinctive personal 
popularity. 

Dr. Gustavus Brown Jaclcson was born in 
Owensboro, Daviess County, on the 15th of 
October, 1877, and is a scion of old and hon- 
ored families of our American republic, where 
they were founded prior to the w-ar of the 
Revolution. Through his paternal grand- 
mother he is descended in direct line from 
Samuel Hawes, who was one of the committee 
of safety in Caroline County, Virginia, in the 
Revolutionary period and who held the ex- 
ecutive office of clerk of this committee, 
(^ne of his sons was a patriot soldier in the 
Continental line and served with distinction 
as colonel of his regiment. (American Ar- 
chives, page 103: Peter Force's Archives, 
page 974.) On the maternal side the doctor 
is a direct descendant of Hon. Robert Ridge- 
Iv, of ^Maryland, whose will was attested in 
1680; of Hon. John Dorsey, 1714; and of 
]\raior General John Hammond, who died in 
1713. (See "Griffith Genealogy," published 
by M. K. Boyle & Son, in 1892.) 

Dr. Jackson is a son of Christopher D. 
Jackson, Jr,, and Anna (Crow) Jackson, both 
natives of Kentuck-y. His father was a suc- 
cessful farmer and influential citizen of 
Daviess County, Kentucky, and was a Demo- 
crat in politics, and both he and his wife held 
membership in the Baptist Church. Dr. 
eJackson gained his preliminary education in 
the common schools of his native state, after 
which he continued his studies in the literary 
department of the historic old University of 
Virginia, at Charlottesville. For one year 
thereafter, from 1898 to 1899. he was a stu- 
dent in the medical department of the Uni- 
versity of Cincinnati, after which he was 
matriculated in Rush IMedical College, repre- 
senting the medical department of the Univer- 
sit.v of Chicago, in which he was a student for 
three years and in which he was graduated in 
June, 1902. with the well earned degree of 
Doctor of Medicine. After his graduation he 
became house surgeon of Michael Reese hospi- 
tal, one of the leading institutions of the kind 
in Chicago, and he held this position until 
1904. in the meanwhile gaining most valuable 
clinical experience. In 1904-5 he further for- 
tified himself for the work of his exacting 
profession b.v taking effective post-graduate 
studies in the medical department of Berlin 
University and other leading medical institu- 
tions in Germany. Upon his return to the 
Ignited States he took up his residence in In- 
dianapolis, where gratifying siiceess and pres- 



HISTORY OF GREATKR INDIANAPOLIS. 



t\ge have been his in the active work of his 
chosen profession. 

In politics Dr. Jackson gives his allegiance 
to the Democratic party, and he and his wife 
hold membership in the First Presbyterian 
Church of Indianapolis. He is affiliated with 
Oriental Lodge No. 500, Free and Accepted 
I\Iasons, with the Nu Sigma Nu medical col- 
lege fraternity, and is identified with the In- 
diana chapter of the Sons of the American 
Revolution. On the .30th of November, 1905, 
was solemnized the marriage of Dr. Jackson 
to iliss Lena Bentley, of Sj^racuse, New York, 
in which city she was born and reared, being 
a daughter of F. F. and Jeanette Bentley. 
Her father is deputy sheriff of his county and 
he still maintains the family home in Syra- 
cuse. Dr. and Mrs. Jackson have two chil- 
dren, Jeanette Alice, who was born on the 
8th of April, 1007, and Mildred Glover, born 
November 28, 1909. They enjoy marked 
popularity in the social life of the capital 
city and their home is a center of gracious 
but unpretentious hospitality. 

Judge Robert W. McBride, who is engaged 
in the active practice of his profession in 
Indianapolis, is recognized as one of the rep- 
resentative legists and jurists of the state, 
and his achievement affords the best voucher 
for his ability and his devotion to the work 
of his .chosen field of endeavor. He served 
for six yeai-s on the bench of the thirty-fifth 
judicial circuit of the state and for somewhat 
more than two years was a justice of the 
supreme court of Indiana. He is now en- 
gaged in practice alone, and his associate and 
individual clientage is of large and impor- 
tant order. He is also counsel for the loan 
department of the State Life Insurance Com- 
pany, of Indianapolis, in which city he has 
maintained his residence since 1893. 

Judge McBride claims the fine old Buckeye 
commonwealth as the place of his nativity, 
having been born in Richland County, Ohio, 
on the 25th of January, 1842, and being a 
son of Augustus and Martha A. (Barnes) 
McBride, the former of whom was bom in 
Washington County. Pennsylvania, and the 
latter in Richland County, Ohio, in which 
latter state their marriage was solemnized. 
The paternal grandfather of Judge McBride 
was born in Scotland and was a scion of 
stanch old stock in the land of hills and 
heather. The family was founded in America 
shortly after the close of the War of the 
Revolution, and the original settlement was 
made in Washington County, Pennsylvania. 
Augustus McBride was an infant at the time 
of his parents' removal from the old Ke.y- 
stone state to Ohio, where he was reared to 



maturity and where he* received such educa- 
tional advantaged as were afforded in the 
somewhat primitive schools of the pioneer 
epoch. He learned the trade of carpenter, 
to which he devoted his attention until the 
inception of the war with Mexico, when he 
tendered his services to his country, enlisting 
in an Ohio volunteer command and proceed- 
ing with Hie same to the scene of hostilities. 
While thus in service as a soldier he died, 
in the City of Mexico, in February, 1848, 
when only twenty-nine years of age. He was 
a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
as was also his wife, who survived him by 
many years. They became the parents of 
three sons and one daughter, and of the 
three now living Judge McBride is the eldest ; 
I\Iary J. is the widow of Robert S. McFar- 
land and resides at Lawrence, Kansas; and 
James N. is and has been for many years a 
justice of the, peace at Waterloo, Indiana. 
Mrs. McBride eventually contracted a second 
marriage, by which she became the wife of 
James Sirpless. She died on her homestead 
farm, five miles distant from the city of 
Mansfield, Richland County, Ohio, in 1896, 
and the place of her death being but a half 
mile distant from that of her birth. She 
was seventy-two years of age at the time of 
her demise and was one of the revered pio- 
neer women of Richland County. She sur-" 
vived her second husband also, and of their 
four children three are living, namely : Albert 
B., who resides at Lawrence, Kansas; Will- 
iam A., who is a representative farmer near 
Shiloh, Richland County, Ohio; and Nellie, 
who is the widow of John W. Beeler and a 
resident of Lawrence, Kansas. Mrs. Martha 
A. ("Barnes") McBride Sirpless was a daugh- 
ter of Wesley and Mary (Smith) Barnes, the 
former of whom was born in Virginia, in 
1794, of stanch English lineage. Mr. Barnes 
was one of the sterling pioneers of Richland 
County, Ohio, where he took up his residence 
in 1816 and where he reclaimed a farm from 
the wilderness. He there continued to main- 
tain his home for many years, but finally re- 
moved to Iowa, settling near Kirksville, where 
he died in 1862, at the age of sixty-eight 
years, having been likewise one of the pio- 
neers of that state. His remains rest in the 
cemetery at Kirksville. as do also those of 
his cherished and devoted wife, whose father 
was a patriot soldier in the W^ar of the Revo- 
lution. 

Judge Robert W. McBride was but six 
years of age at the time of his father's death 
and he continued to reside in his native 
count.v until he had attained the age of thir- 
teen years, when he accompanied an uncle 



190 



HISTOEY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



on his removal to the State of Iowa, where he 
was reared to manhood, in Mahaska County, 
where he availed himself of the advantages 
of the common schools and laid the founda- 
tion for the broad and liberal education 
which he has since secured through self-disci- 
pline, careful study and reading and active 
association with men and affairs. For three 
years he was a successful and popular teacher 
in the di.strict schools of Mahaska County, 
Iowa, and then, at the age of twenty years, he 
returned to Ohio, where he forthwith ten- 
dered his services in defense of the Union, 
whose integrity was then in jeopardy through 
the rebellion of the south. He enlisted in the 
Seventh Ohio Independent Squadron of 
Cavalry, in November, 1863, and he eventu- 
ally became a non-connnissioned officer in this 
command, which eventually became the body- 
guard of President Lincoln, serving as the 
mounted escort of the martyr president until 
his a.ssassination. Judge McBride received 
liis honorable discharge in September, 1865, 
and his continued interest in his old com- 
rades in arms is significantly shown by his 
membership in George H. Thomas Post No. 
17, Grand Army of the Republic, in Indian- 
apolis. He is a past post commander. 

After the war Judge McBride resumed the 
work of the pedagogic profession, teaching 
in the public schools of Ohio and Indiana 
and also prosecuting the study of law under 
effective preceptorship. In April, 1867, ho 
was admitted to the bar, at Auburn, DeKalb 
County, Indiana, where he initiated the 
active practice of his profession, in which he 
became associated with Judge James I. Best, 
under the firm name of Best & McBride. It 
may be noted that Judge Best is now one of 
the leading members of the bar of Minne- 
apolis, Minnesota, and that he was a member 
of the supreme court commission of Indiana 
during the entire period of its existence. The 
partnership alliance of the two young and 
ambitious attorneys continued for one year, 
after which Judge IMcBride conducted an in- 
dividual professional business for som* time. 
He finally entered into partnership with Jo- 
seph L. Morlan, and this association con- 
tinued until the death of the latter, in 1879. 
Thereafter Judge ^IcBride again conducted 
an individual practice until 1882, when he 
was elected to the bench of the thirty-fifth 
judicial circuit, comprising the counties of 
DeKalb, Noble and Steuben. He presided 
over this tribunal with distinctive ability and 
gained the unqualified approval of the bar 
of his district, as well as that of the general 
public. He brouglit to bear exact and com- 
prchcnsivi' knowledire of the iiiinutia^ of the 



science of jurisprudence, showed his familiar- 
ity with precedents, and through his wise 
decisions signally conserved ju.stice and 
equity. He has a distinctively judicial cast 
of mind, is not to be diverted from the main 
points at issue and thus his rulings on the 
bench, marked by fairness and impartiality, 
seldom met with reversal by the higher courts 
He continued on the circuit bench for a 
period of six years, and in 1890 he removed 
from Waterloo to Elkhart. In December of 
the same ye.ar he was appointed an associate 
judge of the supreme court of the state, to 
fill the vacancy caused by the death of Judge 
Joseph S. Mitchell. He made an admirable 
record of service on the supreme bench, from 
which he retired in January, 1893, at the 
expiration of the term for which he had been 
appointed. He then resumed the practice of 
his profession, and in April of the same year 
he formed a partnership with Caleb S. 
Denny, with whom he continued to be a.s.so- 
eiated in practice in Indianapolis until the 
1st of February, 1904. In the meanwhile 
William M. Aydelotte was admitted to the 
firm in 1900, and after his withdrawal ilr. 
Denny's son, George L., was admitted to 
partnership, under the firm name of ^Ic- 
Bride, Denny & Denny, which continued until 
February, 1904, since which time Judge ilc- 
Bride has been alone and has been counsel 
for the loan department of the State Life In- 
surance Company. Judge McBride is known 
as a resourceful and versatile trial lawyer and 
as a counselor his ability has drawn to him 
a very large and important clientage, so that 
he has gained no little precedence as a cor- 
poration lawyer. He has served as counsel 
of the loan department of the State Life In- 
surance Company since 1904 and this position 
demands no small part of his time and atten- 
tion. 

In politics Judge IMcBride accords an un- 
wavering allegiance to the cause of the Re- 
publican party, and both he and his wife are 
zealous members of the Central Avenue Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church. In the ^lasonic 
fraternity the affiliations of Judge McBride 
are here briefly noted: Pentalpha Lodge, 
Free and Accepted Masons; Keystone Chap- 
ter, Royal Arch Masons; Raper Command- 
ery. Knights Templar; Consistory of the 
Valley of Indianapolis, Ancient Accepted 
Scottish Rite, in which- he has attained to 
the thirty-second degree ; and Murat Temple. 
Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles of the 
]\rystic Shrine. He is past eminent com- 
mander of Apollo Commandery No. 19. 
Knights Templar, of Kendallville, Indiana. 
He is identified with Indianapolis Lodge No 



IIISTOllY OF GREATER INlDTANAPOLIS. 



791 



■465, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, at 
Indianapolis, and has represented the same 
as a member of the grand lodge of the state. 
He is also affiliated with Star Lodge No. 7, 
Knights of Pythias, of Indianapolis, and has 
likewise been a member of the Indiana grand 
lodge of this popular fraternal order. He is 
a member of Columbia, Univereity, ]\Iarion 
County and Century clubs. Judge McBride 
was a member of the Indiana National Guard 
from 1879 to 1893, having been made captain 
of his company at the time of its organiza- 
tion and the same having finally become 
Company A of the Third Regiment. He was 
the first to hold the rank of lieutenant colonel 
of this regiment and was afterward its 
colonel, an office which he resigned in Janu- 
ary, 1891, after his elevation to the bench of 
the supreme court. 

On the 27th of September, 1868, was sol- 
emnized the marriage of Judge McBride to 
Miss Ida S. Chamberlain, who was born and 
reared in Indiana and who is a daughter of 
Dr. James N. and Catherine (Brink) Cham- 
berlain, who passed the closing years of their 
lives in DeKalb County, this state. Dr. 
Chamberlain was a graduate of the Western 
Reserve College of Physicians and Surgeons, 
in the city of Cleveland, Ohio, and became 
one of the inost distingruished representatives 
of his profession in the State of Indiana. In 
conclusion is entered brief record concerning 
the four children of Judge and Mrs. McBride. 
Daisy I. became the wife of Frederick C. 
Starr, and the two children of this union are 
Kathryn M. and Robert McBride Starr. She 
is now the wife of Kent A. Cooper, of In- 
dianapolis, by whom she has a daug:hter, 
Jane. Charles H. McBride, who is employed 
in Springfield. Illinois, married Miss Minnie 
Cohu, who died a few months later. Herbert 
W. McBride, who now resides at the parental 
liome and is employed by the Du Pont Pow- 
der Co., was identified with mining enter- 
prises in British Columbia for a period of 
about two years. Martha Catherine is the 
wife of James P. Hester, of Indianapolis, 
and they have two children, George McBride 
and James Perry, Jr. 

James M.\rtindai,e McIntosh is widely 
known in Indianapolis and throughout the 
State of Indiana as a successful laAvyer, bank- 
er and an influential representative of the Re- 
publican party. He was born at Connersville, 
Indiana, November 14. 1858, and is. a son of 
the eminent James C. Mcintosh, an attorney 
whose fame spread throughout southeastern 
Indiana, a man of the highest standing in the 
councils of the Methodist Church and a trus- 
tee of Asburv Universitv (now DePauw). He 



was twice a delegate to the general conference 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

At Asbury University James M. Mcintosh 
received his education, and he began life as 
a clerk in the Citizens' Bank at Connersville. 
In 1882 he entered upon the practice of the 
law in that city, and was very successful in 
his chosen work there for ten years or until 
he was chosen the cashier of the First Na- 
tional Bank of Connersville in 1892, resuming 
again the practice of the law in 1895. Dur- 
ing his residence in Connersville he was also 
a stockholder in various manufacturing con- 
cerns. Mr. Mcintosh early in life began to 
take an active interest in the success of the 
Republican party, and served as chairman of 
the Fayette County Central Committee for 
twelve or thirteen years, while in 1886 he 
was elected the mayor of the City of Con- 
nersville, and at the close of that term in 
1890 was made clerk of the Fayette Circuit 
Court. Following his termination in that 
office in 1894 he was elected in the same year 
joint representative in the legislature, where 
he made a splendid record, and during his 
one term in that body made himself one of 
the most influential young Republicans of In- 
diana. He was an efficient member of the 
ways and means committee that placed the 
finances of the state upon a sound business 
basis and reduced the commonwealth's expen- 
ditures to less than its income. To Mr. Mc- 
intosh also beloVigs the honor of pushing 
through the legislature the bill placing the 
educational institutions of Indiana upon an 
independent basis and providing for them an 
ample income without the necessity of lobby- 
ing in every legislature. In 1899 he was ap- 
pointed national bank examiner for Indiana 
and later was assigned work as special exam- 
iner for the department of justice. He re- 
signed this position in 1907 to accept the 
presidency of the Union National Bank which 
position he is now filling. He has won many 
friends in his professional and public life, 
and is a member of the jMasonie fraternity, 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, 
Knights of Pythias and the Delta Kappa 
Epsilon, and of various clubs in the city. 

He married Miss Anna L. Pepper at Con- 
nersville in 1890, and they have four children, 
Mary E., Jessie C, Dorothy J. and James P. 

Theodore C. Steele. There is a distinc- 
tive correlation in all fonns of art expres- 
sion, including painting, sculpture, music and 
poesy, and each claims its own devotees and 
appreciative as well as creative talent. The 
"Greater Indianapolis" has no reason to 
deny claim to precedence as' an art center, 
for painting, music and literature here re- 



f92 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



ceive clue recognition, anil among the- siiccess- 
ful and able representatives of the first ele- 
ment in this list is found Theodore C. Steele, 
whose talent as a landscape and portrait 
artist rests secure in the many evidences given 
thereof in the products of his brush. In his 
chosen field he well merits consideration as 
one of the leading artists of the country and 
as one who has thus conferred a meed of 
honor upon his native state. 

Theodore C. Steele was born in Owen 
County, Indiana, on the 11th of September, 
1847, and is a son of Samuel H. and Harriet 
X. (Evans) Steele, both of whom were like- 
wise born and reared in Indiana, where the 
respective families were founded in the early 
pioneer epoch. The paternal grandfather, 
James Steele, was of Scotch-Irish lineage and 
was a native of Kentucky, whei»e he devoted 
his attention to the great basic industry of 
agriculture until his removal to Indiana, 
where he became a pioneer, even as had his 
father in Kentucky, whither the latter re- 
moved from Virginia, with whose annals the 
name became identified in the early colonial 
era of our national history. James Steele 
married Anna Johnson, and they became the 
parents of eleven children. Samuel H. Steele 
was born in Owen Count.y. Indiana, where he 
was reared to manhood and received such ad- 
vantages as were afforded in the pioneer 
schools. There he followed the trade of 
saddler for a number of years and later he 
engaged in the general merchandise business. 
In 1852 he removed to Montgomery County 
and established a general store at Waveland, 
where he died in 1862, at the age of thirty- 
seven years. He was a member of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church and his wife held 
membership in the Presbyterian Church. She 
long survived him, passing the closing years 
of her life in the City of Portland, Oregon, 
where she died in 1908, at the venerable age 
of eighty-seven years. Of the five children 
Theodore C. was the first born ; Charles A. is 
a resident of "Wichita, Kansas; William J. 
resides in Jefferson, Oregon : Samuel N. main- 
tains his home at Portland, Oregon ; and Alice 
II. resides in Nevada. 

Jesse Evans, father of Mrs. Harriet N. 
(Evans) Steele, came to Indiana from Ten- 
nessee and was one of the first settlers of 
Owen County, this state. He w^as a soldier 
in the Blaekhawk Indian War and was a 
citizen of sterling worth of character, having 
no little influence in public affairs in the 
pioneer community, where he reared his 
family of seven children. The Evans family 
is of Welsh origin and was early founded in 
North Carolina. 



A lecent article relative to the career of 
the well known Indianapolis artist contained 
the following pertinent statements, and the 
same are worthy of reproduction: "In trac- 
ing the life history of .Mr. Steele we find no 
indication of the source of the arti.stic t-alents 
which have made his name known all through 
his native .state. Good, worthy farming peo- 
ple, his ancestors possessed the courage and 
enterprise of pioneers, living useful, exem- 
plary lives and dying respected by all who 
knew them, but not showing that unmistak- 
able talent that differentiates the art lover 
from the simple tiller of the soil." It may- 
well be said that artists, like poets, are born, 
not made. Mr. Steele was reared in the vil- 
lage of Waveland, ^Montgomery Count3% 
where his educational advantages were those 
afforded in the village school. His talent 
was inborn and found due expression when 
he was but a child, his success in painting 
portraits without instructions having been re- 
garded as one of the wonders of his little 
home town. He pursued his art study and 
work with unremitting love and zeal and in 
later years was able to secure the advantage 
of foreign studies, having passed the interval 
between 1880 and 1885 under the instruction 
of the best mastei-s of the Royal Academy in 
the City of Munich. Since his return to his 
native land his interests have centered in In- 
dianapolis, where he has been unflagging in 
his efforts to foster the cause of art and to 
build up an art institute creditable to the 
city and state, especially in the exploitation 
of the work of Indiana artists. For a number 
of 3'ears after his return from abroad ^Mr. 
Steele devoted much of his time to teaching 
art in Indianapolis, but for the past several 
years he has noly found it expedient to carry, 
forward this work, as he has been able to 
accomplish more in other directions. He is a 
member of the board of directors of the In- 
dianapolis Art Association, whose principal 
and definite object is to secure the founding 
of a great and representative art institution 
of permanent order in the fair capital city of 
the state. He has an individual place in the 
art history of his native state and, indeed, 
of his native country, though, with character- 
istic modesty, he would personally lay claim 
to no such pretension. He is a valued and 
appreciative member of the Society of West- 
ern Artists, of which he was president from 
1898 until 1900 and in whose affairs he main- 
tains a most insistent interest. Mr. Steele's 
city studio is located in the Security Trust 
building and in picturesque Brown County, 
Indiana, he now has a most attractive summer 
home and well equipped studio. In the 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



idyllic, pastoral scenery of that section of the 
state, whose hills and valleys have as yet 
been traversed by no i-ailroad and whose 
people are, in a sense, sequestered in an 
idyllic way from the "madding crowd's 
ignoble strife", he finds ample lure for his 
brush, having produced some of his choicest 
canvases from the restful scenes there de- 
picted. No one with less artistic apprecia- 
tion could thus transform the practical and 
prosaic into such charming conceptions as 
are his paintings of Brown County scenery. 
He now devotes the greater portion of the 
summer season to landscape work in south- 
ern Indiana, whose attractions never fail in 
appeal to his artistic sensibilities. Of his 
technique and definite skill as an artist it is 
not necessary to speak in this article, for his 
work and his reputation sufficiently denote 
his powers. 

Mr. Steele has painted five portraits of the 
late Gen. Benjamin Harrison, former presi- 
dent of the United States and distinguished 
and honored citizen of Indianapolis, which he 
himself described as "no mean city". One 
of these portraits of General Harrison was 
painted prior to his death and two of the 
number were painted for John Wanamaker, 
of Philadelphia, a great friend and admirer 
of General Harrison. Mr. Wanamaker pre- 
sented one of his two portraits to the Union 
League Club of Philadelphia and the other 
he has in his own home. Mr. Steele has ex- 
ecuted a portrait of Hon. Charles W. Fair- 
banks, former vice-president of the United 
States, for the Columbia Club of Indianapo- 
lis, and the University Club claims one of the 
portraits of General Harrison. He also 
painted a portrait of Senator Albert J. Bev- 
eridge for the Columbia Club of Indianapolis. 
Among his other noteworthy portraits may be 
mentioned those of several of the former 
presidents and of other members of the 
faculty of the University of Indiana, and 
those of five former governors of Indiana, 
which are in the state library. Governors 
Porter, Gray, Hovey, Chase and Matthews 
have thus been subjects of Mr. Steele's faith- 
ful and versatile brush, and his li.st of por- 
traits also includes those of many other dis- 
tinguished men of the state and nation. 

Mr. Steele served as a member of the jury 
that selected the work of American artists for 
exhibition at the Paris Exposition in 1900, 
said jury having made its selections in New 
York City. In 1902 he served on the jury 
to which was assigned the selection of paint- 
ings and other art works for the Carnegie In- 
stitute, in the City of Pittsburg, and he was 
a member of the jury of award in the art 



aepartnient at the Louisiana Purchase Expo- 
sition, in St. Louis, in 19U3. lie has found 
pleasure in securing a collection of the works 
of other artists, both in Europe and America. 

In politics Mr. Steele is an independent 
Republican and while he has never entei'cd 
the arena of practical politics nor public life 
he takes a deep interest in all that concerns 
the welfare of his home city, state and coun- 
try, and is essentially a loyal and progressive 
citizen. He is identified with various civic 
organizations of local order. 

On the 14th of February, 1869, Mr. Steele 
was united in marriage to Jliss Mary Eliza- 
beth Lakin, daughter of Simmons and ^lary 
(Matson) Lakin, of Rushville, this state. Of 
the five children of this union one died in 
infancy and another, Charles, died in early 
childhood. Rembrandt T. is a designer by 
profession and resides in Indianapolis; he 
married Miss Helen JIcKay and they have 
one son, Horace McKay Steele; Margaret 
married G. A. Neubacher, of Indianapolis, 
and has two children, Lewis and Robert, and 
Shirley L., who resides in Indianapolis, mar- 
ried Miss Myra Daggett, who has borne him 
one daughter, Margaret. Mrs. Steele, the de- 
voted wife and mother, was sununoned to the 
life eternal in 1900, having been a devoted 
member of Plymotith Congregational Church. 
On the 9th of August, 1908, Mr. Steele was 
united in marriage to Miss Selma Neubacher, 
who was born and reared in Indianapolis and 
who is a daughter of Lewis Neubacher. 

E. Oscar Lindenmuth, M. D. Dr. Linden- 
muth stands as one of the representative 
physicians and surgeons of the capital city, 
where he has been engaged in the practici! 
of his profes.sion since 1906 and where he is 
professor of dermatology, electro-therapeu- 
tics and X-ray in the Indiana University 
►School of Medicine. In the special field 
designated in the lines covered by his pro- 
fessorship in the medical stihool he is a recog- 
nized authority and he is a valued and popu- 
lar member of the faculty of this admirable 
institution. 

Dr. E. Oscar Lindenitiuth is of stanch Ger- 
man lineage and is a native of the old Key- 
stone state of the Union, having been born 
at Ringtown, Schuylkill County, Pennsyl- 
vania, on the 17th of March, 1872, and being 
a son of William D. and Hannah (Frye) Lin- 
denmuth, who now reside in Ringtown, Penn- 
sylvania, where the father is living virtually 
retired, after having devoted the major part 
of his active career to agricultural pursuits. 
Dr. Lindenmuth gained his early education 
in the public schools of his native town and 
in 1890 he entered Bloomsburg Literary In- 



ro4 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



stituti' and State Xoniial School, at iBlooms- 
hurtr, Pennsylvania, in which institution he 
was frraduated as a member of the class of 
1892. In the same year he was matriculated 
in Pott.s College, at Williamsport, Pennsyl- 
vania, in which he was graduated in the fol- 
lowing year, after which he devoted one year 
to the study of law. From Potts Collesie he 
received the degree of ]\I. E. After leaving 
collejre he was engaged in teaching in the 
public schools for six terms, after which he 
devoted five yeare to mercantile business, 
within which period he also prosecuted a care- 
ful study of medicine, under effective pre- 
coptoi-ship. In 1902 he entered the I\Iedico- 
Chirurgieal College at Philadelphia, Penn- 
sylvania, in which institution he completed 
the prescribed course and was graduated in 
1906, with the degree of Doctor ^f Medicine. 
While attending the medical college he uti- 
lized his summers and other vacation periods 
in taking special courses in X-ray and elec- 
tro-therapeutics, diseases of the eye, and 
physical and clinical diagnosis. In 1906 he 
completed a special course m dermatology in 
the medical department of the Univei-sity of 
Pennsylvania. In 1905-C, while attending 
medical college, the doctor served as assistant 
radiographer to the Medico-Chirurgical Hos- 
pital in Philadelphia, and in 1905 he wa.s 
also radiographer to the Howard Hospital, of 
the same city. 

In August, 1906, Dr. Lindenmuth estab- 
lished his residence in Indianapolis and 
opened an office at 320 North Meridian 
street, where he has since maintained his pro- 
fessional headquartei-s. He has built up a 
substantial and representative practice, and 
the same has ample basis on his unquestioned 
ability in both the theoretical and practical 
phases of his profession. Soon after locating 
in Indianapolis Dr. Lindenmuth was made 
incumbent of the chair of dermatology, elec- 
tro-therapeutics and X-ray in the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons, which was then in 
affiliation with the University of Indiana, at 
Bloomington. In 1908 the school became the 
organic and definite medical department of 
the state university, under the present title 
of the Indiana University School of Medicine, 
and upon this readjustment of management. 
Dr. Lindenmuth was elected to the chair of 
which hi' had previously been incumbent and 
in which he had siven most effective service. 
On the 1st of Jainiary. 1908, he was elected 
superintendent of the well ecjuippod hospital 
maintained in connection with the medical 
school, and to the duties of this important 
position he now gives much of his time and 
attention, proving an able administrative offi- 



cer as well as being thoroughly well fortihetl 
in a professional way. The doctor is a mem- 
ber of the American ^ledical Association, the 
American Roentgen Ray Society, the Indiana 
State .Medical Society, and the Indianapolis 
^Medical Society. In polities he gives his 
allegiance to the Republican party and also 
holds membership in the Clarion Club. Dr. 
Lindenmuth is one of those able physicians 
and surgeons who are well upholding the 
high prestige of the profession in the capital 
city of Indiana and he is thus specially en- 
titled to recognition in this publication. 

Emsley W. Johnson. A representative of 
old and honored pioneer families of the State 
of Indiana and, in the maternal line, of one 
whose name has been identified with the an- 
nals of ]Marion County from a very early 
period in its history, Emsley W. Johnson is 
a native of this county and here he has gained 
no little precedence as one of the able and 
successful younger members of its bar, being 
engaged in the practice of his profession in 
the capital city, as senior member of the firm 
of Johnson & Mohring. 

Emsley Wright Johnson, named in honor 
of his maternal grandfather, a distinguished 
figure in the history of Marion County, was 
born in the village of Old Augusta, Marion 
County. Indiana, on the 8th of May, 1878, 
and is a son of Joseph ]\I. and ^lary 
(AVright) Johnson, both natives of Marion 
County, where the former was born on the 1st 
of April, 1843, and the lattei' on the 23rd of 
November, 1848. Joseph M. Johnson is a son 
of William K. Johnson, who was of stanch 
English lineage and a member of a family 
that was foTinded in Virginia in the colonial 
era of our national history. From the Old 
Dominion state representatives of the familj- 
removed to Ohio, where Joseph ^I. was born 
and reared, and from Butler County, that 
state, he came to Indiana in 1825, becoming 
one of the early settlers of ]\Iariou County, 
where he reclaimed and developed a farm and 
became one of the influential citizens of his 
section. He remained on his old homestead 
until near his death, and in succeeding gen- 
erations the prestige of the name has been 
ably upheld in this county. Joseph M. John- 
son is now numbered among the representa- 
tive farmers and honored citizens of Wash- 
ington Township, this county, within whose 
borders his entire life has been passed. He 
is a man of strong individuality and sterling 
integrity and has ever maintained a secure 
hold upon popular confidence and esteem in 
the community where he has lived and la- 
bored to troodly ends. Tie served foui- years 
in the T'nion cause of the Civil War ns ;i 



HISTOEY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



"95 



member of Company F, Fifth Indiaua Cav- 
alry, and was taken prisoner at ^lacon, 
Georgia, being confined in Andersouville 
Prison for nine months. He is a Republican 
in politics. Of his three children Emsley "\V., 
of this review, is the second child; the eldest, 
Cora, is unmarried and lives with her parents, 
and Dr. AVilliam F., the youngest, is a suc- 
cessful physician and surgeon engaged in the 
practice of his profession in Indianapolis. 

Emsley "Wright, the maternal grandfather 
of him whose name initiates this article, was 
born in AA'ayue County, Indiana, in 1820, 
and was but six weeks old at the time his 
parents I'emoved thence to ^Marion County. 
He was a son of Joel Wright and the latter 
was a son of Philbert Wright, a native of 
Scotland. Joel Wright was a cousin of Gover- 
nor Joseph A. Wright. Emsley Wright mar- 
ried Lucy Strong, a descendant of Ira Strong, 
who came from Holland to America and set- 
tled in the present County of Addison. Ver- 
mont, later moving to Indiana. Joel Wright, 
father of Emsley Wright, was numbered 
among the first settlers of Marion County, In- 
diana, where he took up his abode at a time 
when this section was practicallj' an unbroken 
fore.st, and near what is now known as Merid- 
ian Heights. He secured a tract of govern- 
ment land and reclaimed a good farm before 
his death. The majority of his descendants 
have been identified with the great basic in- 
dustry of agriculture, and his son Emsley was 
no exception to the rule. Emsley Wright not 
only became a successful farmer and business 
man, but was also one of the early and spe- 
cially able lawyers of Marion County. He 
continued to reside on his farm in Washing- 
ton Township but his professional services 
were in requisition in all parts of the county, 
and he was identified with many important 
litigations in the eai'ly days, besides being a 
valued counsellor of broad and exact knowl- 
edge of the law. He died at an advanced age, 
and of his children two are now living. 

Emsley W. Johnson passed his boyhood 
days on the old homestead farm and early 
began to a.ssist in its work. After complet- 
ing the limited curriculum of the district 
school in the home district he continued his 
studies in the New Augusta high school, in 
which he was graduated as a member of the 
class of 1893. ' In 1896 he was matriculated 
in Butler College, located in Irvington, a 
suburb of Indianapolis, and in this institution 
he was graduated in 1900, with the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts. For effective work in But- 
ler College while a student there he received 
a scholarship in the ITniversity of Chicago, 
in which celebrated institution he was gradu- 



ated in 1901, with the supplemental degree 
of Bachelor of Philosophy. After leaving 
this university he was nuitriculated in the 
Indiana Law School, in Indianapolis, in 
which he was graduated a.s a member of the 
class of 1903, and from which he received the 
degree of Bachelor of Laws. He was ad- 
mitted to the bar of his native state and 
county in the month of his graduation and 
during the initial year of his practical work 
in his profession he was with the well known 
law firm of Elliott, Elliott & Littleton, of 
Indianapolis, of which firm Judge B.yron K. 
Elliott was the head. In September, 190-t, 
]Mr. Johnson entered into partnership with 
Orval E. ilejiring, a graduate of the Indiana 
Law School, and they have since been able 
and valued, coadjutors in the practice of 
their profession, in which their success has 
been of unequivocal order and in which their 
business is constantly increasing in scope and 
importance. The firm title of Johnson & 
Mehring has been maintained, from the time 
the alliance was formed. 

In politics Mr. Johnson is well fortified in 
his opinions and he is aligned as a stanch 
advocate of the principles and policies for 
which the Republican party stands sponsor. 
He is affiliated with Broad Ripple Lodge No. 
643. Free and Accepted Masons, and Indian- 
apolis Chapter No. 2, Royal Arch Masons, 
besides which he is identified with the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows and the Im- 
proved Order of Red Men, in which last he 
is past sachem. He also holds membership in 
the Marion Club and the Commercial Club, 
two of the representative civic organizations 
of the capital city. 

On the 8th of August, 1906, Mr. Johnson 
was united in marriage to Miss Katherine 
Griffin, who was born and reared in Green- 
field, Indiana, a daughter of Dr. L. B. Griffin, 
a representative citizen of that place. 

August B. ]\Ieyer. One of the designated 
functions of this publication touching the his- 
tory of "Greater Indianapolis" is to accord 
recognition to those who stand representative 
in their various fields of business activity, and 
from this consistent viewpoint there is pro- 
prietj' in noting the salient points in the 
career of August B. Meyer, who is president 
of the corporation of A. B. Meyer & Com- 
pany, dealers in coal and builders' supplies 
and known as one of the successful and in- 
fluential business men of his native city, 
where he is held in unqualified popular con- 
fidence and esteem. 

August B. Meyer was born in Indianapolis, 
on the 24th of December, 1853, and is a son of 
George F. and Catherine (Aug) Meyer, both 



796 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



of whom were boru iu Germany. Their mar- 
riage was solemnized in Cincinnati, Ohio, 
from which city they removed to Indianapolis 
in 1850. In Cincinnati George F. Meyer had 
learned the cigarmaker's trade and business, 
and upon coming to Indianapolis he here 
established the first specific cigar and tobacco 
store in the city. He continued to be actively 
identified with this line of business until his 
death, which occurred in 1872, at which time 
he was only forty-three years of age. He be- 
came a citizen of prominence and influence in 
business and civic life and the high regard in 
which he was held in the community is shown 
in the fact that he served two terms as treas- 
urer of Marion County, giving a most able 
and satisfactory administration. He was a 
worthy representative of the class of sterling 
German citizens who have contributed ma- 
terially to the industrial, commercial and 
civic upbuilding of Indiana's fair capital city. 
He was prominently identified with the Ma- 
sonic fraternity and also the Knights of 
Pythias, having been one of the first Scottish 
Rite Masons in the city. He was a man of 
the highest integrity in all the relations of 
life and well merited the high regard in which 
he was held. His wife survived him by more 
than thirty years, having been summoned to 
the life eternal in 1903, at the age of seventy- 
three years. They became the parents of 
eight children, of whom five are living, all 
being residents of Indianapolis, namely: 
Charles F., August B., George F., Edward 
H., and Adolph J. 

August B. Meyer is indebted to the public 
schools of Indianapolis for his early educa- 
tional training, and he also attended school 
for a time in Cincinnati. As a youth he 
found employment in his father's store, with 
whose conducting he was identified until it 
was closed, shortly after the death of his 
honored father. He then became associated 
with his brother in the operation of a cigar 
and tobacco store in the building now utilized 
by the concern of which he is president, the 
same being located on 17 and 19 North Penn- 
sylvania street. In 1877 Mr. Meyer initiated 
his identification with his present line of en- 
terprise, by purchasing a small coal yard and 
beginning operations on a limited capftal and 
essentially small scale. At the initiation of 
his efforts he made his deliveries with but one 
horse and a coal cart. Energy, perseverance 
and good management brought results, and 
the eventual outgrowth of this modest enter- 
prise is represented in the large and substan- 
tial business conducted by A. B. Meyer & 
Company, who now have' the largest coal 
vards and control the largest business of the 



kind, both wholesale and retail, in the city. 
It is needless to say that the highest in- 
tegritj' and honor figure as the real basis of 
the fine enteriDrise now controlled by the con- 
cern whose upbuilding is mainly the result of 
the efforts of Mr. Meyer. The present title 
has been utilized since 1879, and under the 
same there has been a consecutive growth and 
expansion during the long period of more 
than thirty years. The business is now in- 
corporated as a stock concern, Mr. Meyer 
having the controlling interest. The handling 
of building material has been an adjunct of 
the enterprise since 1892, and this depart- 
ment is now one of importance, with ample 
equipment and facilities. 

In 1903 Mr. Meyer became interested in 
the mining of coal, being associated in the 
organization of the United Fourth Vein Coal 
Company, whose mines are located near Lin- 
ton, Greene County, Indiana, and whose gen- 
eral offices are in Indianapolis. He is still a 
stockholder and director of this corporation, 
whose property is valuable and productive. 
Mr. Meyer is secretary and treasurer of the 
A. & C. Stone & Lime Company, with gen- 
eral offices in Indianapolis and plants at 
Greencastle, Ridgeland and Portland, this 
state. In 1886 he was elected president of 
the Western Coal Dealers' Association, rep- 
resenting a membership in eleven states, and 
he was also one of the organizfers of the Michi- 
gan & Indiana Retail Coal Association, of 
which he is now a director, and also vice- 
president. He is also a member of the direc- 
torate of the National Builders' Supply Asso- 
ciation. He is essentially liberal, loyal and 
progressive as a citizen, and this is typified 
by his membership in the Indianapolis Board 
of Trade, of whose board of governors he was 
a member in the '80s. He also holds member- 
ship in the Commercial Club, the Marion 
Club and the Columbia Club, representative 
civic organizations 6f his home city. He is 
affiliated with the Masonic fraternity, in 
which he has attained the thirty-second de- 
gree of the Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite, 
and is also identified with Murat Temple, An- 
cient Arabic Order of the Nobles of the Mys- 
tic Shrine, as well as with Marion Lodge No. 
1, Knights of Pythias. 

In 1892 was solemnized the marriage of 
Mr. Meyer to Miss Minnie B. linger, of Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania, and she was sum- 
moned to the life eternal in March, 1905, 
being survived by one child, Sara Catherine. 

Dr. John M. Kitchen has for many years 
been prominently associated with the medical 
profession in Indianapolis. He was born at 
Piqua in Miami County, Ohio, July 12, 1826, 




J^,/-d^^o<.t^ 



HISTOEY 0¥ GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



797 



and resolving early in his life to make tlio 
practice of medicine his life's work and after 
suitable instructions in the office of a local 
practitioner of good standing, he attended 
lectures at the Jefferson Medical College of 
Philadelphia and at the University Medical 
College of New York City, graduating from 
the latter institution in ^March of 1846. Dr. 
Kitchen entered upon the work at Fori 
Wayne, Indiana, but remained there only un- 
til 1849, when he started upon the then long 
journey to California as second physician on 
an emigrant ship. Arriving in that state 
after a seven months' voyage around Cape 
Horn he began practicing in San Francisco, 
and continued there until Alarch of ' 1850, 
when he went on foot to the mining regions 
near the head waters of the Yuba River and 
established a small hospital for the miners 
there, performing the manifold duties of 
cock, nurse and physician. The experience 
that he gained there proved valuable to him 
in his after life. He had great difficulty in 
procuring medical supplies, and it was fre- 
quently necessary for him to rely almost en- 
tirely on nature to furnish him his remedies, 
and the often unexpected favorable results 
which followed were splendid lessons for him 
in his later practice. 

Choosing Indianapolis for a permanent lo- 
cation in 1851, he has for more than forty 
years endeavored conscientiously to perform 
the duties required of a general practitioner 
of medicine and surgery, and has occasion- 
ally contributed brief articles for medical 
journals. He is a member of the Marion 
County Medical Society, of the Indiana 
State Medical Society of the American Medic- 
al Association, and he has at different times 
held public office, including president of the 
board of trustees of the city hospital, trustee 
of the Indiana Institution for the Deaf and 
Dumb, physician to the state institution for 
the blind, consulting physician to the city 
hospital, consulting physician to the state 
institution for the deaf, from 1861 to 1865 
surgeon in charge of the United States Gen- 
era] Army Hospital at Indianapolis, president 
of the Board of United States Examining 
Phj'T^icians for Pensions from 1886 to 1893, 
and has for many years been medical exam- 
iner for many of the leading life insurance 
companies of this country. Having acquired 
a competency by his professional skill, indus- 
try and good business management. Dr. 
Kitchen has retired from general practice and 
during late years has confined himself to 
office and consultation practice, and the en- 
joyment of the recreation and repose which 



his long and faithfuL de-«otiou to his profes- 
sion so justly entitles him. 

Dr. Kitchen married in Indianapolis in 
1853 JIary F. Bradley, a daughter of John H. 
dradley, of this city, and they have one son, 
Joiin B., a broker in Chicago. 

!^DWARD L. McKee. A member of one of 
ihe ftonored pioneer families of Indiana and 
one Miose lineage, both direct and collateral, 
is ofsdistinguished order, Edward Lodge ^tc- 
Kee has well maintained the prestige of the 
name which he bears, through his leal and 
loyal services as a citizen and as a man of 
large and important business activities. He 
is one of the representative factors in the 
financial and business circles of the capital 
city of his native state, where he is president 
of the Merchants' Heat & Light Company, an 
important public-utility corporation, and 
where he is a principal and official in a num- 
ber of other corporations of representative 
order. Not only has he large capitalistic in- 
terests, but he is also a man whose integrity 
and resourcefulness have been potent influ- 
ences in connection with the upbuilding of 
"Greater Indianapolis", where his interests 
are centered and where he holds an impreg- 
nable position in • popular confidence and 
esteem. 

Edward Lodgf McKee was born in Madi- 
son. Jefferson County, Indiana, on the 13th 
of March, 1856. and is a son of Robert S. and 
Celine Elizabeth (Lodge) McKee. To sturdy 
Scotch-Irish stock is the lineage of the Mc- 
Kee family traced, and in the maternal line 
the subject of this review is a scion of promi- 
nent pioneer families of Kentucky and In- 
diana. The McKees were Scotch Covenanters 
and were among those of this faith who were 
driven from Scotland to the north of Ireland 
to escape religious persecution in their native 
land. In Ireland the direct line of descent 
is traced back to Sir Patrick McKee, who be- 
came seized of a fine landed estate of two 
thousand acres in the province of Ulster, 
where he owned a castle, besides a bawn in 
County Down. From this same section of 
Ireland have immigrated to America many 
families whose names have been prominent in 
connection with the annals of our republic — 
the Grants, McClellans, Camerons, Stuarts. 
Polks, Todds and many others who aided in 
laying broad and deep the foundations of our 
national prosperity. 

James McKee, grandfather of Edward L., 
was born in Ireland on the 23rd of May, 1793. 
and there his wife, whose maiden name was 
Agnes McMullan, was born on the 14th of 
November in the same year. Their marriage 
was solemnized on the 6th of December, 1813 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



Mrs. ]\IeKee died in Ireland, October 5, 1837. 
and is buried at Slane, and her husband 
passed away in Wheeling, West Virginia, in 
August, 1863, at the venerable age of seventy 
3'ears. The names of their children, with re- 
spective dates of birth, are here noted : 
James M., November 4, 1817; AVilliam H., 
August 10, ISlfi; Robert S., January 8, 1823; 
Eliza Ann, April 29. 1824: Margaret, Sep- 
tember 18, 1825 ; and Sophie, August 3, 182S. 
William H., the second son, came to America 
and settled in Philadelphia, and he became a 
successful and influential business man. He 
passed the closing years of his life in the 
AVest, where he died on the 24th of Novem- 
ber, 1867. 

Robert S. McKee was born in TuUycavy, 
Downpatriek, Coxint.v Down, Ireland, and the 
date of his nativity has already been noted. 
Concerning his career the following pertinent 
data are given in a previously published 
sketch, and so appreciative is the estimate 
that it is found expedient to make but slight 
metaphrase in having recourse to the same. 

"His educational advantages, compared 
with modern facilities, were meager. But 
uncompromising circumstances did not seem 
to hamper him. The spirit which dominated 
his life was early made manifest. When only 
thirteen years of age he pluckily left the land 
of his birth to join his brother William, who 
had settled in Philadelphia. Crossing the 
ocean alone, the boy duly found his brother. 
Within a short time after his arrival he ob- 
tained employment as clerk for a company en- 
gaged in transporting goods over the moun- 
tains between Baltimore and Wheeling. In 
this connection he gained an experience that 
gave him eonfidenoe to start in business for 
himself while still a young man. In 1847 he 
floated down the Ohio River on a flat boat 
and located at ^ladison, Indiana, where, in 
partnership with Josiah S. Weyer, he engaged 
in the wholesale grocery business, under the 
name of Weyer & ^McKee. The business was 
.subsequently conducted by R. S. IMcKee & 
Company, and the house became well known 
all over the country, and before the Civil 
War its business attained to such proportions 
that its trade amounted to a million dollars 
annually. As his capital increased he became 
interested in other lines of enterprise, being 
prominently associated with the National 
Branch Bank at Madison and with the Madi- 
son Fire & Marine Insurance Company. In 
1865, removing to Louisville, Kentucky, he 
there founded the wholesale grocery house 
of McKee, Cunningham & Company, which 
gained control of a large patronage through- 
out the entire south. To meet the demands 



placed upon the institution Mr. McKee 
erected a large building for its use and ex- 
tended its operations in various ways. He 
became prominent in ^ other connections in 
Louisville, being a member of the first board 
of directors of the Citizens' National Bank 
and otherwise active in the promotion of 
various enterprises that tended to advance 
the material and civic prosperity of the citj'. 

"In 1872 :Mr. JIcKee removed to Indian- 
apolis, where he met with a degree of success 
that completely overshadowed his earlier 
achievements. Organizing the wholesale boot 
and shoe house of ^IcKee & Branham, which 
later became incorporated under the name of 
the IMcKee Shoe Company, Jlr. McKee was 
made the president and continued to serve 
as such until his death. It was largely a re- 
sult of his intelligent and efi'ective manage- 
ment that the concern met with the success 
which made it one of the notable commercial 
enterprises of the capital city. Under his 
guidance the company became foremost 
among the leading shoe houses of the country 
and held an important relation to the trade 
at large. 

"Though he started in life with no mate- 
rial advantages, ilr. ]\IcKee demonstrated the 
fact that ability and strength of will are su- 
perior weapons with which to~ fight the battle 
of life. His mental faculties were clear, his 
mind active and receptive, and his intelli- 
gence keen and broad. He became noted for 
his intellectual acquirements and remarkable 
fund of information. His qualities as ,a 
leader were unquestioned, and he became one 
of the foremost figures in commercial and 
financial circles in Indianapolis, where the 
last thirty years of his life were spent. He 
was a director of the Indiana National Bank, 
was the first secretary of the Belt Railroad & 
Stock Yards Company, and during his later 
years he owned a large amount of valuable 
realty in the city. All his investments were 
marked by a judgment and foresight that 
testified to his exceptional business acumen. 
Of a most positive character, he had a force 
of personality that well befitted his Scotch- 
Irish blood. He was noted for his integrity 
and for the honorable methods that character- 
ized all his dealings, and perhaps his most 
notable trait was his abhorrence of debt. 
Consistent in his adherence to the faith of 
his forefathers. ]\Ir. ^IcKee was long recog- 
nized as a leader in the First Presbyterian 
Church, in which he served many years as an 
elder. His death, which occurred at his home 
in this city, on the ]Oth of June. 1903, re- 
moved from Indianapolis one who had done 
much to promote its best interests and to 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



rg'J 



brinof it to a position among the leading busi- 
ness Renters of the United States. His high 
civic ideals and public spirit made him ready 
to lend his active co-operation to whatever 
promised to serve the public interests or 
benefit his fellow men in any way. His re- 
mains were interred in Crown Hill cemetery, 
with simple funeral services, conducted by the 
pastor of the First Presbyteri.nn Church, and 
his sons acted as pall bearers." 

In a thoroughly unostentatious way 'Sir. 
McKee gave much to worthy charitable and 
benevolent objects and institutions, as well 
as to individual persons deserving of his aid 
and sympathy. His nature was strong and 
true, and. knowing men at their real value, 
he had no toleration of deceit or meanness in 
any of the relations of life. He did not come 
so largely into the attention of the public eyo 
as did .many of his contemporaries who ac- 
complished less and who did less for the 
world, but he felt the responsibilities which 
success imposes and ever endeavored to live 
up to these responsibilities, in the straight- 
forward undemonstrative way characteristic 
of the man. His name merits an enduring 
place on the roster of the honored and valued 
citizens and pioneers of the State of Indiana. 
Though manifesting naught of ambition for 
political preferment, he was a stanch and in- 
telligent advocate of the principles of the Re- 
publican party, and ever kept in close touch 
with the questions and issues of the hour, the 
while never neglecting any civic duty. Mr. 
McKee was a man whose spirit was never 
soiled by unfaithfulness or unkindness. His 
was not a vacillating character and he ever 
had the courage of his convictions, but he was 
tolerant in his judgment of his fellow men, 
devoted to those allied to him by consan- 
guinity, and in a most quiet way showed his 
charitable spirit in effective lines. A noble 
and gracious personality indicated the man, 
and his life was one worthy of the honored 
name which he bore. 

Robert S. McKee was twice married. In 
1850 was solemnized his union with Miss 
Celine Elizabeth Lodge, who was born in the 
State of Indiana, and who died in 1861. In 
1866 he married Miss Mary Louise Lodge, a 
sister of his first wife, and of his six children 
four were born of the first and two of the 
second marriage. Concerning them the fol- 
lowing brief data are given : William J., 
who served as brigadier general of Indiana 
Volunteers in the Spanish-American War, is 
a representative citizen of Indianapolis; Ed- 
ward L., of this review, was the next in order 
of birth : James Robert, who married Miss 
Mary S. Harrison, daughter of the late Gen- 



I'ral Benjamin Harrison of Indianapolis, 
former president of the United States, is 
now general manager of the General Electric 
Company, of New York City ; Frank Latham 
is engaged in business in the national metrop- 
olis ; Richard Boone was a successful business 
man of Indianapolis and died in 1907; and 
Celine Lodge is the wife of Charles W. Mer- 
I'ill, one of the interested principals in the 
Bobbs-Merrill Company, the well known pub- 
lishers of Indianapolis. ^Mrs. IMcKee was 
born at Madison and was a daughter of Will- 
iam Johnston Lodge and Mary Grant 
(Lemon) Lodge. In the agnatic line she was 
a descendant of Christopher Clark, and in 
the maternal line she was connected with the 
Boone, Grant and JMorgan families. From 
the sketch to which recourse has previously 
been taken, the following genealogical ex- 
tracts are made: 

"William Johnston Lodge was named for 
his mother's family, her maiden name having 
been Johnston. She was a direct descendant 
of Christopher Clark, who came to this coun- 
try in 162.5, receiving a grant of land from 
the king. He settled in what is now Hanover 
County, Virginia. His daughter, Agnes 
Clark, married Lord Robert Johnston, a 
younger son of the Earl of Shaftsbury. In 
two generations Jhere were only two sons. 
They dropped the 't' and were known by the 
name of Johnson. 

"Captain William Grant, great-great- 
grandfather of Edward L. McKee, was born 
February 22, 1726, and married Elizabeth 
Boone, born February 5, 173.3, daughter of 
Squire and Sarah (ilorgan) Boone and a sis- 
ter of the historic character, Daniel Boone. 
Mr. and I\Irs. Grant died June 22, 1804, and 
February 2.5, 1814, respectively. Their chil- 
dren were as follows : Mary, born September 
22, 1752, married Moses Mitchell ; John, born 
January 30, 1754, died November 11, 1825, 
having been a colonel of militia ; he married 
Molly Mosby; Israel, born December 14, 1756, 
married Susanna Bryan, and his death oc- 
curred in October, 1796 ; Sarah, born January 
25, 1759, married John Sanders, and her 
death occurred ^March 28, 1814 ; William, born 
January 10, 1761, married Sarah Mosby, and 
he died February 20, 1814: Samuel, born No- 
vember 23, 1762. married Lydia Craig, and 
he was killed by Indians, August 13, 1789; 
Squire Boone, born September 19, 1764, mar- 
ried Susanna Hand, and his death occurred 
June 10, 1833; Elizabeth, born August 28, 
1766, married John !\Iosby, and died January 
18, 1804; Moses, born October 3, 1768, was 
killed bv Indians, August 13, .1789; Hannah, 
bnrn :\rarch 30, 1771, died March 30, 1777; 



800 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



and Rebecca Boone, born June 4. 1774, mar- 
ried John Lemon, and died December 7, 1858. 

"The father of this family. Captain Will- 
iam Grant, was a man of eood education for 
Ihe time in which he flourished, had substan- 
tial standinor as an extensive land owner, and 
was a stanch patriot during: the Revolution, 
being a trusted member of the committee of 
safetj' in North Carolina. He also gave 
active service in that struggle. Later, in 
company with his intrepid brother-in-law, 
Daniel Boone, he was among those who de- 
fended the frontier, and he was one of the 
few who escaped with Boone at the battle of 
the Blue Lick in Kentucky, Majors Hugh 
McGary and Levi Todd being also among the 
survivors of that encounter. 'The Story of 
Bryan's Station,' Kentucky', sets forth that 
it was founded by those North Carolinians, 
William, ^Morgan. Ja7nes and Joseph Bryan, 
of whom the first named was the leading 
spirit. With them was William Grant, whose 
wife, like the wife of William Bryan, was a 
sister of Daniel Boone. All the Bryans were 
elderly but stalwart woodmen at the time of 
their settlement in Kentuekj'. and each was 
bles.sed with a large family of children. As 
the children were all erown, they felt 'pre- 
pared for straggling Indians at least, as with 
dogs and flint-lock rifles, pack horses and 
cows, they set out from the valley of the Yad- 
kin.' At" the battle of the Elkhorn, William 
Grant was wounded, and his brother-in-law. 
William Bryan, was killed. In the record of 
William Grant's family previously given it 
will be noted that two of his sons. Samuel 
and Moses, were killed by the Indians. They 
had come over to Indiana from Kentucky, 
with Colonel Johnson, on an expedition to 
punish thieving Indians, and with others were 
ambushed, a number being killed, among 
them one of the Grants. The other brother 
went back to look for him. in company with 
a relative who volunteered to a.ssi.st him. and 
they, too, were slain. Grant Countv, Indiana. 
is named in their honor. William Grant liverl 
to a good old age. and to the close of his life 
was respected as a superior character— a 
typical gentleman of the old .school, dignified, 
honorable and worthy of the regard in which 
he was held. He left p<-opertv. including 
slaves, and many of his descendants still re- 
side in. Indiana and Kentuckv." 

Edward Lodce McKee tn whom this re- 
view is dedicated, trained his rudimentary 
education in the public schools of his native 
town of Madi.son. Indiana, and was nine years 
of aee at the time of the family removal to 
Louisville, Kentucia-. in ISfi.i In that city 
he continued his educational discipline in the 



public schools.- and later he returned to Madi- 
son, where he attended the high school for a 
time. He initiated his business career as a 
youth of sixteen years, by securing employ- 
ment in a wholesale shoe house in Indianapo- 
lis, and with this important line of enter- 
prise he has continued to be identified during 
the long intervening years, marked by large 
and worthy success, gained through his well 
directed endeavors. It may truthfully be 
said that, beginning as a clerk, he has been 
employed in every capacity in connection with 
the wholesale .shoe trade except that of travel- 
ing salesman, and he has long been a recog- 
nized authority in connection with this line of 
commercial enterprise. After having gained 
thorough experience in the details of the busi- 
ness, in 1879, when but twenty-three years of 
age, he became associated with his brother 
James R. and Aquilla Jones in the founding 
of the wholesale shoe house of Jones, McKee 
& Company, of Indianapolis. The enterprise 
was continiied under this title, and with con- 
stantly expanding trade, until 1896, when the 
McKee Shoe Company was orsranized and in- 
corporated for the continuing of the business 
with larger internal and commercial facilities. 
Of this company Edward L. McKee has been 
vice-president from the beginning, and to his 
progressive ideas, energj', application and 
marked administrative talent has been in 
large measure due the upbuilding of the 
splendid institution which contributes in large 
degree to the commercial prestige and stabil- 
ity of the capital city. 

Mr. ilcKee's facility in the handling of af- 
fairs of broad scope and importance has 
marked him for interposition in other repre- 
sentative enterprises in his home city. In 
1896 he was elected vice-president of the In- 
diana National Bank, an ineumbencj'' which 
he retained until 1904. when he resigned the 
office, though he still continued a member of 
the directorate of this strong and conservative 
financial institution. He is also a member of 
the board of directors of the Union Trust 
Company, vice-president of the extensive re- 
tail dry goods house of H. P. Wasson & Com- 
pany, and president of the Atlanta Tin Plate 
& Sheet Iron Company. He was one of the 
organizers and incorporators of the Mer- 
chants' Heat & Light Company, of which he 
has been president since 1904. and to the de- 
veloping of whose fine service he has given 
his personal attention. 

Aggressive and broad-minded, Mr. McKee 
has wielded a potent influence in commercial 
and financial atTairs in the Hoosier metrop- 
olis, and none is more appreciative of the at- 
traction.« and advantages of Indianapolis or 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



801 



whose faith in its still further growth and ad- 
vancement is of more insistent type. He is 
identified with various civic and fraternal or- 
ganizations of a representative character, is 
a stanch advocate of the principles of the Re- 
publican party, though never an aspirant for 
public office, and he holds to the religious 
faith in which he was reared, being a member 
of the First Presbj'terian Church. His wife 
holds membership in the ileridian Street 
Methodist Episcopal Church. 

The following tribute from Volney T. Ma- 
lott, one of the most honored and influential 
citizens and leading capitalists of Indian- 
apolis, is well worthy of perpetuation in this 
connection, as he has been associated in an 
intimate way both with the late Robert S. 
McKee as well as with Edward L. McKee. 

"Robert S. McKee was one of our best 
citizens, a man of sterling worth, possessed 
of the highest honor, a merchant of the old 
school, thoroughly and carefully trained, ex- 
act with himself and others in all business 
transactions. He took a large interest in 
civil affairs. He was liberal in his contribu- 
tions to his church and various charitable in- 
stitutions. As a bank director in Madison, 
Indiana, Loui.sville, Kentucky, and Indian- 
apolis, covering a period of more than fifty 
years, he was always prompt and regular in 
attendance and was a valuable member of the 
board, his business training and large experi- 
ence rendering him conservatively progres.sive 
and, together with his closely analytical mind, 
making him a valuable counsellor on any 
board. His son, Edward L. McKee, president 
of the ^lerchants' Light & Heat Company, 
was carefully trained by the father and, in- 
heriting many of the latter 's qualities, is a 
man of quick grasp and fertile resources. He 
has a pleasing personality that has won for 
him hosts of friends." 

Edv.ard L. IMcKee shows in his gracious 
personality and his unmistakable popularity 
that he is "to the manor born", having been 
reared in a thoroughly patrician home and 
having touched the best of social life from 
his vouth to the present. 

On the 21st of February, 1900, Mr. McKee 
was united in marriage to Miss Grace Wasson, 
daughter of Hiram P. Wasson, one of the 
representative business men of Indianapolis 
and of whom specific mention is made on 
other pages of this volume. Mr. and Mrs. 
^IcKee have two children, Edward L., Jr., 
and Hiram AVasson. 

Henry C. SciiROF.nER, the present incum- 
bent of the responsible office of township 
trustee of Center Township, Clarion County, 
in which the capital city is located, came to 



America from Germany as a youth without 
financial resources or influential friends, and 
his career since that time has been marked by 
earnest application, through which he has 
gained a position of independence, the while 
he has so ordered his course as to retain at 
all times the confidence and regard of his 
fellow men. He has maintained his home in 
Indianapolis during the major portion of the 
time since coming to the United States, and 
here has been identified with various business 
interests, including long and faithful service 
in connection with railroad affairs. 

Mr. Schroeder was born in Hanover, Ger- 
many, on the 3rd of August, 1862, and is a 
son of Kaspejr and Anne (Bruenger) Schroe- 
der, both of whom passed their entire lives in 
Germany, where the father followed the voca- 
tion of farmer. But nine years of age at the 
time of his mother's death, Henry C. Schroe- 
der thereafter became largely dependent upon 
his own resources, though he received the ad- 
vantages of the excellent schools of his father- 
land, under the compulsory education laws. 
After leaving school he served a thorough 
apprenticeship at the shoemaker's trade, de- 
voting four years to such preliminary disci- 
pline, through which he became a skilled 
artisan in the line. Thereafter he worked as 
a journej'man at his trade in his native land 
until he was nineteen years of age, when he 
severed the ties which bound him to home and 
fatherland and set forth to seek his fortune 
in America. He landed in New York with a 
cash capital of but one dollar but with the 
fortification of courage, ambition and self- 
reliance, so that he has not failed in his serv- 
ices as one of the world's noble army of 
workers. Later Mr. Schroeder took up his 
residence in Indianapolis, where he secured 
work at his trade, but within a short interval 
he began work in a furniture factory. Later 
he was employed in the old Eagle machine 
works, and upon leaving this position he 
initiated his career in connection with rail- 
road interests, by securing a position as car 
repairer in the shops of the Pittsburg, Cincin- 
nati, Chicago & St. Louis Railroad, from 
which position he was advanced to that of 
brakeman on the Panhandle Railroad. After 
his marriage he was employed as car inspector 
of passenger cars at the union station in In- 
dianapolis, retaining this incumbency for a 
period of ten years, at the expiration of which 
he- resigned. While thus employed he was 
associated with John Groff in the organiza- 
tion of the Order of Railway Car Men. 

After his retirement from railroad work 
]\Ir. Schroeder engaged in the retail shoe 
business, in which he continued about three 



fllSTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



years, and after disposing of this business 
he was a member of the city police force for 
eight j'ears, during the last three of which 
he held the office of sergeant. Upon his resig- 
nation from the police department he engaged 
in the retail coal business, in which he con- 
tinued for four and one-half years, disposing 
of this business when he was elected trustee 
of Center Township, in November, 1908. To 
the duties of this office he has since given the 
major portion of his time and attention and 
ho has proved an efficient public official and 
one whose course has been marked by fidelity 
and by careful consideration of the best in 
terests of the county and its people. In poli- 
tics he is a stanch advocate of the cause of 
the Democratic party, in whose ranks he has 
been an etfective worker. Mr. Schroeder is 
affiliated with the Masonic fraternity, in 
which he holds membership in Logan Lodge 
No. 575, Free and Accepted Masons, and In- 
dianapolis Chapter No. 5, Roj'al Arch Masons. 
He also holds membership in the Ancient Or- 
der of Druids and the Improved Order of 
Red Men. 

In 18S3 Mr. Schroeder was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Mary Tebbe, daughter of Henry 
Tebbe, of Indianapolis, and they have two 
children, namely: Harry and Myrtle Schroe- 
der. 

A],BERT E. Sterne, M. D. Occupying a 
distinguished position among those who are 
ably upholding the high prestige of the medic- 
al profession in the State of Indiana and its 
capital city. Dr. Sterne is giving special at- 
tention to the treatment of mental and nerv- 
ous diseases, in which he is a recognized au- 
thority and in which his reputation far tran- 
scends local limitations. He has been an ex- 
tensive and valued contributor to the best 
periodicals and standard literature of his 
profession, has prosecuted a large amount of 
original research and investigation, has ren- 
dered effective service as a member of the 
faculty of the Indiana University School of 
Medicine in Indianapolis, and his success in 
active practice has been on a parity with h;s 
admirable professional ability. He owns and 
conducts the "Norways" Sanatorium, one of 
the fine institutions of the capital city, and 
the same .is devoted to the treatment of nerv- 
ous and mental diseases, both medical and 
surgical. 

Dr. Albert Eugene Sterne was born in the 
city of Cincinnati, Ohio, on the 28th of April, 
1866, and is a son of Charles F. and Eugenia 
(Fries) Sterne, the former of whom was a 
native of Wurtemberg, Oerniany. and the 
latter of Furth, Bavaria. His father was a 
scion of sterling German ancestry, and Dr. 



Sterne's maternal grandfather was a man of 
high intellectual attainments, having been a 
professor of physiology in German universi- 
ties and having also attained the high dis- 
tinction of membership in the Legion of 
Honor. Both he and his son were knighted 
by the King of Spain for certain discoveries 
in chemistry. Charles F. Sterne came to In- 
diana about the year of 1842, and became one 
of the prominent and influential business 
men of the Hoosier state. He established his 
home in the City of Peru and contributed in 
generous measure to its industrial and civic 
advancement. He was the founder and 
owner of the mills in that city, known as the 
Peru Woolen Mills, and was associated with 
various other lines of business entei-prise, all 
of which proved of benefit to the town. He 
there established the gas plant, installing an 
excellent system, and his public spirit found 
manifestation in many other lines of normal 
enterprise. He was at one time an Indian 
trader. In his woolen mills there were manu- 
factured at one time all the blankets used by 
the Pullman Car Company. He also had 
capitalistic interests in other parts of the 
state and was known as a man of great ad- 
ministrative and initiative ability and as a 
citizen of the highest character. He passed 
the closing years of his life in Peru, Indiana, 
where he died in 1880, on the 28th of August, 
when fifty-two years of age and when his sou 
Albert was a lad of thirteen. His devoted 
wife, a woman of most gracious personalitj-, 
was sununoned to the life eternal in 1881, six 
months after the death of her husband. 

Dr. Sterne gained his rudimentary educa- 
tion in the public schools of Peru, Cincinnati 
and Indianapolis, and at the age of eleven 
years he became a .student in Professor Kin- 
ney's celebrated Cornell School at Ithaca, 
New York, where he remained for one year, 
after which he continued his educational 
work for four years in Mount Pleasant I\Iili- 
tarj' Academy at Sing Sing, New York. lu 
the autumn of 1883, at the age of seventeen 
years the doctor was matriculated in the 
literary department of Harvard University, 
in which historic old institution he completed 
the classical course and was graduated as a 
member of the class of 1887, with the degree 
of Bachelor of Arts, cum laude. 

In the meanwhile Dr. Sterne had outlined 
definite plans for his future career and had 
determined to prepare himself for the med- 
ical profession. In the prosecution of his 
purpose he was afforded the best of advan- 
tages. He was graduated in Harvai'd in 
June, 1887, and in the following fall he went 
to Europe for the purpose of taking up the 



HISTOEY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



study of medicine in the fine continental uni- 
versities. He remained abroad for a period 
of sis years, within which he devoted his at- 
tention to the study of medicine in leading 
institutions at Strassburw, Heidelbertr, Berlin, 
Vienna and Paris, as well as in Dublin, Edin- 
bursrh and London. In 1891 he was gradu- 
ated from the medical department of the Uni- 
versity of Berlin, from which he secured his 
dee:ree of Doctor of Medicine, magna cum 
laude. While abroad he had the best of clin- 
ical experience in hospitals of the highest 
reputation, having been an assistant in a 
number of such institutions in various cities 
—notably the Charity Hospital in Berlin, the 
Salpetriere in Paris, the Rotunda in Dublin 
and the Queen's Square in London. He had 
the distinction of being the promoter and 
founder of the Society of American Physi- 
cians in the City of Berlin, Germany, an or- 
ganization that has continued to be one of 
essentially representative order. 

Thus admirably fortified for the -work of 
his chosen profession. Dr. Sterne returned to 
America in 189-3 and soon afterward estab- 
lished himself in practice in Indianapolis, 
where he has since held distinctive prece- 
dence and where his success has been of the 
most unequivocal type, ba.sed alilf° upon his 
fine professional ability and skill aid his per- 
sonal popularity. He save his attention to 
the general practice of medicine and surgery 
for a number of years, in connection with 
effective service in the leading local hospitals, 
and in later years he has concentrated his 
energies largely in the treatment of nervous 
and mental diseases, and brain surgery. 
Realizing the demand for a private institu- 
tion for the treatment of this serious class 
of disorders Dr. St«rne consulted -ways and 
means and finally was able to establish his 
present fine sanatorium, known as "Nor- 
ways". He purchased the old Fletcher 
homestead, opposite Woodruff Park, and 
after extensive remodeling and the building 
of requisite additions this now constitutes 
one of the finest private sanatoriums in the 
United States. Its equipment is of the high- 
est modern standard throughout, its .sanitary 
provisions of the most approved order and its 
surroundings make it an especially ideal place 
for the treatment of nervous and mental dis- 
orders, to which specific purpose it is essen- 
tially devoted. "Norways" Sanatorium has 
gained a wide and noteAvorthy reputation 
and its patronage has come from the mo<*t 
diverse sections of the TTnion. while in a mere 
local sense its superior advantages have 
gained for it an essentially representative 
support. 
Vol. 11—11 



Dr. Sterne is an appi'eeiative and valued 
member of the Ajneriean ^ledical Association, 
the Medico-Legal Society of New York, the 
Mississippi Valley ]\ledical Society, the In- 
diana State Jledical Society and the Indian- 
apolis ^Medical Society, and he is a member 
and now the president of the Ohio Valley 
Medical Societ.y. His contributions to the 
literature of his profession cover a wide realm 
and have been largely devoted to the discus- 
sion of original propositions and practical in- 
formation relating to nervous and mental 
diseases, than which the physician finds none 
more difficult and perplexing in diagnosis and 
treatment. In 1894 Dr. Sterne was appointed 
to the chair of nervous and mental diseases 
in the Central College of Physicians and Sur- 
geons, and he has since continued the incum- 
bent of this important professorship, in which 
his services have been of the most admirable 
and effective order, in the Indiana University 
School of iFedieine. He is consulting neurolo- 
gist to the City Hospital and Dispensary, now 
a part of the Indiana University Medical 
School, to the Deaconess Hospital, the Flower 
Mission and other local institutions, and not- 
withstanding the ex'actions of his private pro- 
fessional affairs he gives loyal and faithful at- 
tention to the duties of each of these posi- 
tions. He was formerly an a.ssociate editor 
of the Journal of Nervo^is and Mental Dis- 
eases, published in New York City, and has 
also withdrawn from the editorship of the 
Medical Monitor. Governor Durbin appoint- 
ed Dr. Sterne Assistant Surgeon General of 
Indiana, with rank of Lieutenant Colonel. 

Liberal and progressive as a citizen. Dr. 
Sterne manifests a deep interest in all that 
tends to material and civic welfare of his 
home city, and here his friends are of a rep- 
resentative character— in professional, busi- 
ness and social circles. Though he has had 
no desire to enter the arena of practical poli- 
tics he gives an unqualified allegiance to the 
Republican party and lends his aid and in- 
fluence unreservedly in the promotion of its 
cause. He is identified with the Columbia, 
Commercial, University and Harvard Clubs 
apd the German House. He is a man of 
abiding human sympathy and tolerance, and 
in his profession he has made this sympathy 
more than mere sentiment — for it has repre- 
sented an actuating motive for helpfulness. 
He is well known in his home city and state, 
and holds a commanding position in his pro- 
fession. 

On the 4th of March, 1905, was solemnized 
the marriage of Dr. Sterne and Laura Mercy 
Laughlin, a daughter of James A. and ^lary 
(Carey) Laughlin, of Walnut Hills, Cincin- 



804 



HISTOEY OF GREATER IXDIAXAPOLIS. 



nati. Oliio. She was called from this life on 
the 25th of May, 1909, and is interred at 
Crown Hill. Her death was lamentable and 
her many friends still mourn her loss. Mrs. 
Sterne was an accomplished musician and a 
most beautiful woman, and was but thirty- 
five years of age at the time of her death. 

Ai.Mus G. Rt^ddell. Among the represen- 
tative business men of the younger generation 
ir his native city is numbered Mr. Ruddell, 
who is president of the Central Rubber & 
Supply Company, one of the successful in- 
dustrial concerns of the capital city. 

;\rr. Ruddell is not only a native son of 
Indiana, but is also a scion of one of its 
honored pioneer families. He was born in 
Indianapolis on the 29th of July, 1873, and 
is a son of James H. and Mary Hannah (Vin- 
ton) Ruddell. James Henry Ruddell was 
born at Allisonville, IMarion County, this 
state, and was a son of Dr. Ambrose G. Rud- 
dell, who was a native of Kentucky and who 
became one of the prominent pioneer physi- 
cians of Indiana, where he continued in the 
practice of his profession until his death. 
James H. Ruddell was reared and educated 
in Indiana and attained no little distinction 
as a member of its bar, having been engaged 
in the successful practice of law in Indianapo- 
lis at the time of his death, which occurred 
when he was forty-four years of age, in 1884. 
He served as a member of the lower house of 
the Indiana legislature in 1869 and proved 
an able conservator of the public interests as 
well as of the cause of the Republican party, 
in whose councils he wielded no little influ- 
ence in his native state. He is survived by 
two sons, of whom Almus G. is the elder: 
Frank S., the younger son, is a salesman by 
vocation and is now a resident of Indian- 
apolis, having been graduated in Leland Stan- 
ford University, in California, as a member 
of the class of 1897. Soon after the death 
of her husband IMrs. Ruddell removed with 
her sons to California, where she maintained 
her home for a number of years. She is now 
the wife of Hon. Ambrose P. Stanton, of 
Indianapolis, of whom specific mention is 
made on other pages of this publication. 

Almus G. Ruddell received his early educa- 
tional training in the public schools of In- 
dianapolis and was fourteen years of ae-e at 
the time of his mother's removal to Califor- 
nia, where in due course of time he was matri- 
culated in Leland Stanford I^niversity. in 
which famous institution he wa« graduated 
as a member of the class of 189.'> and from 
which he received the degree of Bacheloi- of 
Arts. Two years later his brother was gradu- 
ated in the same universitv. as alreadv noted. 



Soon after his graduation Mr. Ruddell re- 
turned to Indianapolis, in June, 1895, and for 
the ensuing two years he held a position in 
the wholesale drug establishment of Ward 
Brothers. In 1899 he became associated with 
the Central Rubber & Supply Company, in 
which he is the principal stockholder and of 
which he has been president since that year. 
This concern conducts a wholesale business 
in the handling of r\ibber goods and mill sup- 
plies, and represents one of the substantial 
biLsiness enterprises of "Greater Indianap- 
olis". Mr. Ruddell is essentially alert and 
progressive as a business man and takes a 
loyal interest in all that tends to further the 
ijidustrial and civic progress of his native 
city, where he is well known and enjoys un- 
equivocal popularity. He is a member of the 
Commercial Club, is affiliated with Mystic 
Tie Lodge No. 398, Free and Accepted Ma- 
sons, and in politics he gives his allegiance 
to the Republican party. 

He was married, April 12, 1899, to Clemen- 
tine Tucker, of Newark, New Jersey, and has 
two sons. James Henry Ruddell, bom April 
19, 1903, and Warren Tucker Ruddell, born 
February 9, 1910. 

Edwin B. Ptjgh. Natural predilection, 
through preparation and zealous devotion 
have eiven Mr. Push distinctive prestige as 
one of the able members of the bar of In- 
diana and in its capital city he controls a 
large and representative practice. He served 
for two years as prosecuting attorney of Clar- 
ion County and in this office he made a most 
admirable record, materially enhancing his 
professional reputation. 

Edwin Barton Pugh was born in the City 
of Cincinnati. Ohio, on the 21st of March. 
1867, and he finds no small measure of satis- 
faction in reverting to the old Buckeye state 
as the place of his nativity, though essentially 
loyal to and appreciative of Indiana, in which 
commonwealth he has lived since his child- 
hood days. He is the third in order of birth 
of the seven children born to James B. and 
Celia M. (Lenien') Push, who still maintain 
their home in Indianapolis, secure in the es- 
teem of all who laiow them. Both were born 
and reared in Ohio and are membei-s of hon- 
ored pioneer families of that state. James 
B. Pugh, -who was lone eneaged as traveling 
salesman for wholesale hardware houses, and 
who is now livinc virtually retired, removed 
to Indianapolis when the subject of this 
sketch was about five years of ace and hn<: 
since retained his residence in this citv. He 
is .T Republican in politics and he and his wife 
bold membership in the ^Nferidian Street 
^b'thodist Episcopal Church. 



HISTOEY OF GREATER INDIA?fAPOLIS. 



Edwin B.. Pugh is indebted to the public 
schools of Indianapolis for his early educa- 
tional training', which included the currieu- 
iuiii of the high schooJ, in which he was grad- 
uated as a member of the class of 1887. He 
then entered DePauw Universitj', prosecut- 
ing his studies in the academic department 
and completing the prescribed course in the 
law department, in which he was graduated 
in ]March, 1890, with first honors of his class 
and was accorded his well earned degree of 
Bachelor of Laws. He was forth^^^th ad- 
mitted to the bar of the state and opened an 
office in the Indiana Trust building, in In- 
dianapolis, which office he has continued to 
occupy during the intervening years, which 
have been marked by most successful accom- 
plishment in his profession, which he has hon- 
ored by his able services and to which his 
devotion has been of the most unequivocal 
type. 

In politics jMr. Pugh gives an unswerving 
allegiance to the Republican party, but he 
has never held public ofiSee except that in di- 
rect line with the work of his profession. In 
1898 he was elected prosecuting attorney of 
Marion County, and he gave a most alert and 
forceful administration in conserving the 
ends of justice in bringing malefactors to 
their just deserts. He was specially active 
in the ferreting out and prosecution of offi- 
cials guilty of graft and malfeasance, and 
had the distinction of securing the first con- 
viction in the history of the county on the 
charge of bribery by a public official. Among 
others he successfully prosecuted a member 
of the city council on the charge of soliciting 
a bribe. This official was convicted and 
served a term in the penitentiary. Mr. Pugh 
has been the architect of his own fortune and 
his advancement has been gained by the hon- 
est application of his owii energies and pow- 
ers, so that he is fully deserving of the proud 
American title of self-made man. He is a 
liberal and loyal citizen, taking definite in- 
terest in all that tends to advance the welfare 
of the cit3^ and state, and he is affiliated with 
the Masonic fraternity, in which he has 
gained the thirty-second degree of the Ancient 
Accepted Scottish Rite, besides which he is 
identified with the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows and the Knights of Pythias. He and 
his wife hold membership in the Meridian 
Street Methodist Episcopal Church. 

On the 21st of June, 1899, Mr. Pugh was 
united in marriage to Miss Bonnie Beau- 
champ, daughter of Judge Robert B. Beau- 
champ, of Tipton, Indiana, a student of De- 
Pauw University, and the one child of this 
union is Caroline. 



Cyrus N. Harold, -M. D. As one of the 
able and honored representatives of the med- 
ical profession in the capital city of his na- 
tive state, where he has been engaged in ac- 
tive practice for nearly fifteen years and 
where he is president of the faculty of his 
alma mater, the Physio-Medical -Colfege, Dr. 
Harold is well entitled to consideration in 
this publication touching Indianapolis and 
its people. 

Dr. Harold was born in the village of Car- 
mel, Hamilton County, Indiana, on the 20fh 
of January, 1855, and is a son of Nathan 
and Elizabeth B. (Hawkins) Harold, the 
former of whom was born in North Carolina, 
in 1811, and the latter of whom was a native 
of Richmond, Indiana, where she was born 
in 1813. Both passed the closing years oE 
their lives in Hamilton County, this state, 
which long represented their home, and the 
father died in 1884 and the mother in 1899. 
Of their nine children eight are living, and 
of the number the subject of this review is 
the youngest. Nathan Harold came with his 
parents to Indiana in the pioneer days and 
he became one of the successful farmers and 
honored citizens of Hamilton County, 
whither he removed- from Wayne County. He 
improved in the former county, a valuable 
farm property gnd on this attractive old 
homestead, the scene of their labors for many 
years, they passed the gentle evening of their 
lives, secure in the unqualified esteem of all 
who k-new them. Both were birthright mem- 
bers of the Society of Friends, and of this 
noble and simple faith they were consistent 
exemplars during the course of their entire 
lives, marked by earnestness and by devotion 
to the good, the true and the beautiful. 
In politics the father was originally aligned 
as a supporter of the cause of the Whig 
party, but upon the organization of the Re- 
publican party he transferred his allegiance 
to the same and thereafter he continued a 
loyal supporter of its cause. He was a stanch 
abolitionist in the climacteric period leading 
up to and culminating in the War of the Re- 
bellion. 

Dr. Harold was reared under the sturdy 
discipline of the home farm, to whose work 
he early began to contribute his quota, and 
he duly availed himself of the advantages of 
the district schools, after which he continued 
his studies in the high school at Carmel, in 
which he was graduated when nineteen years 
of age. In preparing for the work of his 
chosen and exacting profession he was 
matriculated in the Physio-^Medical College 
of Indiana, at Indianapolis, in which insti 
tution he completed the prescribed course and 



HISTOKY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



was graduated as a member of the class of 
]879, with the well earned degree of Doctor 
of Medicine. He served his initiate in the 
practical work of his profession by locating 
in the village of Eagletown, Hamilton Coun- 
ty, this state, Mhere he was engaged in prac- 
tice until 1881, when he removed to Rich- 
nioud, this state, in which city he continued 
in the successful work of his chosen calling 
until September, 1895, when he came to In- 
dianapolis, where he has since been engaged 
in general practice and where he has gained 
marked prestige as a physician and surgeon 
of distinctive ability and where his clientage 
is of representative order, based alike upon 
his acknowledged skill and his personal pop- 
ularity. For some time after taking up his 
residence in the capital city the doctor was 
demonstrator of atanomy in the Physio-Med- 
ical College, later he became professor of 
phvsiologv in the institution, and he now 
holds the'chair of diseases of women in ad- 
dition to which he IS honored ?v^th the ap 
nreciative preferment nnplied in his bein 
nJesident of the faculty of this well ordered 
? 4 t,,t?,!n He is a prominent and valued 
"etler of tS IndLnapolis Physio-Medical 
^nn P V the First District Medical Society, 
H,T Indiana State Phvsio-Medical Society, 
nd tt Sonal Physio'-Medical Society. He 
Sas made valuable contributions to the peri- 
odical literature of his profession and keeps 
n close touch with the aclvances mad^ ^ ^^^^^ 
denartments of its work. He and his^^ii/ arc 
bo h r m-ent in the Society of Fn-ls^;; 
which they are birthright members and th<,v 
take an active part m the work of the local 
(.hurch of this denomination. . 

On the Uth of ^Tarch, 1878. was solemnized 
the marriaoe of Dr. Harold to Miss Ella 
?pJer who was born in Cadiz. Henry Coun- 
'rHiSna. a daughter of Ezra and Hanna 
R (Palmer) Spencer, the former ot whom 
was born in Belmont County, Ohio, and the 
anei in North Carolina. Mr. Spencer, who 
s now living virtually retired, in the state of 
Oklahoma, having attained to the venerab e 
acre of fourscore years, was engaged in mei- 
cantiie pursuits in Indiana for many years. 
Later he was for a number of years a resi- 
dent of Sumner County. Kansas, and he 
irved t«o terms as treasurer of that county, 
whence he eventually removed to Oklahomn^ 
He is a devout member of the Society of 
Friends as was also his wife, who died when 
Mrs. Harold, the elder of her two children, 
was nine years of age. To Dr. and :^rrs. Har- 
old were born two children, the elder of 
whom. Charles 0., died in infancy; Lura B. 



is now the wife of Cleo L. Hunt, and they 
reside in Brownsburg, Indiana. 

Charles ^Iayer. This weU known and 
honored business man of Indianapolis is a 
member of a family whose name has been 
long and prominently identified with business 
and civic interests in the capital city of In- 
diana, and he is now one of the interested 
principals in the finn of Charles I\layer & 
Company, proprietors of the "Gift Store", 
which is one of the leading department stores 
of the city, and which controls a large and 
substantial trade. The enterprise was 
founded in 1840 by the father of him whose 
name initiates this sketch, and the same has 
been continued without interruption and with 
ever increasing success. Charles Maj^er has 
personally achieved a position as one of the 
representative business men, and leal and 
loyal citizens of his native city, where he has 
a secure place in the confidence and esteem 
of the community. In business he is asso- 
ciated with his brother, Ferdinand L., of 
whom specific mention is made on other 
pages of this work, together with a brief re- 
vie^v of the family history and a record con- 
cerning the upbuilding of the fine business 
enterprise with which the subject of this 
article has been identified from his youth to 
the present time. In this connection refer- 
ence .should be made to the sketch of the 
career of the elder brother, Ferdinand L. 

Charles ]\Iayer was born in Indianapolis, 
on the 6th of June, 1862, and is a son of 
Charles and Matilda L. (Lempp) Mayer, of 
whom further mention is made in the sketch 
to which reference has just been made. Mr. 
Mayer secured his early education in In- 
dianapolis, under the effective direction of 
?»Irs. Gretty Holliday and Mrs. E. J. Price. 
Later he attended a school at Prangis, 
Switzerland, on the shores of beautiful Lake 
Geneva, and after his return to the United 
States he continued his studies in Greylock 
Institute, at South Williamstown, Massachu- 
setts. After leaving school he became iden- 
tified with the retail mercantile business 
which his father had established many years 
previously, and the present firm of Charles 
flayer & Company, perpetuating the nam*^ 
of the honored father, occupies the same site, 
on AVashington street, on which the father 
began business in 1840. as one of the early 
merchants and highly honored citizens of the 
capital city, which was then a mere village. 
The east sixteen feet of land occupied by the 
present fine establishment of the firm was 
purchased by Charles Mayer, Sr.. for a con- 
sideration of only si.xteen hundred dollars, 
and the property, in the very heart of the 



'•^ ^^^^ 




HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



807 



city, is now worth thousands of dollars. After 
the death of the father, in 1891, the sons 
Ferdinand L. and Charles assumed control 
and active management of the business, which 
has since been continued by them with ever 
increasing success. They have added ma- 
terially to the prestige of the name which 
they bear and obsei-ve the same integrity and 
fairness that have characterized the conduct 
of the business from the time of its inception, 
nearly seventy years ago. It is needless to 
say that the scope of the enterprise has been 
changed with the demands of the passing 
years and that to-day the establishment of the 
company is one of essentially metropolitan 
fadlities and appointments. Both of the 
brothers were carefully trained in business 
and both are notable for broad and practical 
views and progressive ideas in connection 
with business affairs and also in association 
with the responsibilities and demands of citi- 
zenship. 

Charles Mayer is enterprising and loyal as 
a citizen and has ever shown a deep interest 
in all that concerns the advancement of his 
native city, so that he has not failed to con- 
tribute his quota to the development and up- 
building of the "Greater Indianapolis", the 
beautiful city of culture and refinement, the 
alert and vital commercial and industrial 
center. In politics he is a stanch advocate of 
the cause of the Republican party, but he has 
never been ambitious for public oflBce, pre- 
ferring to devote his time and attention to 
business affairs and to specific efforts alon^ 
other lines conserving the welfare of his home 
city and state. He is a popular figure in the 
social life of Indianapolis, where he is ac- 
tively identified with representative fraternal 
and civic organizations. In the Masonic 
fraternity his affiliations are here noted: 
Mystic Tie Lodge No. 398, Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons; Keystone Chapter No. 6, 
Royal Arch Masons ; Raper Commandery No. 
1, Knights Templar; Indiana Sovereign Con- 
sistory of the Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite, 
in which he has attained the thirty-second 
degree; and Murat Temple, Ancient Arabic 
Order of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. 
Among the other noteworthy organizations 
with which Mr. Mayer is identified may be 
mentioned the Columbia and Commercial 
Clubs, the German House, the Indianapolis 
Maennerchor, the Highland Golf Club, the 
University Club and the Country Club. 

On the 28th of April, 1886, Mr. Mayer was 
united in marriage to Miss Josephine Kiefer, 
who was bom at Edenbure, Indiana, on the 
13th of October. 1863, and who is the eldest 
of the three children bom to Augustus and 



Martha (Shipp) Kiefer. Her father was 
born in Germany, in the year 1828, and in 
1838, when but ten years of age, he came 
with his parents to America, making the long 
and weary voyage on a sailing vessel of the 
type common to that period. For some time 
the family home was at Miamisburg, Ohio, 
and after attaining years of maturity Mr. 
Kiefer took up his abode in Edenburg, In- 
diana, where he continued to reside until 
1863, when he removed to Indianapolis, where 
he engaged in the wholesale drug business, un- 
der "the firm name of Vinton & Kiefer. He has 
continued to be identified with this line of 
enterprise during the long intervening years 
and is now one of the prominent and influen- 
tial business men and most highly honored 
citizens of Indianapolis, where he is head of 
the wholesale drug house conducted under 
title of the A. Kiefer Dmg Company. Indi- 
vidual mention is made of Mr. Kiefer on 
other pages of this work. Mr. and Mrs. 
Mayer have three children, Charles, Jr., Au- 
gustus Kiefer, and Edward L. 

Fra-vk Erdei,meyer. The great Empire 
of Germany has contributed a most valuable 
element to the complex social fabric of our 
American Republic and from this source we 
have had much to gain and nothing to lose. 
A distinguished representative of German- 
American citizenship in Indianapolis is Col- 
onel Frank Erdelmeyer, who has here main- 
tained his home for more than half a cen- 
tury, who has been prominently identified 
with business interests of important order 
and to whom it was given to render particu- 
larly distinguished services as a soldier of his 
adopted country in the War of the Rebellion. 
No citizen, maintains or is deserving of a 
higher measure of popular confidence and es- 
teem and he is still actively identified with 
mercantile interests as the owner of one of 
the leading retail drug establishments of the 
city, the same being located at 915 North 
New Jersey Street. 

Colonel Erdelmeyer was born at Herrn- 
sheim. near the City of Worms, Germany, on 
the 2nd of November, 1835, and is a son of 
Phillip and Elizabeth (Tag") Erdelmeyer, 
both of whom passed their entire lives in 
Germany, where the father devoted the ma- 
jor portion of his active career to keeping 
a hotel. The colonel gained his early educa- 
tion in the excellent schools of his father- 
land and served a thorough apprenticeship at 
the trade of upholsterer. When he had at- 
tained to the age of seventeen years his fa- 
ther gave him the privilege either of emi- 
grating to America or remaining in his na- 
tive land where it would be necessary under 



HISTOEY OF GKEATEB INDIANAPOLIS. 



the governmental laws for him to enter the 
German army for a certain period of active 
service, at the conclusion of which the au- 
thorities would not permit his removal to 
America. Under these conditions the ambi- 
tious young man determined to seek his for- 
tune in the new world and in 1852 he sev- 
ered the gracious ties which bound him to 
home and fatherland and set forth for Amer- 
ica. After his arrival in the port of New 
York, he soon found employment at his trade, 
to which he continued to devote his attention 
in the old Empire state about three years, 
at the expiration of which he started for the 
West, finally locating in the city of Cincin- 
nati, where he remained one year. He came 
to Indianapolis in 1858 and this city has rep- 
resented his home during the long interven- 
ing years. Soon after his arrival in the In- 
diana capital he secured employment in the 
establishment of John Ott, a well known 
furniture manufacturer, by whom he contin- 
ued to be employed at his trade until the in- 
ception of the Civil War, when he showed his 
distinctive loyalty to the cause of the Union 
by tendering his services in its defense. He 
was at the time a member of the Indianapolis 
Turnverein and with many other of these 
members he enlisted. April 21, 1861, as a pri- 
vate in the Eleventh Indiana Volunteer In- 
fantry, of which the late General Lew Wal- 
lace became colonel. In this regiment Col- 
onel Erdelmeyer was a member of Company 
E and upon the formaF organization of the 
company he was made a sergeant of the same, 
retaining this office until the expiration of 
the regiment's three month's term of enlist- 
ment, when he received his honorable dis- 
charge. He then returned to Indianapolis 
and assisted in recruiting a German regiment, 
a plan which had been successfully followed 
prior to this in the city of Cincinnati. This 
organization was made up entirely of Ger- 
man citizens of Indianapolis and other towns 
of the state and was mustered into United 
States service as the Thirty-second Indiana 
Volunteer Infantry. Colonel Erdelmeyer was 
made captain of Company A and while re- 
taining this position he participated with his 
regiment in the battle at Rowlett's Station, 
near Green River, Kentucky; the memorable 
battle of Shiloh; and the siege of Corinth. 
On the 20th of October, 1862, Captain Erdel- 
meyer was promoted to the rank of lieutenant- 
colonel and on the 8th of August of the fol- 
lowing year he received full commission as 
colonel. He had command of his regiment 
from October 1, 1862, until is was mustered 
out at the close of its three years' term of en- 
li'^tment. He gained high reputation as a 



gallant, faithful and able commanding offi- 
cer, ever retaining the respect and confidence 
of his men and showing generous considera- 
tion in providing for their wants. His regi- 
ment was prominently concerned in the bat- 
tle of Stone's River and Liberty Gap, and 
the battle of Chickamauga and Missionary 
Ridge. His regiment marched to the relief 
of the Union forces at Knoxville, Tennessee, 
and afterward joined General Sherman in the 
Atlanta campaign, in connection with which 
Mr. Erdelmeyer took" part in the battles of 
Dalton, Resaca, Dallas, Altoona Hills, New 
Hope Church, Marietta and the siege of At- 
lanta. In front of Atlanta the Thirty-sec- 
ond Infantry under command of Colonel 
Erdelmeyer was relieved of duty and was 
sent home to be mustered out, as its term of 
enlistment had expired on the 24th of Aug- 
ust, J864. Its members returned to their 
homes and the honored colonel of the regi- 
ment received his honorable discliarge under 
date of September 7, 1864. The record of its 
command was admirable throughout and the 
history of the war gives it a place among 
the most valiant of the many stanch and 
valiant regiments sent out from Indiana. It 
was especially well ordered in the matter of 
tactical skill and discipline and its colonel 
achieved a reputation as one of the able com- 
manding officers of the great war through 
whose integrity the Union was perpetuated. 
He has ever retained an inviolable interest in 
his old comrades in arms and signifies the 
same by his membership in G. H. Thomas 
Post, No. 17, Grand Army of the Republic, 
besides which he is a valued member of the 
Indiana Commandery of the Military Order 
of the Loyal Legion of the United States. 

At the close of his long and gallant service 
as a soldier of the Republic, Colonel Erdel- 
meyer returned to Indianapolis and agaiil 
turned himself to the gaining of those vic- 
tories which peace ever has in store "no less 
renowned than war". Here he engaged in 
the drug business as a member of the firm 
of A. Metzner & Company, in which he thus 
became an interested principal in January, 
1865, and in which his coadjutor was Cap- 
tain Adolph Metzner. In 1868 Colonel Er- 
delmeyer purchased his partner's interest in 
the enterprise and thereafter he, conducted 
the same in an individual way until 1873, 
when he sold the business. For a short pe- 
riod thereafter he gave his attention to deal- 
ing in real estate and he then resumed his 
association with the drug business by opening 
a store at 915 North New Jersey street, at 
which location he has been continuously en- 
gaged in this line of enterprise during the 



HISTOKY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



809 



lonu' years that have siuce passed. He is 
known as one of the reliable and substantial 
business men of the capital city and as such 
he commands the implicit confidence and es- 
teem of all who know him, while to him is 
accorded a full measure of respect and ad- 
miration by those who are in the least fa- 
miliar with his brilliant career as a soldier 
and otifieer in the Civil War. He has shown 
a lively interest in all that pertains to the 
welfare of his home city and has viewed with 
much of satisfaction the almost phenomenal 
advancement of the city along commercial 
and industrial lines. 

While ever according a stanch allegiance to 
the Republican party, Colonel Erdelmeyer 
had not been especially active in the domain 
of "practical polities" and the only public 
office in which he has served is that of coun- 
ty treasurer of Marion County, of which he 
was incumbent for one term, having been 
elected to this office in 1868. The records of 
the county give unmistakable evidence that 
his administration of the fiscal affairs of the 
county was one of marked discrimination and 
eft'ectiveness. The colonel is identified with 
the ^Masonic fraternity, in which his affilia- 
tion is with Centre Lodge, No. 23, Free and 
Accepted Masons, and he is a member of the 
German House, and the Indianapolis Turn- 
verein. 

In October, 1864, was solemnized the mar- 
riage of Colonel Erdelmeyer to Miss Cathe- 
rine Hofmann, who was born in Germany and 
who was a daughter of Henry and Catherine 
(Lang) Hofmann. She proved a devoted 
companion and helpmate and the home life 
was one of idyllic order. The great loss and 
bereavement in the life of Colonel Erdelmeyer 
was that which came with the death of his 
wife, on the 7th of October, 1887. Of this 
union were born one son and three daughters : 
Prancisca, who is now the wife of Louis F. 
Buschmann, a resident of this city; Cathe- 
rine, who is the wife of E. H. Meyer, a resi- 
dent of this city; Meta, who is the wife of 
E. H. Dehm, of this city; and Frank Wil- 
liam, who is engaged in the drug business at 
1102 North Illinois street. 

Sol S. Kiser is a prominent business man 
and financier of Indianapolis, who is a mem- 
ber of the banking firm of Mj'er and Kiser. 
Born at Fort Recovery, Ohio, on the 23rd of 
January. 1858, he is a son of Gottlieb and 
Fannie (Steinfeld") Kiser, both of whom are 
natives of Hesse-Cassel. The father was born 
November 26, 1831, and the mother, January 
13, 1833, their marriage, at Cincinnati, Ohio, 
occurring August 26, 1854. The seven chil- 
dren of this union were as follows : Caro- 



line; Sol S., of this sketch; Frances, now the 
wife of Eli Segar; Simon L., Harter; Rosa, 
who married George A. Solomans, and Dr. 
Edgar F. Kiser. The parents are both resi- 
dents of Indianapolis, in which city Gottlieb 
Kiser was long engaged in the grocery busi- 
ness, from which he retired in 1905. 

Mr. Kiser of this sketch received his edu- 
cation in the public schools of Fort Recovery, 
leaving Ohio in 1878, just before he had 
reached his majority," and locating in Union 
City, Indiana, where he engaged in clerical 
work for about three years. The year 1881 
marked his location at Indianapolis and he 
clerked in a clothing store uiitil 1886, when 
he established his mercantile business on 
West Washington street. In 1894 he entered 
the field of real estate and loaning in the 
firm of Myer & Kiser, which in April, 1906, 
was incorporated as the Myer-Kiser Bank 
and of which he is vice-president. His prom- 
inent and honorable standing in local busi- 
ness circles is fairly indicated by the fact 
that for the past nine years he has been a 
director in the Indianapolis Commercial Club, 
of which he was vice-president for two years. 
Jlr. Kiser is among the foremost in the re- 
ligious, benevolent and charitable work of his 
people. Since 1895 he has been a most ac- 
tive member o5 the Jewish order of B'nai 
B'rith, having been president of the district 
organization in 1897. He is local director 
of the Cleveland Jewish Orphan Asylum ; di- 
rector of the National Jewish Hospital for 
Consumptives at Denver, Colorado, and chair- 
man of the local branch of the removal com- 
mittee of New York City. 

On June 19, 1889, Mr. Kiser married Miss 
Dina Salzenstein. His wife is a native of 
Pleasant Plains, Illinois, and a daughter of 
Jacob and Hannah (Hexter) Salzenstein, 
both of whom were born in Hesse-Cassel, Ger- 
many. Mr. and Mrs. Sol S. Kiser are the 
parents of Julian J. and Ruth C. 

Allen W. Conduitt. A thoroughlj- rep- 
resentative business man and sterling citizen 
of Indianapolis is Allen W. Conduitt. who is 
a native son of the Hoosier state and a seiim 
of one of its honored pioneer families. Like 
his father before him, he has been promi- 
nently identified with business affairs of 
broad scope and importance and he has ever 
stood exponent of progressive, liberal and 
public-spirited citizenship. 

Mr. Conduitt was born at Mooresville, Mor- 
gan County, Indiana, on the 28th of August, 
1849, and is a son of Alexander B. and Me- 
lissa R. (^Hardwick) Conduit, both of whom 
were born in Kentucky and both of whom 
represented old Virginia families of English 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



origin. From Kentucky the Conduitts and 
Hardwicks removed to Indiana in the pioneer 
epoch of the history of this commonwealth, 
with whose annals the names have long been 
identified. Alexander B. Conduitt was a boy 
at the time of the family removal from Ken- 
tucky to Morgan County, Indiana, in whose 
pioneer schools he gained excellent training in 
the fundamental branches of scholarship. As 
a youth he was employed as clerk in the gen- 
eral store of Samuel Moore, the founder of 
Mooresville, Indiana. Finally he became as- 
sociated with his brothers in purchasing . the 
store and business of Mr. Moore, and he de- 
voted his attention to business with so much 
of assiduity that his health became seriously 
impaired, under which conditions he disposed 
of his mercantile interests, through ^hich he 
had gained a very gratifying measure of suc- 
cess. He had in the meanwhile become the 
owner of farming land in Morgan County, 
and for the next several years he gave his 
active attention to agricultural pursuits. The 
outdoor life enabled him to fully regain his 
physical vigor, and he thus felt justified in 
again turning his attention to business af- 
fairs of a commercial order. Accordingly, 
in 1864, he removed with his family to In- 
dianapolis, where he identified himself with 
the wholesale dry goods business, in which 
he became associated with Willis S. Webb, 
Captain W. H. Tarkington, and Frank Lan- 
ders, under the firm name of Webb, Tarking- 
ton & Company. After the withdrawal of 
Mr. Webb the title became Landers, Con- 
duitt & Company. Still later Mr. Conduitt 
withdrew from the business, to which the 
present firm of Hibben, Hollweg & Company 
is virtually the lineal successor. In 1870 
Alexander B. Conduitt engaged in the whole- 
sale grocery trade, as a member of the firm 
of Conduitt, Daugherty & Company. There 
were various changes in the personnel of the 
concern and in 1875 the subject of this re- 
view became associated with his father in 
the business, whereupon the title of Conduitt 
& Son was adopted. They conducted a large 
and prosperous business until 1893, when 
they sold the same, being succeeded by the 
firm of SchuuU & Company. For the ensuing 
decade Alexander B. Conduitt was retired 
from active business, and he died in July, 
1903, when nearly eighty-five years of age. 

In his earlier years Alexander B. Conduitt 
had figured prominently in public affairs in 
the state, having been a leader in the coun- 
cils of the Democratic party in Indiana. He 
was a member of the state constitutional con- 
vention of 1852. later served two terms as 
rc'i>resentative of Morsran County in the state 



legislature, and in 1862 he was the nominee 
of his party for jepresentative in Congress 
from his district : though he entered the race 
in opposition to a heavy Republican majority, 
he ran far ahead of is ticket and missed 
election by a merely nominal majority. He 
was an able business man, a public-spirited 
citizen and his life was lived upon the lofti- 
est plane of integrity and honor, so that he 
ever held as his own the unqualified confi- 
dence and respect of his. fellow men. His 
cherished and devoted wife preceded him to 
the life eternal, her death having occurred in 
1898, at which time she was eighty years of 
age. Both were affiliated with the Methodist 
Church. Of their nine children seven at- 
tained to years of maturity, and of the num- 
ber two sons and two daughters are now liv- 
ing. 

Allen W. Conduitt, whose name initiates 
this article, secured his preliminary educa- 
tional discipline in the common schools of 
Morgan County and was sixteen years of age 
at the time of the family removal to Indian- 
apolis. He thereafter continued his studies 
for two years in the old Northwestern Chris- 
tian University, now Butler College, at Irv- 
ington, this state, and upon leaving this in- 
stitution he secured employment in the whole- 
sale dry goods establishment in which his fa- 
ther was an interested principal. He was 
thus engaged for two years, at the expira- 
tion of which, in the latter part of the year 
1868, he became associated with his brother 
Henry in the general merchandise business at 
Switz City, Indiana, from which place they 
later transferred their headquarters to 
Mooresville, their native town. In 1875 Allen 
W. disposed of his interest and returned to 
Indianapolis, where he became junior member 
of the wholesale grocery firm of Conduitt & 
Son, with which he thus continued until 1893, 
as has been noted in a preceding paragraph. 
For a time thereafter Mr. Conduitt gave his 
attention to contracting for street-improve- 
ment work, and in 1903 he engaged in the 
wholesale coal business, with which he has 
since been prominently identified, as an in- 
terested principal in the Cochrane Coal Com- 
pany. He was also one of the organizers and 
incorporators of the Conduitt Automobile 
Company, engaged in the sale of high grade 
automobiles in Indianapolis. He is well 
known as an aggressive and substantial busi- 
ness man and as a citizen of the utmost pub- 
lic spirit, taking a deep concern in all that 
n;akes for the civic and material progress 
and prosperity of his home city. 

In politics Mr. Conduitt has ever accorded 
ii stanch allegiance to the Democratic part}'. 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



811 



and while he has not been ambitious foi- pub- 
lie -office of any order, he had the distinction 
of being chosen president of the Indianapolis 
board of public works at the time of its 
initiation, under the law creating this depart- 
ment of the municipal government. He re- 
tained the office under the administration of 
Mayor Thomas L. Sullivan and had much to 
do with shaping and defining the policies un- 
der which this department has continued to 
afford so effective service. He has long been 
affiliated with the time-honored Masonic fra- 
ternity, in which he has completed the round 
of the York and Scottish Rites, having his 
maximum affiliation in the former as a mem- 
ber of Raper Commandery No. 1, Knights 
Templar, and in the latter having attained to 
the thirty-second degree in the Consistory of 
the Valley of Indianapolis. He is also iden- 
tified with Murat Temple, Ancient Arabic Or- 
der of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He is 
a charter member of the Commercial Club 
and is actively identified with its affairs, 
having been the first to be elected vice-presi- 
dent of this representative organization, 
which stands sponsor for the highest civic 
ideals. Mr. and Mrs. Conduitt are members 
of St. Paul's Episcopal Church. 

On the 11th of January, 1870, Mr. Con- 
duitt was united in marriage to Miss Eliza- 
beth Thornburg, who was born and reared in 
Morgan County, this state, and who is a 
daughter of the late John H. Thornburg, a 
successful farmer and honored citizen of that 
section of the state. Mr. and Mrs. Conduitt 
have two children— Mabel, who is the wife of 
John A. Boyd, and Harold A., who is en- 
gaged in the real estate business in Los An- 
geles, California. 

WiNFiEi.D MiT.LER was bom, in Reading 
Pennsylvania, April 23, 1852. He is the son 
of John M. Miller and Anna E. (Swartz- 
welder) Miller, the former born of English 
and Welsh ancestry in Berks County, Penn- 
sylvania, and the latter of German and 
Scotch parentage in Lancaster County, Penn- 
sylvania, both coming from pioneer families 
of that state. 

Winfield Miller is one of seven children, 
and one of the four now living, the others 
being: Scott, who is a resident of Livingston 
County, Missouri ; Rosa V.. who remains at 
the parental home near Braymer, Missouri, 
and Anna Evlyn, who is the wife of Eli T. 
Messenbaugh, of Braymer, Missouri. 

John M. Miller, father of him whose name 
initiates this review, was reared to manhood 
in Pennsylvania, where he received a com- 
mon school education and where he learned in 
his youth the trade of carpenter and joiner. 



to which he devoted his attention for a num- 
ber of years, though after his removal to the 
West he became successfully identified with 
agricultural pursuits. In 1855 he removed 
with his family to Ogle County, Illinois, 
where he remained one year, at the expiration 
of which he took up his residence in Decorah, 
Iowa, which continued to be the abiding place 
of the family until April, 1865, when they 
removed to Caldwell County, Missouri, mak- 
ing the jounney overland with teams. John 
M. Miller secured land and developed one of 
the valuable farms of that county where he 
ha.s long been knoavn as a citizen of promi- 
nence and influence and where he has ever 
commanded unqualified confidence and 
esteem. He has wielded no little influence 
in public affairs of a local order, and has 
been itJentified with the Republican party 
from the time of its organization, having 
voted for its first presidential candidate, John 
C. Fremont, prior to which tiine he was 
aligned as a supporter of the cause of the 
wing party. In his early day he affiliated 
with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
and has been a mernber of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church for sixty-five years. His 
cherished and devoted wife departed this life 
January 25, 1904. 

The subject of this sketch was four years 
old when his paVents removed to Decorah, 
Iowa. He received his early-education in the 
schools of that place, attending school little 
after the age of thirteen, at which age he 
went with his parents to the State of Mis- 
souri, where he entered into the work and 
experience of a farmer's son. At the age of 
seventeen' he becaine a successful teacher in 
the district schools of Caldwell and adjoin- 
ing counties, and later, at the age of twenty- 
four, became assistant principal in the high 
school of Hamilton, Missouri, teaching in 
that school for two years, after which he took 
up the study of law at Kingston, the county 
seat of Caldwell County, Missouri. 

In November, 1878, he was elected Clerk 
Df the Circuit Court and Ex-Offieio Recorder 
of Deeds for the county. At the expiration 
of his first term in 1882 he was re-elected, 
holding the position for two full terms. In 
January, 1884, he was admitted to practice 
law in the courts of Missouri. From 1884 to 
1886 Mr. Miller was associated with the 
financial correspondent, at St. Louis, Missouri, 
of The Connecticut Mutual Life Insurance 
Company in the farm loan business in the 
State of Missouri. In this connection he vis- 
ited forty-five counties, making reports of the 
soils, values and topography of the several 
sections coming under his observation. In 



815 



HISTOEY OF GKEATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



Jul}', 1888, at Hamilton, Missouri, he eutered 
the employ of The Connecticut Mutual Lif.; 
Insurance Company, in whose interests he 
traveled throughout Missouri, Illinois, Iowa, 
Nebraska, Ohio and Indiana in the capacity 
of special agent. In connection with this 
work he visited twenty-two counties in north- 
western Ohio in 1888, and in June, 1899, per- 
manently located in Indianapolis as the 
financial correspondent of the company for 
Ohio and Indiana, which position he con- 
tinued to hold for twenty-one years. 

Aside from his extensive travels in a busi- 
ness way, Mr. Miller has made numerous 
trips of interest and profit while in search 
of recreation. He has distinctive versatility 
as a descriptive writer and in the Indianapo- 
lis Journal of Sunday, October 27, 1901, ap- 
peared an article from his pen describing 
most efi:eetively a trip through the Rocky 
Mountains and the Yellowstone National 
Park. 

In politics, Mr. Miller has adhered to the 
Republican party, in -whose cause he has done 
effective service. He served as a member of 
the Republican State Central Committee of 
Missouri and Secretary of two state conven- 
tions of his party in that state. 

Mr. Miller is one of the popular business 
men of Indianapolis, and this is signified by 
his membership in the Columbia Club, the 
Century Club and the Commercial Club, of 
which last organization he was elected presi- 
dent in February, 1910. He is a member of 
the Meridian Street Methodist Episcopal 
Church. At Kingston, Missouri, he was af- 
filiated with Kingston Lodge No. 118, Free 
and Accepted Masons, of which he is the 
past master, and at Hamilton, Missouri, was 
a member of Hamilton Chapter, Royal Arch 
Masons, of which he is past high priest. 

Mr. Miller has been married twice, first to 
Miss Edith Elizabeth Filbey, at Chillicothe, 
Missouri, in October, 1880, who died March 
14, 1895. He was married to Miss Lillie B. 
Landers on February 7, 1900. From the first 
marriage two sons were born, Blaine H. 
Miller, August 14, 1881, and Winfield C. 
Miller, December 7, 1884. Blaine H. Mil}er 
was city civil engineer of Indianapolis, In- 
diana, for the four years beginning Janiiary 
1, 1906. 

RoscoE C. Jessup. As senior member of 
the firm of Jessup & Antrim, engaged in the 
creamery business in Indianapolis, Mr. Jes- 
sup is numbered among the aggressive and 
enterprising business men and loyal and pub- 
lic-spirited citizens of the capital city and he 
is a native son of the county in which he now 
maintains his home. He was born in Decatur 



Township, Marion County, Indiana, on the 
12th of April, 1862, and is a son of Jacks(5n 
L. and Malinda (Kellum) Jessup, both of 
whom are now deceased. The father was 
born in North Carolina and was the scion of 
sterling Quaker stock, his parents having 
been devoted members of the Society of 
Friends. When he was three years of age the 
family removed to Indiana and his father, 
Joseph Jessup, became one of the early set- 
tlers of Hendricks County, locating near the 
Marion and Morgan County line. There 
Jackson L. Jessup was reared to maturity 
and his active career was one of close iden- 
tification with agricultural pursuits. He was 
also a communist of the Society of- Friends, 
of which he was a birthright member. His 
wife was a native of Hendricks County, this 
state. Her father, Jesse Kellum, was a pio- 
neer settler, having come hither from North 
Carolina, and he likewise was a member of 
the Society of Friends. Jackson L. and Ma- 
linda (Kellum) Jessup became the parents of 
seven children, concerning whom the follow- 
ing brief data are incorporated: Amanda, 
who became the wife of John Chawner, is 
now deceased; Oswald is engaged in the 
creamery business in Indianapolis ; Sarah died 
in infancy and Orlando also is deceased; 
Kellum resides at West Liberty, Illinois ; Ros- 
coe C, the immediate subject of this review, 
was next in order of birth, and Cora Clifton 
is now the wife of John Q. Hitch, of Cham- 
paign, Illinois. The father died in 1890 at 
the age of seventy-eight years and the mother 
was of the same age at the time of her death, 
which occurred in 1905. 

Roscoe C. Jessup was reared with the 
sturdy discipline of the home farm and was 
afl'orded the advantages of the public schools 
of his native county. He continued to be 
associated in the work and management of 
the home farm until he was twentj'-five years 
of age when he went to the state of Illinois 
where he gained his initial experience with 
the creamery business. In 1889 Mr. Jessup 
came to Indianapolis, where he was employed 
in connection with the creamery business of 
R. W. Furnas for a period of about eight 
years. In 1897 he associated himself with 
A. W. Antrim and formed the present part- 
nership, under the title of Jessup & Antrim. 
The firm purchased a small creamery plant 
business and with the passing of years the 
enterprise has grown into one of much scope 
and importance. In 1904 the firm erected its 
present modern and substantial brick build- 
ing at 713-15 North Illinois street, Indian- 
apolis. 

In politics Mr. Jessup gives his allegiance 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



813 



to the Republican party and both he and his 
wife hold membership in the Society of 
Friends. 

In 1894 was solemnized the marriage of 
Mr. Jessup to Miss Ella Haines and she was 
summoned to the life eternal in 1901, being 
survived by one child, Dorothy C. lu 1907 
Mr. Jessup wedded Mrs. Wilma J. (Wilson) 
Spray, no children having been born of this 
union. 

Horace F. Wood. A native of Indiana's 
capital city and numbered among its sub- 
stantial and popular business men is Horace 
F. Wood, who conducts a finely equipped liv- 
ery establishment at 45-7 Monument place. 
Particular interest attaches to his connection 
with this line of enterprise from the fact that 
with the same both his father and grandfa- 
ther were identified, and the business has 
been consecutively continued through three 
generations. Mi-. AVood was born in the old 
family homestead at the corner of Massachu- 
setts avenue and Pennsylvania street, Indian- 
apolis, on the 30th of August, 1857, and is 
a son of John M. and Margaret A. (Gres- 
ham) Wood. His father was born at Mays- 
ville, Kentucky, in 1815, and was reared to 
maturity in that state, whence he came with 
his parents to Indianapolis in 1832. Here he 
attained to prestige as a representative busi- 
ness man and loyal, and progressive citizen, 
ever commanding a secure place in the con- 
iidenee and esteem of the community. He 
died in March, 1896. He was the son of John 
Wood, who likewise was a native of Kentucky 
and a representative of one of the old and 
honored families of the Bluegrass state. John 
Wood was an extensive dealer in horses at 
Maysville, Kentucky, shipping his stock prin- 
cipally to southern points and being a pioneer 
in this line of enterprise. He was the first 
to drive horses from that section to the city 
of New Orleans before the day of railroads 
or steamboats, and his son. John M., made 
fifteen trips on horseback to New Orleans be- 
fore he was twelve years of age. After com- 
ing to Indianapolis John Wood engaged in 
the liverj' business in the same location now 
utilized by his grandson, of this sketch, and 
he also operated a stage line between this 
city and Richmond, Indiana, in the '40s. Be- 
fore his death his son, John M., succeeded 
him in the livery business and the latter was 
in turn succeeded by Horace F. Wood, whose 
name initiates this sketch. John Wood died 
in this city in the year 1846, at his old home- 
stead on the corner of Virginia avenue and 
Alabama street, the residence being located 
on a large tract of land that is now occupied 
by a large number of houses and. business 



buildings. John 'SI. Wood was married in 
Indianapolis to Miss jMargaret A. Gresham, 
vvho was born and reared in Frankfort, Ken- 
tucky, and they established their home in a 
log cabin located on the site of the present 
office of the livery establishment of their son, 
Horace F. Their wedded life was of an ideal 
order and, continuing for a period of over 
half a century, they celebrated their golden 
wedding. Both of them passed away in the 
year 1896, their home at the time having been 
on the site "of the present Young Women's 
Christian Association building on North 
Pennsj'lvania street. They were popular fig- 
ures in connection with the social activities 
of the city in the early days and their circle 
of friends was coincident with that of their 
acquaintances. At their little log homestead 
on the present Monument place was enter- 
tained one of the early governors of Indiana, 
who was there accorded a public reception. 
John M. and Margaret A. (Gresham) WoO'l 
became the parents of eight children, namely: 
Belle, who is now the wife of Thomas G. 
Barry, of Indianapolis; Frances, who is the 
widow of Lewis Morrison ; Charles H., who 
is engaged in the livery business in Indian- 
apolis; Horace F., whose name initiates this 
sketch: Frank G., who is engaged with the 
Atlas Paper Company at Indianapolis; and 
Harry, Mary and John, who are deceased. 
The father continued to be actively identi- 
fied with the livery business until 1880, when 
he was succeeded by his son, Horace F., who 
has since conducted the enterprise and who 
controls a large and representative business. 
Horace F. Wood is indebted to the public 
schools of Indianapolis for his early educa- 
tional discipline, which included a course in 
the high school and his entire business career 
has been one of active identification with the 
livery business. He is one of the loyal, prog- 
ressive, public-spirited business men of his 
native city, where he enjoys unequivocal con- 
fidence and esteem. He is affiliated with the 
time-honored Masonic fraternity, in which he 
has attained to the thirty-third ultimate de- 
gree of the Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite. 
His maximum affiliation, the York Rite, is 
with Raper Commandery, Knights Templar, 
and he also holds membership in Murat Tem- 
ple. Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles of 
the Mystic Shrine, of which he was a director 
for a period of fourteen years. He is one of 
the prominent and valued members of the Co- 
lumbia Club, in which he .served as secretary 
for three years, and he is also a member of 
the German House, the Country Club and the 
Canoe Club. In politics, while never seek- 
ing official preferment, he is a stanch sup- 



81- 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



porter of the principles and policies for which 
the Republican party stands sponsor. 

On November 7, 1884, was solemnized the 
marriage of Mr. Wood to ]\Iiss Rose Gra- 
ham, who was born and reared in Indianap- 
olis and who is a daughter of Benjamin M. 
and Margaret Ann (Beach) Graham. The 
one child of this marriage is John G., who 
is associated with the Empire Motor Gar Com- 
pany. 

Samuel E. Rauh. One of the valued and 
loyal citizens contributed to the Indiana capi- 
tal by the great empire of Germany is Sam- 
uel Elias Rauh, who is to-day numbered 
among the most prominent and influential 
business men of Indianapolis, where his capi- 
talistic interests are large and varied and 
where he may well find classification among 
those valiant "captains of industry" through 
whose eiforts has come the magnificent com-. 
mercial and civic progress of the city within 
the past decade and a half. 

Mr. Rauh was born in the kingdom of Ba- 
varia, Germany, on the 21st of December, 
18.53, and is a son of Elias and Hannah 
(Abrahams') Rauh, both likewise natives of 
Bavaria, with whose annals the respective 
names have been identified for many genera- 
tions. In 1866 Elias Rauh immigrated with 
his family to America, landing in the port 
of New York City and soon afterward mak- 
ing his way to Ohio. He established his 
home in Dayton, that state, where he engaged 
in the fur and hide business, in which he 
built np a large and successful enterprise, be- 
coming one of the substantial citizens and in- 
fluential men of Dayton, where he continued 
to reside until his death, at the age of sixty- 
nine years. His devoted wife was sixty-five 
years of age at the time of her demise, and 
both were zealous in the work and support 
of the Hebrew church, representing the faith 
of their forefathers. Of their ten children 
the subject of this sketch was the fourth in 
order of birth and of the number eight are 
now living. Elias Rauh was a stanch Demo- 
crat in his political proclivities and while 
signally loyal to all the duties and responsi- 
bilities of citizenship he had naught of am- 
bition for public office. 

Samuel E. Rauh. whose name introduces 
this article, secured his rudimentary educa- 
tion in the excellent schools of his native land 
and was a lad" of thirteen years at the time 
of the family immigration to the United 
States. He was reared to maturity in Day- 
ton, Ohio, where he was afforded the advan- 
tages of the public schools and of a well or 
dered commercial collese. He early became 
associated with the details of his father's 



business, in connection with which he re- 
ceived a thorough training and well fitted 
himself for independent operations as a busi- 
ness man of broad capacity and distinctive 
initiative power. He continued his residence 
in Dayton until 1874, when he removed to 
Indianapolis and here engaged in the hide 
and pelt business, in which he successfully 
continued for nearly twenty years, having re- 
tired from this field of enterprise in 1891. 

Mr. Rauh's career as one of the able and 
honored business men of Indianapolis, has 
been one of secure and consecutive progress, 
and through his well directed endeavors he 
has done not a little to further the industrial 
and commercial prestige 6f the city. In 1891 
he became president and one of the principal 
stockholders of the Moore Packing Company, 
one of the leading concerns of its kind in the 
state, and he continued its chief executive 
officer until 1897, when he was elected presi- 
dent of the Belt Railroad & Stockyards Com- 
pany and also of the People's Light & Heat 
Company, with the administration of the af- 
fairs of which great and important corpora- 
tions he is still identified in this capacity. He 
is also vice-president of the Federal Union 
Surety Company, of Indianapolis; is a direc- 
tor of the Abattoir Beef & Pork Packing 
Company and the E. Rauh Fertilizer Com- 
pany; is first vice-president of E. Rauh & 
Sons Fertilizing Company; vice-president of 
E. Rauh & Sons Company, engaged in the 
hide business; a director of the Union Trust 
Company; and vice-president of the Egry 
Register Company, of Dayton, Ohio. Mr. 
Rauh has shown great capacity for the man- 
agement of business enterprises of broad 
scope and importance, has ordered his course 
according to the highest principles of in- 
tegrity and honor, and has achieved a success 
worthy of the name. He is held in high re- 
gard as a citizen and business man and is a 
valued member of the Indianapolis Board of 
Trade and the Commercial Club. He and his 
family hold membership in Delaware street 
Temple, the leading Jewish church of the 
city. In politics, while never an aspirant for 
office, he accords a stanch allegiance to the 
Democratic party. 

On the 20th of May, 1879, Mr. Rauh was 
united in marriage to Miss Emma Sterne, 
^ho was born in Peru, Indiana, and who is 
a daughter of Charles F. and Eugenia 
(Fries) Sterne, and seven of their eight chil- 
dren are living, Mrs. Rauh being the eldest. 
The father was for many years a prominent 
manufacturer of woolens, having been the 
owner of the old Peru woolen mills and also 
having owned and operated the gas plant in 



HISTOllY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



815 



that city, where he continued to hold pres- 
tige as a representative citizen and business 
man' until his death. His wife also is de- 



Mr. and Mrs. Rauh have three children,— 
Estelle, who is the wife of Samuel D. Wild, 
of Cleveland, Ohio; Charles, who is assistant 
manager of E. Rauh & Sons Fertilizer Com- 
pany; and Hortense, who remains at the 
parental home. 

Ernest de Wolfe Wales, M. D. One of the 
able representatives of the medical profession 
in the capital city of Indiana is Dr. Wales, 
who is engaged in successful practice as a 
specialist in the treatment of the diseases of 
the ear, nose and throat, in connection with 
which he has attained distinctive prestige, 
and who is clinical professor of this class of 
diseases in the Indiana University School of 
Medicine, one of the noteworthy institutions 
of Indianapolis. 

Dr. Wales was born in Braintree, Massa- 
chusetts, on the 1st of September, 1873, and 
is a son of George Oliver Wales and Abigail 
Frances Paine (Howard) Wales, the former 
of whom is still living, being head of the firm 
of George 0. Wales & Company, iron mer- 
chants and agents for manufacturers, in the 
City of Boston, Massachusetts; the mother 
of the doctor died October 6, 1886. 

The subject of this sketch is of the tenth 
generation in line of direct descent from Na- 
thaniel Wales, son of John Wales, of York- 
shire, England. This Nathaniel Wales fig- 
ures as the founder of the family in America, 
having come to the new world on the ship 
"James" in 1635 and having settled at Dor- 
chester, Massachusetts. He died in Boston, 
December 4, 1661. His son Nathaniel, who 
died in Boston, on the 10th of May, 1662, 
married Isabel Atherton, daughter of Major 
Humphrey Atherton. The tiext in direct line 
of descent was their son Nathaniel, who was 
born about 1649, and who died March 23, 
1718, having settled at Braintree, Massachu- 
setts, in 1673. By his first wife, Elizabeth, 
he had one child, Elizabeth, who was born in 
1675 and who became the wife of John Child. 
His second wife was Joanna Faxon, who was 
born September 20, 1661, and who died May 
11, 1704. She was a daughter of Thomas 
and Deborah (Th'ayer) Faxon. Nathaniel 
and Joanna (Faxon) Wales became the pa- 
rents of fourteen children, namely: Joanna, 
Sarah, Nathaniel, Joanna (II), Elkanah, 
Deborah, Thomas, Mary, Samuel, Thomas 
(II), Joseph, John, Rachel, and Atherton. 
Of these children the one to whom Dr. Wales 
traces his lineage was Captain Elkanah Wales, 
who was born on the 1st of December, 1685, 



and who died December 12, 1763. On the 
17th of May, 1808, he married Elizabeth 
Holbrook, who was born September 30, 1684, 
and died February 27, 1763 ; she was a daugh- 
ter of Samuel and Lydia Holbrook, of V/ey- 
mouth. The four children of this union were 
Elizabeth, Elkanah, Samuel and Nathaniel. 
Captain Nathaniel Wales was born April 11, 
1717, and died June 26, 1790. He first mar- 
ried Anna Wild, daughter of William and 
Ruth .(Hersey) Wild, and they had five chil- 
dren— Aseph. Elizabeth, Achsah, Elkanah, 
and Anna, On the SOth of May, 1754, Cap- 
tain Nathaniel Wales contracted a second 
marriage, having then been united to Mrs. 
Anne Fitch, widow of Joseph Fitch and 
daughter of John and Elizabeth (Penno) 
Waldo. She was born July 15, 1719, and 
died in February, 1801. By her marriage to 
Captain Wales she had three children— Eliz- 
abeth, Nath^iel and Benjamin. The second 
of these children was the representative of 
the sixth generation in line of descent to the 
subject of this review. 

Major Nathaniel Wales, son of Captain Na- 
thaniel and Anne (Waldo) Wales, was born 
on the 8th of February, 1757, and died De- 
cember 24, 1825. On the 4th of December, 
1778, he married Mary Hayden, who was 
born February 14, 1757, and died January 
27, 1841 ; she was a daughter of Benjamin 
and Mary (Wild) Hayden, and she became 
the mother of three sons and one daughter, 
namely: Nathaniel, Benjamin, Mary, and 
John Waldo. Of these, Nathaniel, seventh 
sreneration, was born October 7, 1779, and 
died October 11, 1851. On the 20th of De- 
cember, 1806, he married Sarah Wild, who 
was born in 1787, and died December 25, 
1871; she was a daughter of Jonathan and 
Deborah (Wild) Wild and became the mother 
of ten children— Mary Waldo, Sarah Ann, 
Jonathan Wild, Harriet Newell, Nathaniel 
Waldo, George, Benjamin Carr, William H., 
Ruth, and Thomas. 

George" Wales (eighth generation) was born 
May 2, 1820, and married Isabella C. Moul- 
ton, who was born January 25, 1821, and 
who was a daughter of Oliver and Salome 
(LaPlaine) Moulton. The LaPlaines were 
French Huguenots who fled from France to 
escape the religious persecutions incidental to 
the revocation of the Edict of Nantes, settling 
in England, whence came the founders of the 
family in America. Here settlement was 
made at Roxbury, Massachusetts, and, later, 
members of the family became identified with 
the settlement of Hallowell, Maine. George 
and Isabella C. (Moulton) Wales, grandpar- 
ents of Dr. Wales, became the parents of 



816 



mSTOIlY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



thiec children — George Oliver, father of the 
doctor; Joseph Moiilti n ; and Isabella. George 
Oliver Wales was born April 1, 1848, and 
has long been a representative business man 
and honored citizen of Boston. His first mar- 
riage, to Abigail Frances Paine Howard, was 
solemnized on the 9th of November, 1870, 
and "Sirs. Wales was summoned to the life 
eternal on the 6th of October, 1886. The sur- 
viving children of this union are here men- 
tioned in order of birth : George Howard, 
Boston, Massachusetts; Ernest de Wolfe j 
Mary Helen, married Willis Howard Butler, 
minister of Edwards Church, Northampton, 
Massachusetts; Louise F. and Nathaniel 
Braekett, Boston, Massachusetts. TJie second 
marriage of George Oliver AVales was sol- 
emnized on the 16th of December, 1896, when 
Lucy Gary Morse became his wife. They have 
no children. 

Dr. Ernest de AVolfe AVales was afforded 
the advantages of the public schools of the 
city of Boston, where he was graduated in 
the high school as a member of the class of 
1891. He then entered Harvard University, 
in which he was graduated in 1896, with the 
degree of Bachelor of Science, and in the 
medical department of the same historic in- 
stitution he was graduated as a member of 
the class of 1899, duly receiving his degree 
of Doctor of Medicine. After his graduation 
he passed a year in effective post-graduate 
work in the University of Berlin, Germany, 
returning to the United States in the summer 
of 1900 and engaging in the practice of his 
profession in the city of Boston. From 1900 
to 1901 he was aural house surgeon of the 
^Massachusetts Charitable Eye and Ear In- 
firmary, in which institution he was there- 
after clinical assistant until 1904. From 1905 
to 1906 he was assistant surgeon in the throat 
room of Massachusetts General Hospital, and 
from 1904 to 1906 he was assistant aural sur- 
areon of the Massachusetts Charitable Eye and 
Ear Infirmary, serving simultaneously as as- 
sistant in otologj' in Harvard ^Medical School. 
his alma mater. In the autumn of 1906 Dr. 
Wales took up his residence in Indianapolis, 
where he has met with unqualified success 
and gained marked precedence in the practice 
of the important branch of his profession in 
which he is specializing. Soon after his ar- 
rival in this city he was appointed clinical 
professor .of diseases of the ear, nose and 
throat in the Indiana University School of 
Aledicine, and he has since remained incum- 
bent of this position, being a valued member 
of the facultj- of the institution and being 
recognized as an authority in his special 
field and as an able and discriminating edu- 



cator. He controls a large and representative 
practice and is held in unequivocal esteem by 
his professional confreres in the capital city. 

Dr. AVales is identified with the Natural 
History Society of Harvard University; the 
Harvard Religious Union, of which he was 
secretary for one year; the Pi Eta fraternity 
of the same university; is a life member of 
the Harvard Union and also of the Young 
Men's Christian Union, of Boston. He was a 
member of the Boston L^niversity Club from 
1904 until his removal to Indianapolis, and 
in a professional way he holds membership 
in the Boylston Medical Society (Boston), 
the American Medical Association, the Amer- 
ican Otological Society, the American LarjTi- 
gological, Rhinological and Otological So- 
ciety, the American Academy of Ophthal- 
mology and Oto-Liryngology, and the In- 
dianapolis Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat So- 
ciety, besides which he formerly held mem- 
bership in the New England Otological and 
Laryngological Society, during the time he 
was engaged in the practice of his profession 
in Boston. He and his wife hold member- 
sliip in All Souls Unitarian Church of In- 
dianapolis; he is a Democrat in his political 
proclivities; he holds membership in the Ger- 
man House and the Country Club of Indian- 
apolis ; and here is affiliated with Center 
Lodge No. 23, Free and Accepted Masons. 

In the City of Minneapolis. Minnesota, on 
the 21st of June. 1899, Dr. Wales was united 
in marriage to Miss Franc Hale, daughter 
of George W. Hale and Jeanette (Webster) 
Hale, both of whom are deceased, the latter 
being a representative of the same family line 
as was Daniel Webster. Dr. and Mrs. Wales 
have two children— Jeanette, who was born 
on the 4th of April. 1902, and Elizabeth, who 
was born on the 7th of January, 1904. 

Frederick J. M.\ck. Among the progres- 
sive business men and highly honored citi- 
zens of Indianapolis is numbered the subject 
of this review, who is at the present time a 
member of the Board of Public AA^orks and 
who is head of the well known firm of F. J. 
Mack & Company, house painters, interior 
decorators, freseoei-s, sign painters, and scenic 
artists, with headquarters at 26 Kent.uck>" 
avenue. The concern is one of the largest 
and most important of its kind in the city 
and controls an e.xtensive and substantial 
business. Mr. Mack has been a resident of 
Indianapolis for nearly two score of yeai-s 
and has here won success through his own 
energy and ability, the while he has ever 
stood exponent of the most loyal and useful 
citizenship and has merited the high esteem 
in which he is uniformly held. 



HISTOEY OF GREATEE INDIANAPOLIS. 



817 



Frederick John Mack comes of stanch Ger- 
man lineage and is himself a native of the 
old Buckeye state of the Union, having been 
born in the city of Cleveland, Ohio, on the 
5th of January, 1854. and being a son of 
Frederick J. and Eegina (Baumann) Mack, 
the former of whom was born in Wurtem- 
berg, Germany, and the latter in the kingdom 
of Bavaria. They came to America when 
young and passed the closing years of their 
lives in Fort Wayne, Indiana, where the 
father had long followed the vocation of mer- 
chant. Both were consistent members of the 
Lutheran Church and were folk of sterling 
attributes of character. 

Frederick J. Mack gained his rudimentary 
education in the public schools of his native 
city, and in 1867, when thirteen years of age, 
he became a resident of Allen County, In- 
diana, where he continued to attend school as 
opportimity afforded and where he found em- 
ploj'ment principally in connection with 
manufacturing industries as an employe. In 
1872, when eighteen years of age, Mr. Mack 
came to Indianapolis, where he has ever since 
maintained his residence and where he has 
gained independence and success as an active 
and enterprising business man. Soon after 
his arrival in the capital city he entered upon 
an apprenticeship at the trade of fresco paint- 
ing, in which he finally became an expert 
artisan and one of special ability in the de- 
vising and carrying out of original and 
artistic decorative work. In 1877, when 
twenty-three years of age, he initiated busi- 
ness for himself, in the line of his trade, and 
in this connection he has directed his ener- 
gies with so much of discrimination and abil- 
ity and has been so honorable and upright in 
all his dealings and transactions that he has 
built up a business of which no other of its 
kind in the city can take precedence. The 
enterprise is now conducted under the title 
of F. J. Mack & Company, and his associates 
in the same are his son Frederick L. and 
Clemens W. Beck, who have proved his able 
and valued eoad.jutors. 

Mr. Mack has taken a zealous inte/est in 
all that has tended to conserve the progress 
and material and civic welfare of his home 
city; and in the domain of practical politics 
he has wielded no little influence. In 1884 
he was elected to represent the 24th ward in 
the city council, and in - 1886 he was again 
elected to this office. In 1890 still more dis- 
tinctive evidence of his personal popularity 
was given in his election as representative of 
Marion County in the legislature, in which 
he Avas an active and valued member during 
the general assembly of 1891, in which he 



made an admirable record in the conservation 
of wise legislation. For five years, under the 
administration of Mayor Thomas Taggart, he 
held the responsible position of member of 
the board of safety, representing an impor- 
tant department of the municipal govern- 
ment. Of this board he was president and as 
such he gave most effective and timely serv- 
ice in the handling of the affairs of the de- 
partment. For one year (1902-1903) Mr. 
Mack was a member of the park board. He 
has ever given an uncompromising allegiance 
to the Democratic party and is well fortified 
in his convictions and opinions as to matters 
of public policy. 

Mr. Mack is identified with a number of 
the essentially representative fraternal and 
social organizations of the capital city, and 
in each his popularity is of the most positive 
order. He is affiliated with the Masonic 
fraternity, and he is also identified with the 
United Ancient Order of Druids, the Knights 
of Pythias and the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks. He holds membership in the 
Commercial Club, the German Orphan Home 
Association, the Indianapolis Maennerehor, 
the German House, the Independent Tumver- 
ein, the German-American Democratic Club, 
and other organizations, and the Southside 
Turnverein. 

On the 2nd of March, 1876, Mr. Mack was 
united in marriage to Miss Josephine Beck, 
who was born at Germany, and who is a 
daughter of the late Conrad Beck. Mr. and 
Mrs. Mack have six children: Frederick L., 
Carrie, Lambert W., "William E., Joseph C. 
and Lillian. Three are married and living in 
Indianapolis; Joseph C. is in Dallas, Texas, 
and William E. and Lillian are living at 
home. 

Charles A. Korbly. The state of In- 
diana has reason to take pride in the per- 
sonnel of her corps of representatives in the 
federal congress from the early days in the 
history of this commonwealth to the present 
time, and on the roll of honored names that 
indicates the service of distinguished citizens 
in this branch of governmental affairs there 
is reason in reverting with gratfication to that 
of Hon. Charles A. Korbly, of Indianapolis, 
who is the present representative of the Sev- 
enth district in the lower house of the na- 
tional legislature. He is a native son of the 
old Hoosier state, is a representative mem- 
ber of the bar of Indianapolis, and is a mem- 
ber of a family that has been one of promi- 
nence and influence in public and civic af- 
fairs in Indiana for many years. 

Charles A. Korbly was born in Madison. 
Jefferson County, Indiana, on the 24th of 



818 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



March, 1871, and is a son of Charles Alex- 
ander Korbly and Mary (Bright) Korbly. 
His father was born in Kentucky and was a 
son of Christian Korbly, who was a native 
of Germany and who became a resident of 
the city of Louisville, Kentuckj% where he 
continued to reside until 1849, when he joined 
the throng of argonauts making its way across 
the plains to California after the discovery 
of gold in that state, where he met his death. 
Soon afterward his widow removed to Ripley 
County, Indiana, where Charles A. Korbly, 
Sr., was reared to maturity. Here he received 
some education at home, and for a while 
taught school. He finally took up the study 
of law, and for thirty years be was success- 
fully engaged in the practice of his profes- 
sion at Madison, from which place he removed 
to Indianapolis in 1895. He gained still 
higher prestige in his chosen profession after 
becoming a member of the bar of the capital 
city, and here he continued to maintain his 
home until the time of his death, in 1900, at 
the age of tifty-eight years. His wiie sur- 
vives him and still resides in this city. She 
is a daughter of Michael Bright, who was 
a native of the state of New York and who 
was a scion of one of the stanch old Revo- 
lutionary families of Pennsylvania and who 
was an honored pioneer member of the bar 
of Indiana. He was engaged in the practice 
of his profession at Madison, this state, 
whence he finally removed to Indianapolis, 
where he continued in the successful practice 
of law, becoming one of the leading members 
of the bar of this commonwealth and wield- 
ing much influence in public affairs. 

Hon. Charles A. Korbly has well upheld 
the honors of the name that he bears, both as 
a member of the legal profession and as a 
citizen of prominence and influence in public 
life. He was reared to maturity in his na- 
tive city of Madison, and there gained his 
early educational discipline in the parochial 
school of St. Mary's Catholic Church, of 
which his parents were devout communicants. 
He began the study of law under the able 
preceptorship of his honored father prior to 
the family removal to Indianapolis, and in the 
latter city he was admitted to the bar in the 
year 1896. Here his father was a member 
of the law firm of Smith & Korbly, and with 
this firm the subject of this review continued 
to be associated in practice until the death 
of his father, in 1900. He and his brother 
Bernard continued to be associated with 
Alonzo Green Smith in their professional 
work, and in 1902 Charles A. severed his con- 
nection with the firm and continued an in- 
(^ividual practice. Shortly afterward, how- 



ever, he returned to Madison, to attend to cer- 
tain property interests of the family, and he 
remained in that city from 1903 until 1907, 
in which latter year he resumed the practice 
of his profession in Indianapolis. 

In the spring of 1908 Mr. Korbly was made 
the nominee on the Democratic ticket for rep- 
resentative of the Seventh district in Con- 
gress, and in the ensuing November election 
he was successful in overcoming a large Re- 
publican majority, receiving a gratifying en- 
dorsement at the polls. As one of the active 
and well fortified younger members of Con- 
gress he has made a record creditable alike to 
his state and to his fidelity and discrimination 
as a legislator. For fully a decade he has 
been a zealous and eflt'ective worker in behalf 
of the cause of the Democratic party, and he 
has served as a member of various party com- 
mittees in his home state. He is a versatile 
advocate at the bar and an effective public 
speaker, and he has been a successful fac- 
tor in campaign work in Indiana. He is a 
member of the Indiana Bar Association and 
is identified with the Indianapolis Board of 
Trade and the Commercial Club and the In- 
diana State Historical Society. The impor- 
tant official position of which he is incumbent 
offers emphatic voucher for his personal pop- 
ularity. 

On 'the 10th of June, 1902, was solemnized 
the marriage of Mr. Korbly to Miss Isabel 
Palmer, who was born and reared in Indian- 
apolis, Indiana, and who is a member of one 
of the distinguished pioneer families of this 
state. She is a daughter of Edward and 
Elizabeth (Stephens') Palmer and is a grand- 
daughter of Hon. Nathan B. Palmer, who 
was speaker of the Indiana House of Repre- 
sentatives in 1832 and who was shortly aft- 
erward elected treasurer of the state. The 
Palmer family was founded in America in 
the colonial epoch of our national history 
and representatives of the same were found 
enrolled as valiant soldiers of the Continental 
line during the War of the Revolution. 

"WnxiAM OsENBACH, M. D. A representa- 
tive member of the medical profession in In- 
diianapolis, where he is specially prominent 
in the field of surgery, is Dr. William Osen- 
baeh, who has been engaged in practice in the 
capital city since the year 1896 and whose 
success in his chosen vocation has been of the 
most unequivocal type. 

Dr. Osenbach is a native of the City of 
Lafayette, Indiana, where he was born on 
the 29th of June, 1866, and he is a son of 
Fletcher and Emma (Gipe) Osenbach. both 
of whom were born at Noblesville, this state, 
nf German lineage. They were reared and 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDlANArOLIS. 



810 



educated in their native town and there their 
marriage was solemnized, soon after which 
important event in their lives they removed 
to Lafayette, where, they have maintained 
their home during the long intervening years. 
The father, who was for many years a suc- 
cessful and popular traveling salesman, is 
now identified with the hardware business 
in Lafayette, where he has £ver commanded 
unqualified confidence and esteem and where 
he is an influential citizen and representative 
business man. Of the five children two are 
deceased, and of the three surviving the sub- 
ject of this sketch is the eldest ; Delia is the 
wife of William McCarty and resides in La- 
fayette; and Elmer is identified with busi- 
ness interests at Lafayette. 

Dr. Osenbach was reared to manhood in 
his native city, to whose public schools he is 
indebted for his earlier educational discipline, 
which included a course in the high school. 
Having formulated definite plans for his fu- 
ture career, in 1892 he was matriculated in 
the Central College of Physicians and Sur- 
geons, in Indianapolis, in which he completed 
the prescribed technical course and was grad- 
uated as a member of the class of 1896, with 
the degree of Doctor of Medicine. He forth- 
Avrth engaged in the active work of his pro- 
fession in Indianapolis, where his success has 
been of cumulative order and where he has 
gained marked precedence in the surgical 
branch of his practice, which is essentially of 
representative character. He has shown dis- 
tinctive devotion to his exacting vocation, in 
which his labors have been unremitting and 
his study and investigation such as to keep 
him in the most perfect touch with the ad- 
vances made in both medical and surgical 
science. In the years 1903-4-5 he did ef- 
fective post-graduate work in the Chicago 
Post-Graduate Medical School, and he has 
devoted much attention to the line of work 
which he has made his specialty, that of sur- 
gery. He is consulting surgeon to the Dea- 
coness Hospital, of Indianapolis, and is sur- 
^eon-in-chief of the Cincinnati, Hamilton and 
Dayton Railroad, besides which he is surgeon 
for a large number of the leading manufac- 
turing concerns of Indianapolis. He holds 
membership in the Indianapolis Medical So- 
ciety, the Indiana State Medical Society, and 
the American Medical Association. In poli- 
tics the doctor gives his allegiance to the Re- 
publican party, he is affiliated with Marion 
Lodge No. 35, Free and Accepted Masons, 
and is identified with Star" Lodge No. 7, 
Knights of Pythias, of which he is past chan- 
cellor commander. Both he and his wife 



hold member.ship in the Central Avenue Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church. 

In 1888 Dr. Oseribach was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Sophronia Rycraft, who was 
born and reared in Lafayette, Indiana, and 
they have one daughter, Zelda, who is an 
accomplished pianist, having taken the artists' 
course on the piano at the Indianapolis Con- 
servatory of Music, and has shown marked 
ability and talent in her chosen calling. 

David M. Parry. The glory of our great 
American republic is in the perpetuation of 
individuality and in the according of the ut- 
most scope for individual accomplishment. 
Fostered under auspicious surroundings, the 
nation has produced men of the finest mental 
caliber, of true virile strength and of vigor- 
ous purpose. The record of accomplishment 
in the individual sense is the record which 
the true and loyal American holds in highest 
appreciation and honor. Among the prolific 
workers in conpection with the productive 
activities of life is found David M. Parry, 
who may well be designated as one of the val- 
iant and resourceful "captains of industry" 
who have conserved the progress and up- 
building of the "Greater Indianapolis" 
where he was president of the Parry Manu- 
facturing Company, representing one of the 
important industrial concerns of the capital 
city, and where he has also been a factor in 
the promotion of other noteworthy entei'- 
prises. He is no^v president of Parry Auto 
Company, is vice-president of the Indianap- 
olis Southern Railway Company, and not in 
an ephemeral way is his name associated with 
the word progress. He has shown marked 
initiative ability, has been a power in practi- 
cal business and commercial enterprise, and 
has given his influence and tangible support 
to every worthy movement for civic better- 
ment. As one of the essentially representa- 
tive business men of Indianapolis he is well 
entitled to consideration in this publication. 
His career has been characterized by cour- 
age, confidence, progressiveness and impreg- 
nable integrity of purpose, and he has Avon 
success that is worthy of the name. 

David M. Parry was born in Allegany 
County, Pennsylvania, near the city of Pitts- 
burg, on the 26th of ^Nfarch, 1852. and is a 
son of Thomas J. and Lydia (Maclean) Par- 
ry, both of whom were natives of the city of 
Pittsburg and members of honored pioneer 
families of the old Keystone state of the 
Union. The Parry family .traces its lineage 
back to stanch Welsh origin and the subject 
of this review is a representative of the third 
generation of the family in America. His 
paternal grandfather, Henry Parr>% was bom 



820 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



in "Wales, where he was reared and educated 
and where he was well trained for the pro- 
fession of civil engineering, to which he de- 
voted his attention upon coming to America. 
He had the distinction of erecting the first 
court house west of the Alleghany Mountains 
in Pennsylvania. He established his home in 
the city of Pittsburg, where he passed the 
residue of his life, which was prolonged to an 
advanced age. He rendered effective service 
in the War of 1812, in which he had super- 
vision of the somewhat primitive cannon util- 
ized by the American forces in their second 
conflict with England. He married a daugh- 
ter of General John Cadwallader, and of this 
union twelve children were bom. 

General John Cadwallader was one of the 
distinguished men of his day and generation, 
and history bears record of his gallant serv- 
ices as a general of the patriot forces in the 
war of the Revolution, in which he was a 
valued member of the staff of General Wash- 
ington. He laid out the historic old Fort 
DuQuesne, and he was a most ardent patriot, 
having been a stalwart advocate of the cause 
of national independence during the cli- 
macteric period leading up to the Revolution. 
His father. Dr. Thomas Cadwallader, presided 
over a famous "tea party", held in a coffee- 
house in Philadelphia, prior to the more cele- 
brated "Boston tea party". The meeting 
thus held in Philadelphia was the first one 
to voice protest in such manner against the 
unjust taxation imposed by the mother coun- 
try. The Cadwallader family is of Welsh 
origin and has ever been renowned for the 
high intellectuality of its representatives. 
Dr. Thomas Cadwallader was a distinguished 
physician and pathologist and was an inti- 
mate friend and associate of Benjamin 
Franklin. He was a man of exceptional schol- 
astic and scientific erudition and was the 
coadjutor of Dr. Rush and others in the 
founding of the University of Penns.ylvania. 

Thoma.s Parry, the youngest of the twelve 
children of Henry Parry, was reared to man- 
hood in Pennsylvania, where he received good 
educational advantages, according to tlu' 
standard of the period, and he continued his 
residence in his native state until 1853, when 
he removed to Indiana and settled on a farm 
near Laurel, Franklin County, where he was 
long and successfully identified with agricul- 
tural pursuits and where he ever commanded , 
a secure place in popular confidence and es- 
teem, having been a man of strong mentality 
and having wielded no little influence in pub- 
lic affairs of a local order. He pa.ssed the 
last seven years of his life in Indianapolis, 
where he died in 1899. at the venerable ape 



of seventy-six years. He was a stanch Re- 
publican in his political adherency and both 
he and his wife were devout members of the 
Presbyterian Church. Mrs. Parry was a 
daughter of Matthew Maclean, who was born 
and reared in Scotland, and who took up his 
residence in Pittsburg upon coming to the 
United States. He was a man of marked 
ability and was an influential factor in pub- 
lie affairs in Pennsylvania, where for half a 
century he was the owner and editor of the 
Pittsburg Gazette and where he died at a 
venerable age. He and his wife became the 
parents of one son and four daughters. Aft- 
er the death of her honored husband Mrs. 
Lydia (Maclean) Parry remained in Indian- 
apolis, whej^ she passM the closing years of 
her signally gentle and gracious life in the 
home of her only daughter, but while visiting 
her sister in Parnassus, Pennsylvania, died on 
the 12th of December, 1903, at about eighty 
years of age. 

David M. Parry, was about nine months old 
at the time of the family removal from Penn- 
sylvania to Indiana, and he passed his boy- 
hood and youth on the home farm, near 
Laurel, Franklin County, in which locality he 
duly availed himself of the advantages of 
the district school, in the meanwhile con- 
tributing his quota to the work of the farm. 
At the age of sixteen years, with no particu- 
lar blare of trumpets or pomp of circum- 
stance, Mr. Parry gave initiation to his husi- 
ness career. He left the home farm and be- 
took himself to the neighboring village of 
Laurel, where he assumed the dignified posi- 
tion of clerk in a general store, receiving in 
compensation for his serA'ices the princely sti- 
pend of ten dollars a month, from which he 
paid for his own maintenance. He remained 
thus engaged for a period of about eighteen 
months and then went to Lawrenceburg, 
where for two years he held a clerkship in 
a dry-goods store. In 1872 he went to Co- 
lumbus City, Iowa, where he passed a few 
months as clerk in a store conducted by his 
brother Edward, who is .now a resident of 
Indianapolis and who is the eldest of the 
family of five children ; the subject of this 
review was the second in order of birth ; Jen- 
nie is the widow of 0. P. Griffith and resides 
in Indianapolis; Thomas H. and St. Clair, 
are interested principals in the Parry Manu- 
facturing Company, and thus all of the chil- 
dren now maintain their home in Indianap- 
olis. From Iowa, David M. Parry went to 
New York City, where he became bookkeeper 
for the New York Enamel Paint Company, 
retaining this position about one -year, after 
which he was there employed as a salesman 



HISTOEY OF GEEATEK INDIANAPOLIS. 



821 



in the wholesale dry-goods house of Ober- 
holser & Keefer until 1873, when he returned 
to Indiana and located at Connersville, where 
he and his brother Edward engaged in the 
hardware business; the requisite capital hav- 
ing been furnished by their father. A few 
years later the honored father met with finan- 
cial reverses and David M. Parry sold his 
interest in the hardware business and di- 
verted the proceeds to meeting his father's 
obligations and thus saving to him his home- 
stead farm. 

Under these conditions David M. Parry as- 
sumed a position as traveling salesman for a 
wholesale hardware house in Cincinnati, in 
whose interests he covered territory in east- 
ern Indiana and western Ohio for a period of 
about three years, within which time he so 
carefully conserved his resources that he was 
enabled to purchase a hardware store at 
Rushville, Indiana, where he established his 
home and continued in business until 1882, 
when he disposed of his interests in that 
place. He had made preparations to go to 
South America early in that year, as a sales- 
man of agricultural implements, but the 
death of his wife, who was survived by two 
little daughters, caused hiiji to abandon this 
trip. In his consideration of ways and means 
he finally was led to purchase a small car- 
riage shop in Rushville, and there he con- 
tinued the operation of the business, upon a 
modest scale, for a period of two years, at 
the expiration of which, in 1886, he removed 
to Indianapolis, where he has since main- 
tained his home and where he has gained 
splendid success and prestige in the indus- 
trial field. Concerning the development of 
the important manufacturing enterprise of 
which he was the head, the following perti- 
nent statements have been made: "The im- 
mense concern which he built up was begun 
in a very modest way. Mr. Parry rented a 
part of the old Woodburn Sarven Wheel 
Works and began manufacturing vehicles and 
farm implements, meeting with success from 
the very start. He began operations with 
about forty persons represented on his pay 
rolls, and the business has increased so phtv 
nomenally that this concern now gives em- 
ployment to about twenty-four hundred per- 
sons. The factory is particularly noted for 
the high grade of its light-weight vehicles of 
all kinds, and these are marketed all over the 
world. For several years Mr. Parry's brother 
Thomas H. was bookkeeper for the establish- 
ment, in which he had an interest from the 
inception of operations, and about 1891 his 
brother St. Clair entered the firm. In 1899 
the eldest of the brothers, Edward, came into 



the business, which is now conducted under 
the name of the Parry Manufacturing Com- 
pany. The plant is modern in equipment and 
facilities, and the large and substantial build- 
ings are situated on a sixty-acre tract of 
ground west of White River, the offices being 
at the factory." 

The Parry Manufacturing Company is one 
of the substantial and extensive manufactur- 
ing concerns that have contributed materially 
to the industrial and commercial prestige of 
Indianapolis. The Parry Manufacturings 
Company and its offices are now located on 
Parry avenue, Henry and the Vandalia Rail- 
road. From the beginning David M. Parry 
exercised the decisive influence in the man- 
agement of the business, and that its great 
success is largely attributable to his persist- 
ent energy, sagacity, integrity and marked 
initiative and constructive ability, is free- 
ly and uniformly acknowledged by all 
who are familiar with the upbuilding of 
the magnificent enterprise. In May, 1909, 
Mr. Parry resigned the office of president 
of the Parry Manufacturing Company, 
in which he still holds his interests, and 
is now the president of the Parry Auto 
Company, which was incorporated July 28, 
1909, with a capital stock of one million dol- 
lars, Mr. Parry being the organizer of the 
Coonpany. The plant is located at Standard 
avenue and Division street, where they manu- 
,fa«ture the Parry Car. In 1904 Mr. Parry 
organized the American Manufacturers' Mu- 
tual Fire Insurance Company, with headquar- 
ters at Indianapolis, which has grown to be 
one of the three largest of its kind in the 
country. He was its first president and still 
is incumbent of that office. In 1909 he be- 
came president of the Automobile Insurance 
Company of America, which was organized 
by Cincinnati capital, October 21, 1909, be- 
ing the date of incorporation. A man of so 
broad capacity naturally is led to find vari- 
ous avenues for the utilization of his ener- 
gies, and this has been true of Mr. Parry, 
who has identified himself with various other 
enterprises of important order. He is at 
the present time vice-president of the In- 
dianapolis Southern Railroad and has other 
capitalistic interests through which the prog- 
ress of the greater commercial city of In- 
dianapolis is being aided in no small degree. 
He is well known and held in high regard in 
local business circles and is one of the en- 
thusiastic, loyal and public-spirited citizens 
of the fair capital of the Hoosier state. He is 
a valued member of the National Association 
of Manufacturers of the United States, of 
which organization he had the distinction of 



S22 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



bfiii;; electeil president in 1902, serving t'oui- 
years. He has also served as president of 
the Indianapolis Board of Trade and of the 
Commercial Club, in the affairs of both of 
which important civic organizations he has 
shown a lively and helpful interest. 

Mr. Parry is distinctly a man of ideas and 
ideals, and he has not narrowed his mental 
horizon within the bounds of personal ad- 
vancement and aggrandizement. He has 
made for himself a secure place in the com- 
mercial and civic life of Indianapolis, and 
his vantage ground is one of the most stable 
order, from the fact that he has won right 
worthily his success and prestige as an able 
business man and sterling citizen. In the 
midst of the cares and exactions of business 
he has found time to place himself on record 
as an active worker in behalf of his home 
city and also in the field of practical so- 
ciology, to which he has given much thought 
and study. The following estimate is well 
worthy of reproduction in these pages: "As 
a large employer of labor, Mr. Parry has been 
deeply interested in the vital issues between 
capital and labor that have characterized re- 
cent popular movements, and he was the first 
man to make a stand against unjust demands 
and unlawful methods adopted by some of 
the organized-labor bodies, which he consid- 
ered a direct violation of American principles. 
His high personal character and well known 
principles, as well as his labors in behalf of 
the improvement of conditions among the 
working classes, absolved him from any 
charge of undue self-interest in the position 
he took and which was for the justness of all 
concerned. He is well known in Indianap- 
olis as an enthusiastic student of sociology 
and its problems, in which connection he is 
the author of the valuable book entitled the 
'Scarlet Empire'." 

In politics, though never a seeker of of- 
fice, Mr. Parry accords a stanch allegiance 
to the Republican party and is a loyal advo- 
cate of its cause. He and his wife hold mem- 
bership in the First Baptist Church, of which 
he is a trustee, and he has attained to the 
thirty-second degree of the Ancient Accepted 
Scottish Rite of ^fasonry. besides being al- 
filiated with the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows and the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks. 

On the 13th of October, 1875, that re- 
nowned clergyman, the late Rev. Henry 
Ward Beecher, solemnized the marriage of 
Mr. Parry to Miss Cora Harbottle, daugh- 
ter of Thomas and Helen (Mcintosh) Har- 
bottle, of Brooklyn, Nlnv York. :Mrs. Parry 
was u member of Plvmouth Church, in the 



City of Brooklyn, over which Mr. Beechei' 
piesided for so many years. Mrs. Cora 
(Harbottle) Parry was summoned to the life 
eternal in July, 1882. at the age of twenty- 
four years, and she is survived by two chil- 
dren—Helen, who is the wife of Frank X. 
Fitzgerald, of Indianapolis, and Cora, who 
is the wife of Warren D. Oakes, of this city. 

October 3, 1883, is the date of the marriage 
of Mr. Parry to ]Miss.Hessie ^laxvvell. daui-di- 
ter of John 31. and Isabell (Moffett) ?ilax- 
well, who were at that time residents of In- 
dianapolis. The names of the seven children 
of the second marriage are here noted: Ly- 
dia, ;\Iaxwell, Addison, Isabel, Ruth. Jean- 
ette, and David. The beautiful family home 
is at Golden Hill, one of the most attraetivi' 
residence sections of the Indiana capita!. 

Theodore E.vds Griffith. "Earn thy re- 
ward; the gods give naught to sloth ■". is an 
aphorism uttered long ago by the sage philoso- 
pher, Epicharmus, and the application of the 
precept is as insistent in this twentieth cen- 
tury as in the days of the remote past. A 
man whose life exemplified appreciation of 
the truth of this statement w^as Theodore 
Eads Griffith, who was in the most significant 
sense the architect of his own fortune and 
who left upon the annals of his period the 
record of a worthy life and of worthy ac- 
complishment. Measured by its beneficence, 
its rectitude, its altruism and its material 
success, his life counted for much, and in 
this history of the city in which he main- 
tained his home for thirty years and to whose 
industrial and civic progress he contributed 
his due quota, it is but consistent that a 
tribute to his memory and services be entered. 
He was summoned to the life eternal on the 
4th of November, 1906. at his home in In- 
dianapolis, and in his death the capital city 
lost one of its progressive and substantial 
business men and one of its most popular and 
honored citizens. He was head of the whole- 
sale millinery house of Grilfith Brothers at 
the time of his death and the same title is 
still maintained, his two sons being now the 
interested principals in the enterprise which 
he founded many years ago. 

Theodore Eads Griffith was born in Day- 
ton, Ohio, which city was then but a vil- 
lage, and the, date of his nativity was Octo- 
ber 14, 1845. He was a son of Thomas and 
Mar>' Elizabeth (Eads) Griffith, of whose 
eleven children he was the first born, and of 
the number it may be stated that only two 
are now living. Thomas Griffith was a na- 
tive of Pennsylvania, as was also his father, 
and the lineage of the family is traced back 
to stanch Welsh stock. The father of Thomas 



HISTOKY OF GKEATEK INDIANAPOLIS. 



823 



Griffith became one of the pioneers of Ohio, 
whither he removed from the old Keystone 
state early in the nineteenth century, and, 
from exposure while en route to the new- 
home, he died soon after his arrival. His 
family settled in the village of Dayton, and 
there Thomas Griffith eventually became an 
honored citizen. There both he and his wife 
passed the residue of fheir lives. 

Theodore E. Griffith was reared to ma- 
turity in Dayton, Ohi6, and that he made good 
use of the advantages afforded him in the 
common schools of the locality and period 
is evident when it is noted that when but 
fifteen years of age he became a successful 
teacher in the district schools of his native 
county. Later he became a salesman in a 
book store in Dayton, and when seventeen 
years of age he tendered his services in de- 
fense of the Union, having enlisted for a term 
of one hundred days as a member of a regi- 
ment of Ohio volunteer infantry, with which 
he served until the close of his term, when 
he received his honorable discharge. When 
about eighteen years of age Mr. Griffith be- 
came salesman for a wholesale millinery con- 
cern in Dayton, and he thus initiated his as- 
sociation with a line of enterprise in which 
he was destined to achieve splendid success in 
later years. After being employed as a sales- 
man for a short time he became a member of 
the firm, and about the year 1867 the control 
of this enterprise passed to the firm of Grif- 
fith Brothers, which was then organized. The 
original principals in this firm were the sub- 
ject of this memoir and his brother, George 
Franklin, and they gave close attention to 
business, availed themselves of progressive 
methods and built up a prosperous trade, 
based also upon the popular appreeiation of 
the integrity and honor of the brothers. In 
January, 1873, Theodore E. Griffith became 
a .junior partner in the firm of C. H. F. 
Ahrens & Company, of New York City, mann- 
faeturers of and importers of artificial flow- 
ers and feathers, and he then removed to the 
national metropolis, in the meanwhile retain- 
inff hi.s intei-est in the business in Dayton. 

On the 1st of January, 1876, Mr. Griffith 
removed from New York to Indianapolis, and 
here he continued to maintain his home until 
his death, fully thirty years afterward. Here 
he organized the firm of Griffith Brothers, 
wholesale milliners, and his associates in the 
enterprise were his two brothers, George F. 
and William H. In 1880 the Dayton busi- 
ness was consolidated with that in Indian- 
apolis, and at this time George F. Griffith 
withdrew from the firm, to which Claude T. 
Griffith, elder son of the sub.iect of this mem- 



oii-, was admitted as a member in 1885. 
William H. Griffith died in 1898, and Carl V. 
Griffith, the younger son, then became a mem- 
ber of the firm, whose personnel thus consti- 
tuted Theodore E. Griffith and his two sons. 
Mr. Griffith continued to be actively iden- 
tified with the enterprise until his death, and 
the large and representative business con- 
trolled by the firm today stands in evidence 
of his capacity as an executive, his progres- 
sive ideas, and the invincible integrity of 
purpose upon which alone can public confi- 
dence and support be founded. 

For many j^ears the headquarters of the 
firm of Griffith Brothers was at 232 South 
Meridian street, and after the building was 
destroyed by fire, on the 19th of February, 
1905, the business was removed to the present 
eligible and spacious quarters, at Nos. 24 to 
32 West Maryland street, where is utilized 
a floor space of fully forty-five thousand 
square feet. In a figurative sense, Mr. Grif- 
fith literally built the ladder upon which he 
climbed to a position of independence and 
definite success in connection with the practi- 
cal affairs of life, and upon no portion of 
his career rests the slightest shadow of wrong 
or injustice. He was a genuine, high-minded 
gentleman, a sagacious and alert business 
man, a public-spirited and loyal citizen, and 
a generous and noble character. His life 
work, in all its relations, adequately indicates 
the man, and this offers the best possible mon- 
ument to his memory. To those to whom he 
gave his close friendship the many lovable 
traits of his character were best known, but 
his unvarying courtesy won to him the es- 
teem of all with whom he came in contact. 
With him friend.ship was inviolable, and thus 
he did not extend too widely his circle of in- 
timates, but those he indeed ' ' grappled to his 
soul with hooks of steel". In his home his 
interests centered, and his devotion to his 
family was of the most idyllic and unselfish 
character, so that to its members, while theira 
was the greatest of loss and bereavement 
when he was summoned to the life eternal, 
so also is theirs the greatest measure of con- 
solation and reconciliation, in that they had 
so closely touched his noble and gracious per- 
sonality. He commanded the high regard 
of all who knew him, and while never in pub- 
lie office or civic prominence, it is certain that 
few men so placed were better known to the 
people of Indianapolis in general. In politics 
Mr. Griffith gave his allegiance to the Re- 
publican party and he was ever loyal to all 
the duties of citizenship. As a member and 
director of the Civic League he took an ac- 
tive part in its work, and he always stood 



8-24 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



ready to lend his aid and inHuence in behalf 
of measures and enterprises tending to ad- 
vance the general welfare and the progress 
of his home city. He was a charter member 
of the Commercial Club and also held mem- 
bership in the Columbia Club and the Board 
of Trade. Though not formally a member of 
any religious body, he had a deep reverence 
for the spiritual verities and was a regular 
attendant of the Second Presb}i;erian Church. 

In 1865, at the age of nineteen years, Mr. 
Griffith was united in marriage to Miss 
Louisa Jane Hoover, who was born near Day- 
ton, Ohio. Mr. Griffith is survived by his 
wddow and two sons— Claude T. and Carl V. 

Claude T. Griffith was born in Dayton, 
Ohio, on the 18th of February, 1866, and was 
ten years of age at the time of the family 
removal to Indianapolis, where he duly 
availed himself of the advantages of the pub- 
lic schools, after which he entered historic 
old PhiUips Exeter Academy, at Exeter, New 
Hampshire, as a member of the class of 1884. 
In the following year he took a position with 
the firm of Griffith Brothers, as already noted, 
and he is now the senior member of the firm 
and one of the representative business men 
of the capital city. 

Carl Vernon Griffith was born in Dayton, 
Ohio, on the 8th of August, 1869, and -was 
reared in Indianapolis, where he completed 
the curriculum of the public schools, after 
which he was for a short time a student in 
the United States Military Academy, at 
Poughkeepsie, New York. Since leaving 
school he has been identified with the whole- 
sale millinery business founded by his father 
and he is now a member of the firm of Grif- 
fith Brothers. Both of the brothers are ad- 
herents of the Republican party and both are 
known as reliable and progressive business 
men, in which connection they are ably up- 
holding the high prestige of the honored name 
which they bear. 

Henry Russe. The great empire of Ger- 
many has contributed a most valuable ele- 
ment to the cosmopolitan social fabric of our 
American republic, which has had much to 
gain and nothing to lose from this source. 
Among those of German birth and ancestry 
who have attained to success and precedence 
in connection with civic and business affairs 
in the capital city of Indiana is Henry Russe, 
a citizen of sterling character and one to 
whom is accorded the highest confidence and 
esteem in the community which has so long 
represented his home and the field of his 
earnest, honest and successful endeavors. He 
has served in offices of public trust, has been 
a power for good in the field of practical 



philanthropy, has been one of the world's 
noble army of workers, and has gained suc- 
cess and independence through his own well- 
directed endeavors, having come to America 
as a stranger in a strange land, unfamiliar 
with the language of the country and un- 
fortified by financial resources. His career 
thus illustrates how much may be accom- 
plished by one animated .by integrity of pur- 
pose, courage, self-reliance and deteriminate 
ambition. Every page of his life history is 
open and free from blemish, and it is a mat- 
ter of satisfaction to the editors and pub- 
lishers of this work that they are able to 
here enter at least brief record concerning 
his life and worthy services. A wealth of 
incident and incentive lies in the career of 
the immigrant boy who came to America to 
work out his own way and who stands today 
as one of the best known and most honored 
citizens of Indianapolis, though his course 
has ever been marked by personal modest and 
unostentatious effort to be of aid to his fel- 
low men in less fortunate circumstances. 
Surely the man and. his work merit considera- 
tion. 

Henry Russe was born in the little city of 
Osnabrueck, kingdom of Hanover, Germany, 
on the 17th of April. 1849, and was the fourth 
in order of birth of the nine children born to 
Herman and Engel (Schuette) Russe, both of 
whom passed their entire lives in Germany, 
where the father was a farmer and general 
merchant and where he served for a number 
of years as a minor governmental officer. The 
familj^ name has long been identified with 
the annals of Hanoverian history, and the 
line is one of the sturdiest German type. Of 
the children, three are now living, and of 
the entire number two besides the subject of 
this review became citizens of the United 
States. 

Henry Russe was reared to manhood in 
his native place, and was afforded the advan- 
tages of the local schools, gaining a fair edu- 
cation in his native language. After leaving 
school he assisted his honored father in the 
work and management of the latter 's store 
until he had attained his legal majority, when, 
in 1869, he severed the ties which bound him 
to home and fatherland and set forth to seek 
his fortunes in America, to whose develop- 
ment and progress those of his race have 
contributed in most generous measure. He 
embarked at Bremen on the steamer "Her- 
man", which dropped anchor in the port of 
New York in February of the year mentioned. 
Mr. Russe did not long tarr\- in the national 
metropolis but made his way to Indiana, 
where he was employed for a few months as a 



HISTOEY OF GREATEK INDIANAPOLIS. 



825 



laborer on the "Panhandle" Railroad, now a 
part of the Pennsylvania Lines. He came to 
Indianapolis in 1870, and here he has sinct 
maintained his home, the while he has ad- 
vanced from a position of obscurity to one 
of substantial prestige as a; business man and 
representative citizen. The mental and moral 
fiber of the young German was well able to 
withstand the tension of the intervening years 
of earnest toil and endeavor, and the strength 
of his character, his persistence, energy and 
ability, enabled him to move forward, step by 
step, to the goal of his worthy ambitions. 
For a time after establishing his home in In- 
diana Mr. Russe found it necessary to secure 
employment as a farm hand in Richmond, 
and later he was employed in a local brick 
yard and in a pork-packing establishment, 
having a due appreciation of the dignity of 
honest toil and turning his hand to such work 
as he could secure, with no handicap of false 
pride or vanity. His early efforts and the 
vicissitudes which he encountered have doubt- 
less been the cause of his lively sympathy for 
tho.se in misfortune or need, and he has done 
much to aid those who have felt the lash of 
necessity even as did he in those early days. 
Finally IVIr. Russe secured employment as en- 
gine wiper in the local yards of the "Panhan- 
dle" Railroad, and later he was advanced to 
the position of locomotive fireman, in .which 
capacity he worked for two years, at the ex- 
piration of which he became car inspector for 
the same road, a position which he retained 
until 1874, when, during a strike of the rail- 
road employes, he refused to obey orders and 
take out and run an engine, thereby antago- 
nizing his fellow workmen, and because of 
such action his wages were reduced, under 
which conditions he resigned his position with 
the "Panhandle" and entered the employ of 
the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St. Loiiis 
Railroad Company ("Big Four"), which he 
served in the capacity of car inspector for the 
ensuing sixteen years, proving a faithful and 
valued employe. 

In 1889 Mr. Russe resigned his position 
with the railroad company and engaged in 
the wholesale and retail grain and seed busi- 
ness, in which he has since continued and 
through which he has gained a large measure 
of success, his concern being now the oldest 
and one of the most important of the kintl 
in the city and its operations being of broad 
scope and importance. Within later years he 
has not given so close personal supervision 
to the business, relegating this work to his 
sons, who were trained in the same and who 
are now associated with him under partner- 
ship relations, being numbered among the 



popular and substantial young business men 
of the capital city. Mr. Russe was one of the 
organizers of the Standard Building & Loan 
Association, which was incorporated about 
1887 and which was one of the first organiza- 
tions of its kind in Indianapolis. He was the 
first president of this a.ssociation, and the 
same did a beneficent work under his admin- 
istration, in assisting those in moderate cir- 
cumstances to secure homes of their own. 

Appreciative of the advantages aft'ordad 
him in the land of his adoption, Mr. Russe 
has ever been most loyal to its institutions 
and has been a public-spirited and progressive 
citizen, not hedging hinuself in with his own 
private interests and having been called upon 
to serve in public office in his home city. In 
June, 1892, he was elected a member of the 
Indianapolis board of education, and of this 
position he remained incumbent for six years, 
giving much time and study to conserving 
the best interests of public school work and 
rendering service whose value continues 
cumulative. He was president of the board 
in 1897-8, and retired from office with the 
hearty commendation of his associates and the 
general public. He is also a member of the 
Board of Trade, having joined in 1891. He 
was one of the organizers of the German 
Protestant Orphans' Home, and has been 
officially connected with the same during the 
long intervening period of nearly forty years. 
He is now a member of the board of trustees 
of the institution, as well as its treasurer, and 
his constant sympathj^ for the wards of the 
home has caused him to exert all his influence 
in promoting their welfare. He was also one 
of the organizers and charter members of the 
Deaconess Protestant Hospital, representing 
one of the noble semi-charitable institutions 
of Indianapolis, and he has been a member 
of its board of directors from the time of its 
founding. He was vice-president for some 
time and for the past several years has been 
business manager of the institution, to which 
office he now devotes the major portion of his 
time and attention. It is uniformly conceded 
that to his able and earnest services the suc- 
cess of this altogether worthy institution is 
in large measure due, and his interest in the 
.same is of the most vital and insistent order. 
His private benevolences have been many and 
unostentatious, and knowledge of the same 
could not have been gained save through the 
appreciative words of those who have been 
recipients of his largess and kindly consid- 
eration. Mr. Russe has gained success but he 
has never lost appreciation of the responsi- 
bilities that such success entails, and he has 
shown a- high sense of his stewardship as a 



HISTOEY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



friend of humanity and as one whose heart is 
attuned to sympathy and generosity. None 
more than he has deeper reverence for the 
spiritual verities of the Christian faith, and 
for many years he has been a most devout 
and zealous member, as well as an official, 
of the Evau<relical Zion Church of Indian- 
apolis, of which his wife is also a devoted 
adherent. 

In politics Mr. Russe was aligned as a 
stanch advocate of the principles of the 
Democratic party until the national campaign 
of 1896, when he found his views at variance 
with the free-silver propaganda of the plat- 
form, and he has since maintained an atti- 
tude independent of partisanship, giving his 
support to the candidates and policies meet- 
ing the approval of his judgment and keep- 
ing in close touch with the questions and 
issues of the hour. For many years Mr. 
Russe was affiliated with the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, in which he has passed 
the various official chairs of both the lodge 
and encampment. For many years he was 
also an active member of the Indianapolis 
Independent Turnverein. Concerning Mr. 
Russe one who is familiar with his career 
has written as follows: "He has been an 
active man in business, in public service, and 
in charitable and fraternal circles. He came 
to America a poor young man, with no capital 
other than pluck, industrious habits, honest 
energy and determination, a splendid work- 
ing capital He worked and worked hard; 
he planned, and planned well; he persevered, 
and succeeded. He sought to serve those 
about him and did faithful service. His de- 
votion to principle is inflexible. He is a 
strong man and a good citizen." 

In the year 1872 was solemnized the mar- 
riage of Mr. Russe to Miss Amelia Habeny, 
who was bom and reared in Indianapolis, be- 
ing a daughter of the late Henry and Chris- 
tina (Limberg) Habeny, and who has proved 
to him a devoted companion and helpmeet. 
They became the parents of six children, of 
whom four are living: Harry and Paul are 
associated with their father in business, as 
already intimated; William is chief engineer 
at the Deaconess Hospital; and Julia, who 
remains at the parental home. Frederick 
died in infancy, and Edward passed away 
at the age of twenty-three years, as the result 
of illness contracted while serving as a mem- 
ber of the Indianapolis fire department. 

James E. Lilly. Of primary and most 
insistent relevancy to the industrial and gen- 
eral commercial historj- of "Greater Indian- 
apolis" is the record of the splendid corpor- 
ation known as the Eli Lilly Company, of 



which the subject of this brief sketch is vice- 
president and trea.surer. There can be no 
measure of inconsistency in saying that of 
all the great concerns that have contributetl 
to the commercial advancement and prestige 
of the Indiana metropolis, none has been a 
factor of more distinct importance than this 
company, whose establishment is one of the 
best of its kind in the Union, whose business 
ramifications have carried the name and fame 
of Indianapolis into the most diverse sections 
of the civilized world, and whose beneficent 
influence, by verj reason of the products 
sent forth, has transcendet. the bounds of 
mere commercialism and made for the well- 
being of humanity. This statement will read- 
ily be understood when recognition is had of 
the scope of the magnificent enterprise of the 
company— manufacturers of pharmaceutical 
preparations, new chemicals, digestive fer- 
ments, gelatine products, etc., and importers 
of crude vegetable drugs, oils, etc., in orig- 
inal packages. W^ith the development of this 
splendid business enterprise, James E. Lilly 
has been closely associated with his brother, 
Eli, who was the founder of the same, and 
both have long held precedence as representa- 
tive citizens of the Indiana capital. 

James Edward Lilly was born in the beau- 
tiful old city of Lexington, Kentucky, on the 
8th of July, 1844, and is a son of Gustavus 
and Esther E. (Kirby) Lilly, who removed 
from that state to Indiana when he was a lad 
of eight years, settling in Greeneastle, 
where his father engaged in contracting. The 
parents passed the remainder of their lives in 
Indiana, where they ever retained the high re- 
gard of all who knew them. The son James 
E. was afforded the advantages of the com- 
mon schools of Greeneastle, and when seven- 
teen years of age he signified his youthful 
loyalty and patriotism by tendering his serv- 
ices in defense of the Union, in response to 
President Lincoln's call for volunteers. In 
May, 1862, he enlisted as a private in Com- 
pany D, Fifty-fifth Indiana Volunteer Infan- 
try, with' which he proceeded to the front, and 
upon the expiration of his term of three 
months, in November, 1862, he re-enlisted, be- 
coming a menvber of Company H, Forty-third 
Indiana Volunteer Infantry, with which he 
served until the close of the war and with 
which he took pirt in the various battles and 
minor engagements in which the gallant reg- 
iment was involved as a part of the Army of 
the Trans-Mississippi Department. He re- 
ceived his honorable discharge in July, 1865. 
as first lieutenant of his company. He signi- 
fies his continued interest in his old comrades 
in arms by retaining membership in the Mil- 



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HISTORY OF GEEATEK INDIATsTAPOLIS. 



837 



I 



itary Order of the Loyal Legion of the Unit- 
ed States. 

After the close of the -war Mr. Lilly en- 
tered the employ of Cloud, Aiken & Com- 
pany, wholesale druggists, of Evansville, In- 
diana, with which concern he continued until 
1870, when he then engaged in the manu- 
facturing of pharmaceutical preparations, in 
which line of enterprise he continued until 
1876, when he became connected with the 
wholesale pharmaceutical house of William R. 
Warner & Company, of Philadelphia. In 1878 
he came to Indianapolis, where he associated 
himself with his brother Eli in the manu- 
facturing of pharmaceutical preparations, 
and with this concern, under its various 
changes of title, he has since been actively 
identified in an executive capacity and as an 
interested principal. In 1881 he established 
the branch house in Kansas City, Missouri, 
of which he had the general supervision un- 
til 1889, when he returned to Indianapolis, 
where he has since given his time and atten- 
tion to the administration of the large and 
constantly expanding business now conducted 
under the title of The Eli Lilly and Company, 
of which, as already stated, he is vice-president 
and.treasurer. Mr. Lilly is essentially a loyal 
and progressive business man and public- 
spirited citizen, and he maintains a lively in- 
terest in all that tends to conserve the civic 
and commercial advancement of his home 
city, where his business and social relations 
have ever been of the most agreeable order 
and where he is held in unequivocal confi- 
dence and esteem. In politics he gives his 
allegiance to the Republican party, though 
never animated by aught of ambition for pub- 
lie office of any description. 

In 1868 Mr. Lilly was united in marriage 
to Miss Matilda M. Dexter, daughter of Cap- 
tain Henry T. Dexter, of Evansville, Indiana, 
and she died in Kansas City, in 1884, being 
survived by one daughter, Mary D., who is 
now the wife of A. G. Kyle, of Harrodsburg, 
Kentucky. In 1890 was solemnized ,the mar- 
riage of Mr. Lilly to Miss Nora Robinson, of 
St. Charles, Missouri, who presides with gra- 
cious dignity over their beautiful home, 
which is a center of social hospitality. 

Henry A. Mansfield. If success be predi- 
cated from the mark of definite accomplish- 
ment in the. utilization of one's individual 
powers and ability, then Henry A. Mansfield 
has certainly achieved success. In the field 
of practical engineering work he gained 
marked prestige at an early age, and to-day 
he is a representative exponent of this line 
of business in the capital city. He held the 
office of city engineer of Indianapolis when 



but twenty-two years of age, and the results 
of his able service in this capacity shall long 
be recognized and appreciated. 

Mr. Mansfield finds a due measure ot satis- 
faction in reverting to the old Buckeye state 
as the place of his nativity. He was born in 
Ashland, Ohio, on the 16th of November, 
1868, and is the tenth in order of birth of the 
eleven children born to Martin H. and Anna 
(Saiger) Mansfield, both of whom were na- 
tives of Pennsylvania. The father was a man 
of marked mechanical ability and was the in- 
ventor of a number of practical devices, in- 
cluding a clover huller, in the manufacture 
of which he was engaged in Ashland, Ohio, 
for many years prior to his. death, which oc- 
curred when Henry A. of this review was 
about ten years of age. The mother sur- 
vived a number of years and of the children 
seven are now living. Henry A. Mansfield 
was afforded the advantages of the public 
schools of his native town and after the com- 
pletion of the curriculum of the high school 
he secured employment in the engineering de- 
partment of the Pennsylvania Railroad, at 
Richmond, Indiana, where he remained one 
year, at the expiration of which he was trans- 
ferred by the company, in 1886, to Indian- 
apolis, where he has since maintained his 
home. He continued with the railroad com- 
pany until 1890, in November of which year 
he was elected city engineer of Indianapolis, 
to which responsible office he came admirably 
equipped, though, as already stated, he was 
but twenty-two years of age at the time, and 
he had the distinction of being the youngest 
man ever chosen to fill this position in the 
Indiana capital. He held the office, and most 
capably handled its affairs, for four years, 
during the administration of Mayor Thomas 
L. Sullivan, and the present effective sewer- 
age system of the city was devised and laid 
out by him, and approved by Rudolph Her- 
ing, consulting engineer, while the general 
engineering plans of the city are still those 
which were formulated by Mr. Mansfield. 

Upon retiring from the office of city engi- 
neer Mr. Mansfield engaged in business as" an 
engineer and contractor, in construction work 
and contracting along general engineering 
lines. In this enterprise, in which he has 
attained to marked success and being identi- 
fied with a large amount of important con- 
tract work in Indianapolis and elsewhere, he 
is now associated with D. V. Moore, under 
the partnership title of the Mansfield Engi- 
neering Company. This alliance was formed 
and the name adopted in 1899. In 1902 was 
effected the organization of the Moore-Mans- 
field Construction Company, and of this com- 



8?8 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



pany, whose operations have been of inipoi-- 
tant order, Mr. Mansfield is president and 
treasurer. He may be consistently designated 
one of the aggressive and successful "cap- 
tains of industry" who are contributing to 
the upbuilding of the larger and greater In- 
dianapolis and as a citizen he is essentially 
loyal and public-spirited. He has been an 
advocate and a hard fighter for the improve- 
ment and development of Fall Creek, believ- 
ing, boulevards are a necessity in the city. 
He is a stanch advocate of the principles of 
the Democratic party and is a member of 
the Indiana Democratic Club. He is identi- 
fied with the Columbia Club, the Commercial 
Club and the Indianapolis Bosrd of Trade, 
and in the time-honored Masonic fraternity 
he has attained the thirty-second degree of 
the Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite, besides 
being enrolled as a popular member of Murat 
Temple, Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles 
of the Mystic Shrine. 

In 1891 Mr. Mansfield was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Ada F. Freeland, of Spencer, 
Indiana, and they have one child, Freeland. 

Charles M. Cross. Among those success- 
fully engaged in the real estate business in 
Indianapolis is Charles M. Cross, who has 
here followed this important line of enter- 
priseVsince 1895 and whose operations have 
included the handling and improving of niani^ 
properties of important order, thus contribut- 
ing in a material way to the progress and de- 
velopment of "Greater Indianapolis". Mr. 
Cross has maintained his home in Indianapo- 
lis for more than a quarter of a century and 
is here known as a loyal citizen and as a re- 
liable and progressive business man who has 
achieved success through his own well di- 
rected endeavors. 

Charles M. Cross reverts to the fine old 
Keystone state of the Union as the place of 
his nativity, since he was born at Alexandria, 
Huntingdon County, Pennsylvania, on the 
1st of March, 1857. He is one of the five 
living children of Benjamin and Mary (Sai- 
nor) Cross, both of whom were born and 
reared in Pennsylvania, where they passed 
their entire lives and where the father was a 
carpenter and building contractor by voca- 
tion. He was of French and German lineage 
and his wife was a representative of one of 
the old and honored German families of 
Pennsylvania. The parents were folk of ster- 
ling character and ever commanded the high 
regard of all M-ho knew them. Both con- 
tinued to reside in Alexandria until they 
were summoned from the scene of life's en- 
deavors and both were consistent members 
of the German Reformed Church. 



Charles M. Cross is indebted to the public 
schools of his native village for his early edu- 
cational training, and his ambition and ap- 
preciation were such that he defrayed the ex- 
penses of his higher academic education 
largely through his own efforts. He secured 
employment as a traveling salesman and 
through the alternating of his services in this 
way with attendance in college, he was able 
to continue his studies for two years in Mer- 
cersburg College, at Mercersburg, Pennsyl- 
vania, and for an equal period in Heidelberg 
College, at Tiffin, Ohio. After leaving college 
Mr. Cross continued to be employed as a 
traveling commercial salesman for fifteen 
years, during a considerable portion of which 
time he represented a leading wholesale con- 
cern of Indianapolis. He was married in the 
year 1883 and forthwith took up his residence 
in Indianapolis, where he has maintained his 
home during the long intervening years. He 
continued "on the road" until 1895, when he 
engaged in the real estate business in this 
city, initiating operations on a somewhat 
modest .scale and gradually expanding the 
same until he has now control of a large and 
substantial enterprise in this line. His books 
show at all times most desirable investijients 
and his scrupulous care and honor in all 
transactions have given to him a reputation 
that constitutes the best possible advertise- 
ment of his business. He has bought and sold 
realty in various parts of the city, has erected 
numerous buildings and placed the improved 
properties on the market, and has been con- 
cerned in the development of several of the 
newer residence sections of the capital city. 
;\Ir. Cross has shown marked executive ability 
and has handled his independent business 
with much of prescience and skill, so that his 
operations have yielded to him due returns 
and have proved of value to those whom he 
has served in his professional capacity as a 
general real estate dealer. His success is the 
more gratifying to contemplate on the score 
that it represents the direct results of his own 
labors and ability. He has been dependent 
upon his own resources from early youth and 
has made his business career worthy in all re- 
spects. 

In politics Mr. Cross is not a turbulent 
partisan, but he gives allegiance to the cause 
of the Democratic party. In the time-hon- 
ored IMasonic fraternity he has attained the 
thirty-second degree of the Ancient Accepted 
Scottish Rite and his .so.iourn across the burn- 
ing sands has placed him in good repute as a 
member of Murat Temple, Ancient Arabic 
Order of the Nobles of the !Mystic Shrine. His 
maximum York Rite affiliation is with Raper 





A^ 



HISTORY OF GREATER INDIANAPOLIS. 



839 



Commandery, No. 1, Knights Templar, and he 
is also affiliated with the Knights of Pythias. 

In the year 1883 was solemnized the mar- 
riage of Mr. Cross to Miss Laura Lott, of 
Tiffin, Ohio, a graduate of Heidelberg College, 
of that place, and the children of this union 
are Harry E., Jessie M., Charles M., Jr., 
Helen Ida, and Donald Frederick. 

Hugh Dougherty. That "man lives not 
to himself alone" is an assurance that is am- 
ply verified in all the affairs of life, but its 
pertinence is the more patent in those in- 
stances where persons have so employed their 
inherent talents, so improved their oppor- 
tunities and so marshaled their forces as to 
gain prestige which find its angle of influ- 
ence ever broadening in practical beneficence 
and human helpfulness. He whose productive 
activities are directed along legitimate and 
normal lines is by very virtue of this fact 
exerting a force that conserves human prog- 
ress and prosperity, and the man of capacity 
for business affairs of broad scope and im- 
portance finds himself an involuntary steward 
upon whom devolve large responsibilities. To 
the extent that he appreciates these duties 
and responsibilities and proved faithful in 
his stewardship does he also contribute to the 
well being of the world in which he moves. 
Hugh Dougherty has been essentially a man 
who "has done things", and this accomplish- 
ment has been altogether worthy in all the 
lines along M-hich he has directed his energies. 
As a man of ability, sturdy integrity and 
usefulness, and as a citizen representative of 
the utmost loyalty he merits consideration in 
this publication, which touches the "Greater 
Indianapolis" and those who have con- 
tributed to and sustained the city's civic and 
material prosperity and precedence. He is 
now president of the Marion Trust Company, 
one of the most" important financial and 
fiduciary institutions of the state, having held 
the position since 1904, in which year he took 
up his residence in Indianapolis. Prior to 
that time he had been a resident of the thriv- 
ing little city of Bluffton, Indiana, for a 
period of nearly forty years. He has been 
prominently identified with various business 
operations of importance for many years, es- 
pecially in the promotion of the affairs of 
independent telephone companies; he is 
known as an able financier and a man of 
marked initiative and constructive talent; he 
has been influential in political affairs; and 
his loyalty as a true son of the republic was 
shown in a distinctive way through his serv- 
ice as a soldier in the Civil war. Lives of 
such activity and usefulness are ever worthy 



of .study and bear objective lesson and in- 
centive. 

Mr. Dougherty was born on a farm in 
Neave Township, Darke County, Ohio, and 
the date of his nativity was July 28, 1844. 
He bears the full patronymic of his honored 
grandfather, Hugh Dougherty, who was born 
in County Donegal, Ireland, where he was 
reared and educated and whence he immi- 
grated to America when a young man. This 
worthy ancestor first settled in Washington 
County, Pennsylvania, in 1818, and he 
eventually removed thence and became one 
of the pioneer settlers of Darke County, 
Ohio, where he secured a tract of wild land 
and instituted its reclamation. William 
Dougherty, father of the subject of this re- 
view, was born in Washington County, Penn- 
sylvania, and his active career was princi- 
pally one of intimate identification with th'^ 
great ba.sic industry of agriculture, in connec- 
tion with which he so directed his energies as 
to gain a due mea.sure of success and pros- 
perity. He continued to reside in Darke 
County until his death, which occurred when 
he was about fifty-nine years of age. His 
wife, whose maiden name was Margaret 
Studabaker, was , a daughter of Abraham 
Studabaker, one of the pioneers and influen- 
tial citizens of Drake County, Ohio, and a 
distant relative 'of the Indiana family of the 
name who have become widely known as man- 
ufacturers of carriages and wagons. Mrs. 
Dougherty was about thirty-nine years of age 
at the time of her demise, and of the seven 
children one son and two daughters are now 
living. The parents were zealous members 
of the Christian Church and were persons of 
sterling character and ot more than ordinary 
intellectuality. 

Hugh Dougherty, whose name initiates this 
sketch, was reared to the sturdy and invig- 
orating discipline of the home farm and his 
early educational advantages were those af- 
forded in the common schools of the locality 
and period. That he made good use of his 
limited scholastic opportunities is evident 
when cognizance is taken of the fact that at 
the age of- seventeen years he proved himself 
eligible for pedagogic honors, having secured 
a teacher's license after passing the required 
examination. He taught one term in a dis- 
trict school of his native county and then, 
like many another loyal youth of the north, 
he subordinated all other considerations to 
respond to the call of higher duty and go 
forth in defense of the Union, whose integ- 
rity was jeopardized by armed rebellion. 
July 26, 1862. he enli.sted as a private in 
Company F, Ninety-fourth Ohio Volunteer 



8:30 



HISTOnV OF OIJEATEH INDIAN'APOLIS. 



Jiifimtry, whicli i)nii-i'wled to tlu' front. h;iv- 
iiitr been iissi.uiu'il to the Army of tlif Poto- 
iiiai-. With his coimiiaiid hv participated in 
the battles of Kiehniond